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The Cognitive Turn in Contemporary American Literature

updated: 
Thursday, May 17, 2012 - 10:29am
Northeast Modern Language Association

A growing number of sub-disciplines in literary studies engage cognitive studies and neuroscience. Affect studies, trauma studies, and memory studies are only some of the theoretical products of literary scholars' engagement with brain studies. This panel welcomes papers that explore cognitive and neuroscientific precepts as they emerge in contemporary American fiction and non-fiction.

2012 SAMLA Session, Deadline June 15: The Fragmented Form(s) and Context(s) of Modernist Poetics

updated: 
Wednesday, May 16, 2012 - 10:57pm
Travis Martin / University of Kentucky

This session will explore poetic Modernism in terms of form and context, examining its simultaneous subversion and incorporation of what came before. Papers are invited to deal with the evolution of the craft demonstrated by major poets like Eliot, Pound, and Yeats or later poets such as Auden, MacNeice, and David Jones. Alternatively, we invite papers on poetic forms as a reflection of or reaction to the destabilized rhetoric used in the liberal and conservative political maneuvers leading up to WWI.

[UPDATE] 27th Annual Interdisciplinary Conference in the Humanities: SYSTEMS OF CONTROL / MODES OF RESISTANCE, Nov. 1-3, 2012

updated: 
Wednesday, May 16, 2012 - 10:44pm
Robert Kilpatrick / University of West Georgia

NEW DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS--June 29, 2012

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Dr. Russell Berman (Stanford University)

How do various systems of authority (e.g. literary, political, sexual, cultural, economic, linguistic) seek to control individuals, groups, or cultural movements? How do individuals, groups, or cultural movements engage in resistance to subjection?

The Fragmented Form(s) and Context(s) of Modernist Poetics

updated: 
Wednesday, May 16, 2012 - 9:46pm
Travis Martin / SAMLA

This session will explore poetic Modernism in terms of form and context, examining its simultaneous subversion and incorporation of what came before. Papers are invited to deal with the evolution of the craft demonstrated by major poets like Eliot, Pound, and Yeats or later poets such as Auden, MacNeice, and David Jones. Alternatively, we invite papers on poetic forms as a reflection of or reaction to the destabilized rhetoric used in the liberal and conservative political maneuvers leading up to WWI.

[UPDATE] DIACRITICS: More than Global

updated: 
Wednesday, May 16, 2012 - 4:24pm
diacritics: A review of contemporary criticism

diacritics is launching a mini-series of thematic issues entitled "More than Global," to be published in volumes 41 and 42. "Humanists" may be facing an urgent task, or the discontinuous writing of what Susan Buck-Morss recently named a non-synthetic but "syncretic" take on world history and cultures. In this mini-series, we would like to bypass comparison, and go "more than global," in connecting discrete texts, phenomena, periods, images, languages, places—without unifying them. While certainly keeping in view the discourse of the social sciences, we seek to underscore the specificity of literary, critical, and philosophical thought in any sound attempt at reflecting on what "global" could mean anew.

[UPDATE] DIACRITICS: Thinking with the Sciences

updated: 
Wednesday, May 16, 2012 - 4:21pm
diacritics: A review of contemporary criticism

diacritics is launching a mini-series of thematic issues entitled "Thinking with the Sciences," to be published in volumes 41 and 42. We believe it is now time for scholars in the humanities and the literary disciplines to think with the sciences (and not against, or instead of them). Our title also suggests that epistemology is necessary but not sufficient; and that the promotion of an ancillary use of philosophy and the arts as illustrations or aesthetic adornments for "scientific knowledge" is not what matters. We welcome bold, broad, interdisciplinary, and theoretically sophisticated submissions that could be of relevance to this series.

Cinephilia/Cinephobia: New Mediations of Desire and Disgust | Nov. 9-11, 2012

updated: 
Wednesday, May 16, 2012 - 3:45pm
University of Pittsburgh Film Studies Graduate Student Organization (FSGSO)

Cinephilia/Cinephobia: New Mediations of Desire and Disgust
University of Pittsburgh, November 9-11, 2012
Hosted by the Film Studies Graduate Student Organization (FSGSO)
Deadline: June 15, 2012

Keynote by Christian Keathley, Professor of Film and Media Culture at Middlebury College. Keathley is author of Cinephilia and History, or The Wind in the Trees (Indiana University Press, 2006), and currently at work on a book titled The Mystery of Otto Preminger, under contract with IU Press.

[UPDATE] FRENZY! November 9-10, 2012

updated: 
Wednesday, May 16, 2012 - 1:24pm
York University English Graduate Students' Association

York University 2012 English Graduate Students' Association Colloquium:

FRENZY
November 9-10, 2012

Prophecies of a 2012 end of days; Black Friday at Wal-Mart; Howard Beale in Network inciting viewers to scream "I'm as mad as hell and I'm not going to take it anymore!" From mass hysteria to individual neuroses, the elusive nature of frenzy lends itself to dramatically different conceptualizations across the disciplines.

Call for Essays: Circulations of Religion and Medicine in North American Culture [Abstracts due July 15, 2012]

updated: 
Wednesday, May 16, 2012 - 10:04am
Ashley Reed and Kelly Bezio

As twenty-first-century critics we are inclined to think of medicine and religion as oppositional disciplines with incompatible approaches to the world. The "secularization thesis," promulgated in the work of Max Weber and other early-twentieth-century sociologists, has positioned scientific objectivity as replacing religious superstition, with medicine "switching sides" from a spiritual discourse controlled by ministers and shamans to a scientific one produced by doctors and researchers. But this relatively new thesis elides how, as anthropologist Linda L.

Edited Collection CfP: Pedagogies of the End: Teaching and Knowledge at the Fin de Siècle; Deadline: August 1, 2012

updated: 
Wednesday, May 16, 2012 - 9:53am
Daniel Bivona (Arizona State University), Helena Gurfinkel (Southern Illinois University Edwardsville)

Edited Collection CfP: Pedagogies of the End: Teaching and Knowledge at the Fin de Siècle

Co-Editors: Dan Bivona, Arizona State University, and Helena Gurfinkel, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

500-word abstracts and 1-paragraph bios to dbivona@asu.edu and hgurfin@siue.edu by August 1st, 2012.

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