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Collection CFP: Attached to Fiction: Trauma, Loss, Pleasure (4 October, 2010)

updated: 
Thursday, June 3, 2010 - 6:03am
Dr Hila Shachar and Dr Sophie Sunderland/English and Cultural Studies, University of Western Australia

Collection Call for Papers:

Attached to Fiction: Trauma, Loss, Pleasure

Editors: Dr Hila Shachar and Dr Sophie Sunderland, English and Cultural Studies, University of Western Australia

Contact email: attachedtofiction@gmail.com

"Mr Sakamoto said that reading had saved his life. Not mathematics. Not money. Not travel. Reading. At a time, he said, when he felt blasted by images, words had anchored him, secured him, stopped his free-falling plunge into nowhere."

-Gail Jones, Dreams of Speaking (London: Harvill Secker, 2006), p. 132.

Separation as Condition and as Solution (NeMLA 2011)

updated: 
Thursday, June 3, 2010 - 1:27am
Aryeh Amihay

SEPARATION AS CONDITION AND AS SOLUTION

42nd Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
April 7-10, 2011
New Brunswick, NY – Hyatt New Brunswick
Host Institution: Rutgers University

An interdisciplinary seminar on aspects of separation: race, religion, gender, politics, family and more. Examples include: gender separation in prayer houses and schools; the Berlin Wall; the separation barrier in Israel / Palestine; Jim Crow and Apartheid laws; religious taboos of separation; separation of the sick or disabled.

For further information, please visit: http://www.princeton.edu/~aamihay/sep

Legal Fictions, NEMLA, April 7-10, 2011

updated: 
Wednesday, June 2, 2010 - 10:33pm
42nd Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association

The concept of a "legal fiction"—"a supposition avowedly false, but treated as if it were true, for the imagined convenience of administering the law" (Lewis, 1832)—describes the pretenses that disguise changes in the application of a legal rule. However, as its terminological indebtedness to the institution of fiction underscores, the concept also offers a suggestive rubric for understanding the nexus between law and literature—reminding us that law, as much as literature, is an unstable amalgam of fact and fiction. Examining the fictional elements of law, nonetheless, need not end only in textual ambiguity. The characterization of extant laws as mere fictions of the state has often been a strategy for political critique and legal reform.

The Beautiful Prison

updated: 
Tuesday, June 1, 2010 - 11:14pm
Doran Larson, Hamilton College & Attica CF

The Beautiful Prison

CFP: Iconoclasm: The Breaking and Making of Images, March 17-19, 2011

updated: 
Tuesday, June 1, 2010 - 9:55pm
Rachel Stapleton, Centre for Comparative Literature, University of Toronto

Iconoclasm: The Breaking and Making of Images
University of Toronto, March 17–19, 2011
Confirmed Keynote Address by Carol Mavor (Manchester) (others to follow)

House and Home in 20th Century American Film and Literature (conference 4/2011; abstract due 9/30/2010)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 1, 2010 - 3:01pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

From Blanche Dubois' Belle Reve to Esperanza Cordero's house on Mango Street, houses—and the affiliated, if more abstract, idea of home—figure prominently in 20th century American literature and film. The 20th century, after all, is characterized by both inter- and intra-national migrations which have, invariably, entailed the loss of one home, followed by the acquisition of another. Moreover, the 20th century has seen a steady increase in both actual home ownership and the imaginative importance of owning a home. At the start of the 20th century, 46.5% of Americans—less than one in two—were homeowners but, by 2000, that number had risen to 66.2%, or two in three.

East European Literatures: Thinking Change, Conceiving Futures, NeMLA, April 7-10, 2011

updated: 
Tuesday, June 1, 2010 - 12:15pm
Northeast Modern Language Association

This roundtable seeks proposals with regard to East European literary texts, written after 1989, or contemporary theoretical works that implement or perform a certain vision for the future of the country from which the text hails or of the region as a whole. Because the way change is conceptualized, on both the macro and the micro levels, has a direct bearing on the way a future is conceived, particularly encouraged are submissions that explore this relation. Please email 250-word abstracts to Mihaela Harper at mharper@my.uri.edu.

Abstract deadline: September 30, 2010

Women Writers and Psychoanalysis

updated: 
Monday, May 31, 2010 - 3:40pm
Northeast Modern Language Association

This session is seeking paper submissions for a panel on American women writers' responses to Freud.

Submissions should address one of the following subjects:

Revisions of Freudian texts; Alternatives to the Freudian model of psychoanalytic practice; Responses to Freud as a cultural figure; Writing psychoanalysis through form, style, and technique.

Please email submissions to Kristina Marie Darling, KristinaMarieDarling@yahoo.com

Heroes in Rober Cormier's Novel "Heroes" Deadline: June 1st

updated: 
Monday, May 31, 2010 - 2:11pm
Eduardo Morones/ Moreno Valley High AP Literature Class

Robert Cormier, author of various renowned young adult novels, began writing at the ripe age of twelve. As Cormier began to age and mature, he slowly established a reputation as a brilliant and uncompromising writer. His masterful use of flashback and gothic realism has led him to become one of the most popular novel writers of the 20th century. One of his last novels, Heroes, revolves around the idea of heroism. Some scholars believe a hero is defined by his actions, while others believe it is a person's intentions which make them a hero. What is more important in a person's life - his or her good deeds or bad ones?

The Languages of James Joyce, NeMLA convention, April 7-10, 2011

updated: 
Saturday, May 29, 2010 - 10:44am
Salvatore Pappalardo, Maria Kager/Rutgers University

This panel welcomes papers investigating Joyce's multilingualism. What are the aesthetic and political implications of crossing language boundaries, narrating through multilingual puns and polyglot pastiche in Joyce's works? Suitable topics include the author's complicated relation with Irish, the challenge of translating Joyce's multilingual texts, the relationship between Joyce's multilingualism and cosmopolitanism, and comparisons between Joyce and other writers.

Comparative and interdisciplinary approaches are welcome.

The NeMLA conference, hosted by Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, will take place on April 7-10, 2011.

NEMLA Queer Counterpublics: deadline 9/30/2010

updated: 
Friday, May 28, 2010 - 11:26am
Grace Sikorski

Call for Papers

Queer Counter Public

42nd Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
April 7-10, 2011
New Brunswick, NJ – Hyatt New Brunswick
Host Institution: Rutgers University

This panel welcomes papers on queer counterpublics including LGBTQ, drag, bdsm, fetish, butch/femme, polyamory, etc., in literature, film, and culture; the subversion of the hegemonic order of sex, sexuality, gender, desire, and bodies; alternative discursive, symbolic, imaginary, or literal locations for queer behaviors, bodies, and identities; and the role of consumer culture in the production of queer counterpublics. Submit to gsikorski@aacc.edu

Trauma Narratives and 'Herstory' with special emphasis on the work of Eva Figes

updated: 
Friday, May 28, 2010 - 10:00am
University of Northampton (UK) and University of Zaragoza (Spain)

Trauma Narratives and 'Herstory'
with special emphasis on the work of Eva Figes
An International Conference co-organised by:
Division of Media, English and Culture, School of the Arts, University of Northampton (UK)
Departamento de Filología Inglesa y Alemana, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain)

To be held at the School of the Arts, University of Northampton (UK),Friday 12th – Saturday 13th November 2010

I am a grandmother now and, like all grandmothers, I have a head full of stories about the past. But my stories are not like other people's, which makes them more fascinating for my descendants, if not always easy to talk about. All of them are strange, in one way or another, but so were the times. (Figes, 2008: 1)

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