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Rhetorical Ontologies

updated: 
Tuesday, November 27, 2012 - 1:04pm
Scot Barnett (Clemson) & Casey Boyle (Utah)

This collection explores things that matter in rhetoric. Alongside related developments in philosophy, literary theory, and science and technology studies, scholars in rhetoric and composition have begun to inquire into things and the nonhuman more generally.

CFP: "Woolf and Materiality", August 1, 2013

updated: 
Tuesday, November 27, 2012 - 11:45am
Virginia Woolf Miscellany (Special Issue, Spring 2014)

The VWM invites discussion of how Woolf's writings explore the material world. Articles that directly address the relationship between meaning and materiality are particularly welcome, and potential topics include fresh considerations of Woolf's engagement with: the natural sciences; philosophical conceptualisations of materiality; non/human bodies and objects; fabrics and 'things'; the materiality of language and art. Send submissions of not more than 2500 words to Derek Ryan, d.ryan@exeter.ac.uk by August 1, 2013.

Gender/Genre Conference (Nov 22-23, 2013) (abstracts Jan 15, 2013)

updated: 
Tuesday, November 27, 2012 - 10:11am
Vincent Broqua / University of Paris Est Créteil

"Gender/Genre" Conference

Organized by TIES/IMAGER

University of Paris Est (Créteil/Marne la Vallée)
November 22-23, 2013

The second part of the Gender/Genre conference will be held on November 22-23, 2013 at the University of Paris Est, France. It aims at investigating further the articulation of gender and literary genre from the middle ages to the 21st century. Continuing our debates on the deconstruction of norms, we will welcome papers on all genres in connection with such approaches as feminist studies, masculinity studies, LGBT studies, material culture, and translation studies.

Fwd: CFP: 11th Global Conference: Monsters and the Monstrous (July 2013; Oxford, United Kingdom)

updated: 
Tuesday, November 27, 2012 - 9:31am
Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Net

11th Global Conference
Monsters and the Monstrous

Thursday 18th July – Saturday 20th July 2013
Mansfield College, Oxford

Call for Presentations
This inter and trans-disciplinary project examines all things monstrous; whether real or imagined, ideological or cultural, historic or futuristic. Building on the discussion points of the previous meeting, this year's event will focus upon points of concentration within issues raised at last years events as well as examining certain aspects of the current ubiquity of particular monsters in contemporary popular culture.

Presentations, papers, reports, work-in-progress, workshops and pre-formed panels are invited on issues related to any of the following themes:

Border/lands: An Interdisciplinary Ecocritical Conference

updated: 
Monday, November 26, 2012 - 9:02pm
University of Idaho, Department of English (Graduate Students)

The Graduate Students in the Department of English at the University of Idaho invite submissions for an interdisciplinary conference focusing on ecocritical issues relating to boundaries and the body. The conference will take place April 13th, 2013 and will feature a roundtable discussion with Dr. Scott Slovic, Dr. Erin James, and Dr. Anna Banks. The discussion will address the state of contemporary ecocriticism.

Sherlock Holmes, Past and Present, 21 and 22 June 2013

updated: 
Monday, November 26, 2012 - 8:09pm
Senate House, London

This conference offers a serious opportunity to bring together academics, enthusiasts, creative practitioners and popular writers in a shared discussion about the cultural legacy of Sherlock Holmes. The Strand Magazine and the Sherlock Holmes stories contribute one of the most enduring paradigms for the production and consumption of popular culture in the twentieth- and the twenty-first centuries. The stories precipitated a burgeoning fan culture including various kinds of participation, wiki and crowd-sourcing, fan-fiction, virtual realities and role-play gaming. All of these had existed before but they were solidified, magnified and united by Sherlockians and Holmesians in entirely new ways and on scales never seen before.

Call for Papers: Wounds, Torture, and the Grotesque

updated: 
Monday, November 26, 2012 - 4:09pm
Hortulus: The Online Graduate Journal of Medieval Studies

Hortulus: The Online Graduate Journal of Medieval Studies is a refereed, peer-reviewed, and born-digital journal devoted to the culture, literature, history, and society of the medieval past. Published semi-annually, the journal collects exceptional examples of work by graduate students on a number of themes, disciplines, subjects, and periods of medieval studies. We also welcome book reviews of monographs published or re-released in the past five years that are of interest to medievalists. For the spring issue we are highly interested in reviews of books which fall under the current special topic.

[UPDATE] REMINDER & EXTENSION: Chiasmi 2013, Cultural Materials / Material Culture

updated: 
Monday, November 26, 2012 - 2:46pm
Chiasmi 2013: Cultural Materials / Material Culture, Harvard and Brown Universities, Italian Studies

We are pleased to announce the sixth joint Graduate Student Conference for Italian Studies, to be held on Friday, March 8th and Saturday, March 9th, 2013 at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Lights: MESSA Journal

updated: 
Monday, November 26, 2012 - 2:09pm
Middle Eastern Studies Student Association at the University of Chicago

Good afternoon,

The Middle Eastern Studies Students' Association at the University of Chicago would like to extend this opportunity to Master's students from all departments to submit pieces for its journal, Lights. The journal is currently taking submissions for the Winter quarter. The upcoming deadline is Friday, January 18, 2013.

CFP: Panel on Time to Degree for 2014 Modern Language Association Convention (Chicago, Jan. 9-12, 2014)

updated: 
Monday, November 26, 2012 - 2:07pm
Heather Steffen / MLA Cmte. on the Status of Graduate Students in the Profession

We are seeking papers that theorize or analyze the effects of pressure to decrease time to degree (often without reducing requirements) on Ph.D. students, their scholarship, their teaching, or the profession at large.

Rather than offering ways to decrease time to degree, we are hoping to begin a discussion about what it means to do so. To that end, theoretical and analytical explorations, as well as narratives, will be welcomed, but proposals to shorten time to degree are discouraged. We're interested in hearing from faculty, graduate students, directors of graduate studies, and administrators on this issue.

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