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The Politics of Violence in Contemporary Latin American Cinema

updated: 
Friday, May 25, 2012 - 9:21am
Monica Filimon and Henry Tarco-Carrera/NEMLA 2013

This NEMLA 2013 session will examine the social, moral, and aesthetic implications of violence as it has been conceptualized in post-2000 Latin American cinema. The panel aims to start a discussion about the role of new Latin American cinemas in reflecting and confronting the widespread violence in the region. What role does violence play in today's communities? How is it transmitted from one generation to another? How does violence infiltrate and reshape the relationship between the sexes, races, ethnic groups, and social classes? What types of violence dominate? How and why does violence cross national borders? Is violence always transgressive or can it be legitimated? What are the moral connotations of the consumption of violent films?

CFP: George Perkins Marsh: An American for All Seasons (Essay Collection)

updated: 
Friday, May 25, 2012 - 8:57am
Stevens Institute of Technology

The College of Arts and Letters at Stevens Institute of Technology invites submissions for a collection of essays addressing the life and legacy of George Perkins Marsh (1801-1882) -- environmentalist, diplomat, philosopher, and scholar. The publication will include revised proceedings from our recent conference, George Perkins Marsh: An American for All Seasons. Send essays (10,000 words max.) or proposals (250-500 words) to Edward Foster, talismaned@aol.com. Deadline: 28 June 2012.

The Essay: Forms and Transformations

updated: 
Friday, May 25, 2012 - 8:07am
Dr. Markus Oppolzer / University of Salzburg

The Essay has constituted an important prose form from the sixteenth century until the present and constitutes an intriguing field for interdisciplinary study. Applied to such a heterogeneous range of writings as maxims, aphorisms and proverbs, letters, treatises in philosophy and the sciences, as well as criticism and journalism of different kinds, it has eluded clear definition. Not surprisingly, literary and cultural studies have been reluctant to tackle what appears to be a random array of prose texts straddling the boundaries between literature, philosophy and scientific writing, criticism and journalism.

CFP: Literature and Photography Special Issue, September 17, 2012

updated: 
Thursday, May 24, 2012 - 5:44pm
LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory

How do you "see" literature? How do you "write" photography? In recent years, scholars have drawn a connection between the nineteenth-century realist novel and the rise of photography, suggesting that the novel genre is intrinsically photographic. This argument hinges, in part, on realism, or at the very least on reality effects. Nineteenth-century photography was indeed often used to document: to record landscapes, cityscapes, portraits, and crime scenes. Yet it was also from the start a creative technology, a mode of representation open to experimentation and artistic innovation. How does photography intersect with literature when the aims of one or both are not to represent reality?

Textual Debts (and Textual Debtors) in Golden Age Spain, M/MLA, Nov. 8-11, 2012

updated: 
Thursday, May 24, 2012 - 3:54pm
Midwest MLA

2012 M/MLA

This panel explores the way authors in Golden Age Spain accounted for textual debts, whether in their own production or in that of others. How do poets trace literary heritage, such as the sonnet or epic forms, or Petrarchan traditions? How do authors view material 'borrowed' or imitated by contemporaries? How do authors figure their own 'borrowings'? Textual forms and modes such as translation, adaptation, the sequel/continuation, and the re-edition are all valuable points of interest, but of equal importance are technical elements such as allusion or style that produce similar forms of textual indebtedness.

CFP: Midwest MLA Special Session, November 8-11, 2012 - "Writing the Ineffable: Mystic Literature and the Limits(?) of Language"

updated: 
Thursday, May 24, 2012 - 1:51pm
Morgan Shipley / Michigan State University

In The Varieties of Religious Experience, William James informs us that the mystical state operates in an ineffable realm and, as such, language remains incapable of accurately narrating or textualizing the mystical experience. And yet, mystical literature has attempted to find expression for what, ostensibly, can be described as an absence, a lack, a debt within the normative structures of communicative and discursive language. If the mystical experience inhabits a landscape beyond the limits and borders of language, how do writers find the words to describe the ineffable? How do form, word-play, negative dialectics and deconstructive tendencies help structure, out of an absence, a mystic analysis or language of unity?

Appropriating the Bible in Medieval and Early Modern Cultures, Deadline 9/30/12

updated: 
Thursday, May 24, 2012 - 10:38am
Northeast Modern Language Association

Appropriating the Bible in Medieval and Early Modern Cultures

44th Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
March 21-24, 2013
Boston, Massachusetts
Host Institution: Tufts University

During the medieval and early modern periods, the Bible was a source of worship, instruction, and entertainment. This panel invites papers that address ways the Bible was read, misread, adapted, or performed. A variety of approaches and perspectives are welcomed. Topics might include translation and adaptation, Bible illustration, the commentary tradition, biblical exempla, apocryphal narrative, and drama.

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