category: theory

[UPDATE] Transnational Laughter: Contemporary Film and TV Comedy across National Borders [second call]

full name / name of organization: 
David Scott Diffrient and Shelley Bradfield / Colorado State University
contact email: 
scott.diffrient@colostate.edu; shelley.bradfield@colostate.edu

My co-editor and I are seeking additional proposals and contributions for a collection of original essays entitled Transnational Laughter: Contemporary Film and TV Comedy across National Borders. We have already accepted several proposals, but are now looking specifically for contributions dealing with the transnational flow of comic forms and humor-based cultural texts within and across African, Middle Eastern, Southeast Asian, South American and Central American contexts.

As the first edited volume of its kind, Transnational Laughter seeks to expand the field of media studies and shed light on overlooked areas of academic interest, taking comedy and its various subgenres (including black comedy, improv, modern slapstick, the romcom, satire, scatological humor, sketch comedy, spoofs, stand-up, and so forth) as vehicles through which to assess the international transit of these specific cultural forms over the past 25-30 years.

The Undead (deadline 9/30/2011)

full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association
contact email: 
lindsay.bryde@gmail.com

This seminar seeks papers with strong analytical theses that offer readings of the undead phenomenon in literature and/or pop culture.

NEMLA 2012--Pedagogy versus Curriculum in the Evolving Literature Classroom [Due 9/30/11]

full name / name of organization: 
Diana H. Polley/Southern New Hampshire University
contact email: 
d.polley@snhu.edu

This roundtable seeks papers by those who have explored various pedagogical innovations in the literature classroom, particularly innovations that highlight literature’s relationship to “real-worl

[UPDATE] Deadline Reminder: Playing False: Representations of Betrayal, Oxford (27.05.2011)

full name / name of organization: 
Dr. Betiel Wasihun, Lincoln College, Oxford University
contact email: 
Betiel.wasihun@lincoln.ox.ac.uk

Reminder: May 27, 2011 deadline for abstracts.

PLAYING FALSE: REPRESENTATIONS OF BETRAYAL
LINCOLN COLLEGE, OXFORD UNIVERSITY SEPTEMBER 16 - 17, 2011

From Scroll to Screen: Translation and Reading from Ancient to Modern (Deadline July 15th, 2011.

full name / name of organization: 
University of British Columbia
contact email: 
siobhan.mcelduff@ubc.ca

What does Rome have to do with Cupertino? Or the bulky and unwieldy technology of the book scroll with the sleekness of the iPad?

[UPDATE] The Citizen-Subject Revisited: Oct. 24th Symposium w/ Keynote by E. Balibar

full name / name of organization: 
Jennifer Greiman / SUNY Albany
contact email: 
jgreiman@albany.edu

The Citizen-Subject Revisited

Special issue, MFS: Women's Fiction, New Modernist Studies and Feminism/3-1-2012

full name / name of organization: 
Anne Fernald
contact email: 
fernald@fordham.edu

Call for Papers: Upcoming Special issue
Women’s Fiction, New Modernist Studies, and Feminism

Editor: Anne Fernald
Deadline for Submission: 1 March 2012

NeMLA March 2012 - "Continuities in English Literature between the Norman Conquest and Reformation"

full name / name of organization: 
Pamela Longo and Brandon Hawk
contact email: 
pamela.longo@uconn.edu; brandon.hawk@uconn.edu

Too often, students of medieval English literature unnecessarily categorize Old and Middle English as completely disconnected, highlighting Beowulf and Chaucer as the exemplary markers, with little in

Alone Together/Together Alone UCLA Graduate Student Conference in French and Francophone Studies, Oct. 6-7 2011

full name / name of organization: 
UCLA Department of French and Francophone Studies Graduate Students
contact email: 
alonetogetherucla@gmail.com

Alone Together/Together Alone
16th Annual UCLA Graduate Student Conference October 6-7 2011 With Keynote Speaker Tom Conley (Harvard)

Human-Animal Relationships in Literature in the Nineteenth Century, NeMLA (9/30/11, 5/15-8/12)

full name / name of organization: 
Keridiana Chez
contact email: 
kerychez@gmail.com

Human-Animal Relationships in Literature in the Nineteenth Century

This panel explores how literature represents human subjectivity through interspecies relationships, to investigate how we produce ourselves by producing the animal producing us. To examine human-animal relations is to unearth the roots of what we understand today as the human. In the imperial/colonial context of the nineteenth-century, the representation of interspecies relationships (intimate or antagonistic) may establish the human/e as the rightful subject of dominion. At the same time, representations of animals may contest this material-semiotic imperialization. Using the works of authors like Rudyard Kipling, Jack London, Joseph Conrad, H. Rider Haggard, among others, we ask questions like: what are the connections between our concept of human empires—and relatedly, human rights—and evolving attitudes towards non-human animals? How does the century’s “civilized,” “humane” subject embody those rights by the management—social, cultural, legal and otherwise—of his relationships to “lower creation”? Approaches using affect theory and/or cultural, legal, or science studies are particularly welcome.

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