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Rethinking the Human Sciences

updated: 
Sunday, June 28, 2009 - 2:11pm
Humanities Research Group, University of Windsor / Humanities Centre, Wayne State University

Rethinking the Human Sciences

Early Modern Dramatic and Literary Spaces [11/06/09 - 11/07/09]

updated: 
Sunday, June 28, 2009 - 12:57pm
California State University Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies

The California State University Long Beach Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies with the cooperation of UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, UC Irvine Group for the Study of Early Cultures, and USC Early Modern Studies Institute

Is pleased to announce a conference for fall 2009 to be held on the campus of CSULB, Friday and Saturday, November 6 & 7

"Early Modern Dramatic and Literary Spaces." Possible topics for panels and seminar discussion include:

A MICHAEL JACKSON READER Essays on Popular Music, Sexuality, And Culture

updated: 
Friday, June 26, 2009 - 4:18pm
Christopher R. Smit, Ph.D.

Throughout his 40 year career, Michael Jackson intrigued and captivated public imagination through music ingenuity, sexual and racial spectacle, savvy publicity stunts, odd private (yet always public) behaviors, and a seemingly apolitical (yet always political) offering of popular art. Since the age of ten, Jackson was a consistent player on the public stage – countless public appearances, both designed and serendipitous, no doubt shaped the consciousness of this performer. The evidence we have of this shaping is seen in the artifacts he has left behind: music, interviews, books written by him, about him, a number of commercial products including dolls, buttons, posters, and photographs, videos, movies.

Race and Narrative in 20th Century Literature (09/30/2009; NeMLA 04/07/2010-04/11/2010)

updated: 
Friday, June 26, 2009 - 4:06pm
Northeast MLA

This panel seeks to explore the intersections between narrative studies and race in twentieth century literature. In what ways can ethnic studies and narrative studies assist one another in the understanding of complex narratives addressing racial identity? Please send abstracts and brief biographical statements to James J. Donahue at donahujj@potsdam.edu.

Journal of Popular Romance Studies: First Call for Papers

updated: 
Friday, June 26, 2009 - 3:40pm
Kymberly Hinton / Journal of Popular Romance Studies

For its inaugural issue (Winter 2010), the Journal of Popular Romance Studies is now considering papers on representations of romantic love in popular media, now or in the past, from anywhere in the world.

Topics addressed might include:

CFP: AS SEEN ON TV: A SPECIAL SECTION IN JDTC's SPRING 2010 ISSUE

updated: 
Friday, June 26, 2009 - 2:09pm
Journal of Dramatic Theory and Criticism

CALL FOR PAPERS
AS SEEN ON TV: A SPECIAL SECTION IN JDTC's SPRING 2010 ISSUE
Brian Herrera and Henry Bial, Guest Editors

For this special section of the Journal of Dramatic Theory and Criticism, we invite essays of 20-25 manuscript pages, exclusive of notes, exploring the intersection of broadcast television with live theatre and performance.

[UPDATE] Motion Comics [SCMS Panel] 7/31/09; 3/17/10-3/21/10; Los Angeles

updated: 
Thursday, June 25, 2009 - 10:31pm
Dr. Douglas A. Cunningham

Motion comics are (in most cases) digitized, panel-by-panel, animated translations of comic books or graphic novels. This new medium has gained high visibility most recently as a result of Warner Bros.' adaption of D.C.'s WATCHMEN into the motion comics format as part of the studio's overall efforts to promote the live-action film version of the famed graphic novel. Several additional comics have, however, been adapted into this format, including BATMAN: BLACK AND WHITE, STEPHEN KING'S "N.", I AM LEGEND, SPIDER WOMAN, and ASTONISHING X-MEN, among many others.

