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NGInfra Academy 2010 / 19-24 September 2010

updated: 
Tuesday, May 25, 2010 - 5:39am
full name / name of organization: 
Next Generation Infrastructures

The NGInfra Academy
'An exceptional learning opportunity for forward-thinking young academic professionals engaged in the design and management of tomorrow's infrastructure systems'

After a successful launch in 2009, Next Generation Infrastructures will organize the exclusive NGInfra Academy for the second time. Participants of the Next Generation Infrastructures Programme from diverse countries will provide young professionals in the infrastructure business and junior academic researchers with inspiring masterclasses, workshops and insights in their organizations.

Crossing Borders: Traveling, Teaching, and Learning in a Global Age

updated: 
Tuesday, May 25, 2010 - 12:06am
full name / name of organization: 
New York Institute of Technology/Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications
contact email: 

New York Institute of Technology/Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications Spring Conference 2011
"Crossing Borders: Traveling, Teaching, and Learning in a Global Age"

Location: Nanjing, China
Dates: April 16th and April 17th, 2011
Abstract and panel proposal submission deadline: August 31st, 2010

Affects and Spaces in Latin American Cinema, Performance and Literature, Nemla, New Brunswick 2011

updated: 
Monday, May 24, 2010 - 7:54pm
full name / name of organization: 
Rutgers University

This panel at NEMLA conference in Rutgers University in New Brunswick, aims to discuss the relation between affect and spaces in contemporary Latin American cinema, performance and literature. New approaches to affect theory are most welcome, as are new approaches to space, particularly spaces across genres and beyond face-to-face relations. How are affects and spaces impacted by communication technologies and the growing intensification of cultural hybridization? Please send 300-500 word abstracts in English or Spanish and a brief biographical statements by email to Valeria Garrote vgarrote@eden.rutgers.edu
Deadline: September 15th

Central European Authors--April 7-10, 2011--New Brunswick, NJ

updated: 
Monday, May 24, 2010 - 6:55pm
full name / name of organization: 
NeMLA
contact email: 

In "The Curtain: An Essay in Seven Parts," Milan Kundera observes that Central Europe is rarely perceived as an important region in Europe. Indeed, he attests that the nations that create Central Europe 'have never been masters of either their own destinies or their borders.' As such, the countries that form Central Europe have been viewed as extensions of thriving European countries, such as Germany. Yet, the subordination of Central European countries to either Western or Eastern European nations has had drastic impacts on the writers that emerged from this region, as they have been forced to write in non-native languages, have endured political oppression, and weathered several political upheavals.

CFP: Introductory Issue of Diesis: Footnotes on Literary Identities [Submission Deadline July 19]

updated: 
Monday, May 24, 2010 - 6:19pm
full name / name of organization: 
Diesis: Footnotes on Literary Identities

Summer 2010 Introductory Issue of Diesis: Footnotes on Literary Identities.

Article Submission Deadline: July 19th

Open Call for Articles

The editorial board of Diesis: Footnotes Literary Identities welcomes submissions for our introductory issue. A diesis (or double dagger) is a typographical symbol that indicates a footnote or point of reference within a written work. Diesis seeks to act as a point of reference in the study of the maturation and diversity of socially and biologically constructed performances of identity through a variety of critical lenses. Essays that explore authorial, literary, and socio-political identities across time, space, and genre are particularly encouraged.

"Contingent Communities" (U of M, Fall '10)

updated: 
Monday, May 24, 2010 - 5:58pm
full name / name of organization: 
Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature

"Contingent Communities" (2010)
The Annual Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature Conference at University of Minnesota
Dates: 10/15/10-10/17/10

Keynote Speakers: Rey Chow and Peter Hitchcock

First CFP: THE ANATOMY OF MARGINALITY (A Special Issue of "The European Legacy" )‏

updated: 
Monday, May 24, 2010 - 12:42pm
full name / name of organization: 
Costica Bradatan
contact email: 

(Please circulate widely & apologies for cross-postings!)

