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Call For Master's Level English and Cultural Studies Papers

updated: 
Tuesday, May 29, 2012 - 5:16pm
The Wide Net: A Master's Level Journal of Literature and Cultural Studies

The Wide Net, the country's first journal of exclusively Master's level research in English and cultural studies invites submissions for its summer issue: Bread and Circuses.

"Bread and Circuses": the possible catchphrase of all politics. The Romans used it in its most literal sense, yet our tribunes and senators still defer to its symbolic significance. While we constantly worry about our bread in these depressed economic times, we are also constantly subjected to a 24-hour view of the gladiatorial arena of our cultural circus. For our second issue we want to examine the contemporary cultural relevance of the phrase.

"Renaissance Que(e)ries: Un-disciplining the early modern body"

updated: 
Tuesday, May 29, 2012 - 11:44am
NeMLA 2013

In the recent anthology Shakesqueer (2011), Madhavi Menon claims, "Reading Shakespeare as queer rather than queered challenges the rule of chronology and identity that has thus far kept his poems and plays from exercising queer agency." This panel takes up Menon's urge to reconsider the relationship between queer theory and the early modern, welcoming papers that read early modern literature, both Shakespeare and beyond, as a body of queer texts, rather than historically distant productions at which we might look through a contemporary queer lens.

Book chapters for the interdisciplinary volume "Hip-Hop from the East of Europe"

updated: 
Tuesday, May 29, 2012 - 10:05am
Milosz Miszczynski / UCSD

The book responds to the vivid development of hip-hop culture in the Eastern and Central and Eastern European states and shows how a universal model of hip-hop serves as a contextually situated platform of cultural exchange with a number of meaningful and important functions and implications. The volume takes up the challenge of showing how hip-hop became an intrinsic element of urban environments in this part of the world, what impact it has on the mainstream culture and what functions it serves in different contexts. The book's content, besides tracking hip-hop's development, exhibits and explains hip-hop's functions and receptions of hip-hop in the national cultures in the spheres such as lifestyles, social structure, politics or consumer trends.

The Literary Present and the Postcolonial Condition An International Conference 14-16 November, 2012

updated: 
Tuesday, May 29, 2012 - 7:10am
Department of English, International Islamic University, Islamabad

At the end of the World War II, the British and the French territorial control over the colonies began to crumble and a new global condition emerged in which erstwhile colonies transformed into newly independent or created nation-states. The former colonial masters, having relinquished territorial occupation, devised cultural and economic models of control that divided the world into developed and developing parts, similar to the division into the civilized and the savage parts in the colonial era. Originally literary and cultural theorists favoured violence as a necessary part of decolonization and freedom.

MAPACA Conference 2012 Women's Studies Area

updated: 
Monday, May 28, 2012 - 10:41pm
Mid-Atlantic Popular and American Culture Association

CFP Women's Studies at MAPACA
Mid-Atlantic Popular/American Culture Association Conference
November 1-3, 2012
Pittsburgh,PA

Women's Studies as a discipline acknowledges the interdisciplinary approaches to discussing issues that affect women. The Women's Studies area of MAPACA seeks papers, panels and roundtables that investigate and discuss any of the many overlaps between gender and popular culture. Topics for this area include, but certainly are not limited to:

Midwest MLA What is Our Debt to Death and the Dead?: The Gift of Death and The Work of Mourning in Literature

updated: 
Monday, May 28, 2012 - 3:15pm
Jack Taylor Michigan State University

Jacques Derrida argues that the dead other can speak and remain "in us." Additionally, he argues that to keep one alive is the ultimate sign of fidelity that is accomplished through acts of mourning that necessitate the interiorization of the dead other. In a way, then, Derrida suggests that the living owe a debt to the dead: we must keep them alive, we must keep them "in us." This particular panel seeks papers that attempt to formulate and read the gift of death and the living's debt to the dead in literature. How has literature reckoned with death? Can literature do the work of mourning? How has literature represented the livings' debt to the dead? These are some of the questions this panel seeks to investigate.

"Debts to the Moor: Citations of Shakespeare's Othello" Deadline 07/02/2012

updated: 
Sunday, May 27, 2012 - 12:38pm
Midwest MLA Convention, November 8-11, 2012, Theme: Debt

Debts to the Moor: Influences, Adaptations, and Citations of Shakepeare's Othello

This panel invites theoretical inquiry and/or performance analyses of appropriations of William Shakespeare's Othello in film, popular culture and/or foreign non-English adaptations. Some questions to consider are: What methodologies are employed when considering the expectations of local audiences producing and consuming the adaptation? What contextual influences inform the reiteration of Othello in a range of performance venues? What literary debts are acknowledged when Othello is cited in popular culture, in widely distributed English films, and/or in foreign performances for non-English speaking audiences?

Women, Culture, and the 25th January 2011 Egyptian Revolution - 15-17 November 2012 (The University of Manchester)

updated: 
Saturday, May 26, 2012 - 8:22am
Dr Dalia Said Mostafa (Manchester University), and Dr Shuruq Naguib (Lancaster University)

This is a call for papers for two related workshops which will take place in November 2012 (at the University of Manchester) and in March 2013 (in Cairo). This project is funded by the CBRL-BRISMES Research Network (UK), with the aim of emphasising the leading role of Egyptian women activists, writers, and artists in the revolutionary process. In this context, we perceive the 25th January Egyptian Revolution as a process in the making: there were many important catalysts for the revolution over the past decade in Egypt manifested in a significant rise in street protests and demonstrations by large sectors in the society (e.g.

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