Mystical Bridges to Postmodernity: Toward a Critical Theology? (9-15-09; Medieval Congress in Kalamazoo, May 2010)

updated: 
Thursday, June 25, 2009 - 5:54pm
Timothy M. Asay, University of Oregon

There's nothing new under the sun—-including this aphorism—-though each generation seems to rediscover old thought-ways, contributing to them a rhetoric of novelty. This panel seeks to explore the ways in which critical philosophy of the past forty years has reduplicated and reconfigured the revelations of theology, especially (though not exclusively) mystical and contemplative theology. Discussions could range from the "negative theology" of the later Derrida to the mystical psychology of the Real in Lacan, or the scholasticism of structuralism. The goal is not only to "apply" the current critical lexicon to theology, but to show how spiritual texts can meaningfully comment upon and enrich our experience of critical theory.

[UPDATE] "Catastrophe and the Cure": The Politics of Post-9/11 Music (Deadline July 1, 2009)

updated: 
Thursday, June 25, 2009 - 9:30am
Anthology Theorizing Post-9/11 Music

In current debates about the War in Iraq, it has become commonplace for politicians and journalists to conjure the specter of the Vietnam War as a means of quantifying the impact of the current war in American culture and throughout the world. Surprisingly, though, few have scrutinized these comparisons to examine the differences between the popular music of the Vietnam era and the music of the current post-9/11 era. While the Vietnam era found countless bands and musicians responding in protest to that war, there has arguably been a significantly smaller amount of contemporary musicians who have taken overt stances, in their music, about the politics of post-9/11 life, in America and elsewhere.

[UPDATE] Extended deadline - JUNE 30 Steampunk! Revisions of Time and Technology. SAMLA 11/6-11/9 2009

updated: 
Thursday, June 25, 2009 - 9:25am
Kathryn Crowther / SAMLA

I am looking for one more paper to complete this SAMLA special session panel. I welcome papers on any aspect of the Steampunk genre. Papers could address literature, film, art, or other cultural manifestations of Steampunk. Of particular interest are discussions of the ways that Steampunk engages with notions of time and historical discourse, the materiality of Steampunk, and the intersections of technology and literature. By June 1, please send a one-page abstract that includes audio/visual needs and a short vita (with complete contact information) to Kathryn Crowther, Georgia Institute of Technology at kathryn.crowther@lcc.gatech.edu

Forms and Theories of Allegory between Middle Age and Modernity – International conference in Trento, December, 9-11 2009

updated: 
Thursday, June 25, 2009 - 5:32am
Scuola di dottorato in Studi letterari, linguistici e filologici – Carlo Tirinanzi de Medici

-- English text -- please see below for other languages --

Allegory: Theories and Forms between Middle Age and Modernity

The notion of allegory is a pivotal one to understand Western literature, either the medieval one by which allegory was institutionalized within the four layers system of textual hermeneutics (literal, moral, allegorical, and anagogical), or in the modern texts which have been often interpreted, at least from Benjamin forward, as allegorical texts.

The Past's Digital Presence: Database, Archive, and Knowledge Work in the Humanities (A Graduate Student Symposium)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 24, 2009 - 4:25pm
Yale University Graduate School of Arts & Sciences, the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, the Whitney Humanities Center

How is digital technology changing methods of scholarly research with pre-digital sources in the humanities? If the "medium is the message," then how does the message change when primary sources are translated into digital media? What kinds of new research opportunities do databases unlock and what do they make obsolete? What is the future of the rare book and manuscript library and its use? What biases are inherent in the widespread use of digitized material? How can we correct for them? Amidst numerous benefits in accessibility, cost, and convenience, what concerns have been overlooked?

CITYSCAPES/LITERARY ESCAPES// COLLOQUE URBANITÉS LITTÉRAIRES, September 10-12, 2009, University at Buffalo

updated: 
Wednesday, June 24, 2009 - 10:57am
University at BUffalo/Formules Journal



CITYSCAPES/LITERARY ESCAPES// COLLOQUE URBANITÉS LITTÉRAIRES

The University at Buffalo (SUNY) in collaboration with the journal Formules (Paris) will host an international conference on "Urbanités Littéraires" / "Cityscapes/Literary Escapes."

The goal of the conference is to study relations between writing and the urban environment, and specify interactive engagements between literature, architecture, and urbanism. Principle aspects to be examined are:

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