First Call for Papers: THE ANATOMY OF MARGINALITY

A Special Issue of "The European Legacy"

Guest Editors: COSTICA BRADATAN (The Honors College, Texas Tech University) & AURELIAN CRAIUTU (Department of Political Science, Indiana University, Bloomington)

"Ecocritical Activisms and Activist Ecologies" NeMLA 2011 April 6-10, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ: Abstracts Sept 30

updated: 
Monday, May 24, 2010 - 12:21pm
full name / name of organization: 
42nd Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

Ecocriticism informs ecological activisms, and vice versa. What kind of change can the intersections and tensions between ecocriticism and activism bring about? While ecocriticism has become an increasingly popular field of inquiry, its positionality remains an issue for negotiation. From Rachel Carson's Silent Spring (1962), which continues to influence mass eco-activisms, to the anti-GMO groups that shape discussions of bioethics, ecocriticism remains in dialogue with practical approaches in what Lawrence Buell has termed a "spirit of commitment to environmentalist praxis" (The Environmental Imagination, 1995). Moreover, current ecocritical scholarship underscores a general distrust of the romanticizing rhetoric of early ecocriticism.

Cinema and the Carnivalesque—2011 SCMS Panel in New Orleans (03/10-03/13)

updated: 
Monday, May 24, 2010 - 12:07pm
full name / name of organization: 
Maggie Hennefeld / Brown University

The comedic and socially transgressive mode that Mikhail Bakhtin defines as "carnivalesque" primarily concerns literary forms of representation. This panel poses the question: what would it mean for the cinematic medium to be carnivalesque?

Bakhtin emphasizes the following key criteria for the carnivalesque: the replacement of order with chaos; temporary reversals of social hierarchies (crownings and decrownings); aesthetic defamiliarization through parodic or grotesque modes; and dialogical forms of communication that efface any dominant, authorial voice and that seek to negotiate more democratic relationships between "reader" and "text."

This panel welcomes papers that grapple with one or more of the following questions:

[UPDATE] short essays: literature, justice, law, teaching and social change June- August

updated: 
Monday, May 24, 2010 - 11:22am
full name / name of organization: 
Changing Lives Through Literature
contact email: 

Changing Lives Through Literature is a nationally recognized alternative sentencing program for criminal offenders founded in 1991 on the power of literature to transform lives. CLTL sentences criminal offenders to a series of literature seminars instead of traditional probation. Studies have confirmed that program graduates are half as likely to commit additional crimes than their counterparts in the justice system.

Crowd Forms in American Literature: Masses, Classes and Publics

updated: 
Monday, May 24, 2010 - 9:15am
full name / name of organization: 
42nd Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
contact email: 

Speaking of literature in general, Larzer Ziff notes that the crowd is "at best…but a backdrop" against which the drama of the individual unfolds ("Whitman and the Crowd" 585). Henry James makes such a recognition a virtual dictum of realism, when, in the preface to The Princess Casamassima, he speaks of the necessity of the "finely aware" individual consciousness for registering the fleeting impressions of the crowded city streets (12). When the crowd does take center stage in the literary text, it is often, as Nicolaus Mills points out, represented as unruly, violent, and irrational (The Crowd in American Literature 4).

Intention and Intentionality (NEMLA April 2011)

updated: 
Sunday, May 23, 2010 - 10:52pm
full name / name of organization: 
Josh Gang, Department of English, Rutgers Univ.
contact email: 

Sixty years after the publication of Wimsatt and Beardsley's 'The Intentional Fallacy,' the problem of intention continues to haunt literary criticism. Authorial intention exists--but as literary critics, we don't generally talk about it. Looking to recent work in the history of criticism, literary theory, philosophy, and the history of ideas, this panel asks why this is the case. The theoretical justifications for discounting authorial intention--whether from Wimsatt and Beardsley, Barthes, Foucault, or de Man--have slowly faded into history. But as a practice of criticism and as a practice of teaching literature, that attitude towards intention remains

Cinema and the Carnivalesque—2011 SCMS Panel in New Orleans (03/10-03/13)

updated: 
Sunday, May 23, 2010 - 5:23pm
full name / name of organization: 
Maggie Hennefeld / Brown University

"Carnival is the place for working out, in a concretely sensuous, half-real and half-play-acted form, a new mode of interrelationship between individuals, counterposed to the all-powerful social-hierarchical relationships of everyday life" (Mikhail Bakhtin in Problems of Dostoevsky's Poetics).

The comedic and socially transgressive mode that Mikhail Bakhtin defines as "carnivalesque" primarily concerns literary forms of representation. This panel poses the question: what would it mean for the cinematic medium to be carnivalesque?

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