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[UPDATED] Being More than Ambivalent Towards Race: Class in Contemporary African American Literature

updated: 
Friday, May 11, 2012 - 2:54pm
Midwest Modern Language Association (MMLA)

In keeping with the theme of "Debt" for the 2012 Midwestern MLA conference, this panel is interested in the class implications that contemporary African American literature offers its readership. Since the first letters written in African American literature, money has had a central place in claims for independence, subjectivity, and resistance. How has this understanding of subjectivity and resistance changed in a late twentieth/ twenty-first century context? To what extent is contemporary African American literature invested in the American dream of financial well being that characterized earlier writing?

UPDATED: Those That Came Before: Black Literary Indebtedness

updated: 
Friday, May 11, 2012 - 2:52pm
Midwest Modern Language Association (MMLA)

In "The Site of Memory," Toni Morrison claims that as an African American writer her literary heritage is the autobiography, the slave narrative. Quoting Harriet Jacobs, Morrison claims that a central trope of the slave narrative is occlusion, leaving the unspeakable unspoken. However, for Morrison, a writer heavily indebted to her formerly enslaved precursors, "the exercise is very different. [Her] job becomes how to rip that veil drawn over "proceedings too terrible to relate." Morrison pays her literary debt to these authors by revealing that to which they were unable. In what ways do 20th and 21st Century black American authors struggle with or against their 19th Century literary heritage? Or even their early twentieth century heritage?

The Literature of Hurricane Katrina (essay collection)

updated: 
Friday, May 11, 2012 - 11:59am
Mary Ruth Marotte, Associate Professor of English, Graduate Director, University of Central Arkansas

Seeking critical essays (20-30 pages in length) on works of fiction that feature the disaster of Hurricane Katrina within the narrative.

Samuel Beckett Summer School

updated: 
Thursday, May 10, 2012 - 3:35pm
Stephen Wilmer Trinity College Dublin

Following the successful launch of the inaugural Samuel Beckett Summer School last July, Trinity College Dublin is delighted to announce that this year's school, whose patron is Edward Beckett, will take place on campus from July 15 - 21, 2012. The weeklong celebration of the Nobel-Prize-winning Irish writer is designed to draw scholars, students and enthusiasts from around the world to explore his work in the very location where Beckett, as a student, began his distinctive intellectual and creative life.

MPCA/ACA 2012: Harry Potter Panel (October 12-14, 2012)

updated: 
Thursday, May 10, 2012 - 3:09pm
Orlando Dos Reis / Midwest Popular Culture Association / American Culture Association

The Harry Potter area of the Midwest Popular Culture Association/Midwest American Culture Association invites panel and paper proposals for its annual conference. The conference will be held from October 12-14, 2012 at the Renaissance Columbus Downtown Hotel in Columbus, Ohio.

Proposals and abstracts of about 250-300 words on any aspect of Harry Potter are welcome, although topics focusing on Pottermore or Harry Potter within the context of literary history are of particular interest this year.

Please submit proposals and abstracts to the Area Chair. Electronic submissions should be sent to Orlando Dos Reis, Kansas State University at dosreis@ksu.edu. Deadline for submissions is May 30, 2012.

BIG DATA AND UNCERTAINTY IN THE HUMANITIES September 22, 2012, University of Kansas

updated: 
Thursday, May 10, 2012 - 2:44pm
The Institute for Digital Research in the Humanities at the University of Kansas

BIG DATA AND UNCERTAINTY IN THE HUMANITIES September 22, 2012, University of Kansas

This conference seeks to address the opportunities and challenges humanistic scholars face with the ubiquity and exponential growth of new web-based data sources (e.g. electronic texts, social media, and audiovisual materials) and digital methods (e.g. information visualization, text markup, crowdsourcing metadata).

Monsters and the Monstrous Volume 2, Number 2, Special Issue on Monstrous Pedagogy: Teaching and Reading the Twilight Saga

updated: 
Thursday, May 10, 2012 - 7:47am
Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Net

Journal Announcement and Call for Submissions

Monsters and the Monstrous
Volume 2, Number 2, Special Issue on Monstrous Pedagogy: Teaching and Reading the Twilight Saga

As we approach the release of the final cinematic installment of the Twilight Saga we want to focus on monsters and pedagogy and in particular the relation between "Twilight and the Classroom". How do we teach Twilight? Why do we teach Twilight? Should we teach Twilight?

The Editors welcome contributions to the journal in the form of articles, reviews, reports, art and/or visual pieces and other forms of submission on the following or related themes:

[UPDATE] MUSES INDIA: Dis(-)covering Indian Writing in English

updated: 
Thursday, May 10, 2012 - 2:02am
Chetan Deshmane

We invite papers of high literary standards by scholars in the field of Indian Writing in English to contribute to a book to be published by McFarland & Co., Inc., USA in 2013. We encourage only Poststructuralist / Postmodernist / Cultural / Postcolonial / Globalization perspectives. Papers focusing the works of Amitav Ghosh, Anita Rau Badami, Chrostopher Cyrill, Shani Mootoo, Bapsi Sidhwa, Gita Mehta, Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni, Sujata Bhatt will be preferred.

[Update] PAMLA Conference (October 19-21, 2012) at Seattle University CFP--Deadline May 15

updated: 
Wednesday, May 9, 2012 - 6:19pm
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association

Over thirty sessions for the 2012 PAMLA Conference to be held October 19-21, 2012, at Seattle University, have extended their proposal deadline through Tuesday, May 15 (see list below). To see more about the conference, or to submit a paper proposal to one of these sessions, please visit:

www.pamla.org/2012

Sessions still in search of panelists include:

[UPDATE] CFP for Edited Collection: Primary Stein/Deadline Extended (Abstracts now through May 31, 2012)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 9, 2012 - 3:41pm
Janet Boyd (Fairleigh Dickinson University) and Sharon Kirsch (Arizona State University)

The overwhelming success of Gertrude Stein's The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas finally confirmed Stein's celebrity status in the United States in 1933. Yet she lamented that she had become known less as an important author than as the host of a Parisian salon in which famous writers and European painters gathered amidst her collection of modern art. Her earlier, more challenging writing continued to go unnoticed and unpublished despite the wide public appeal of the autobiography and the success of Virgil Thomson's production of Stein's opera Four Saints in Three Acts in 1934.

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