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Not Here Not There - Deadline: January 31, 2012

updated: 
Friday, January 27, 2012 - 5:06am
Leonardo Electronic Almanac (Leonardo/ISAST)

Leonardo Electronic Almanac in collaboration with The Samek Art Gallery and with Kasa Gallery announces a special issue titled: Not Here Not There. This issue arises out of the territory between two cultural streams.

Speed, Dromology and Invisibility? - Deadline: January 31, 2012

updated: 
Friday, January 27, 2012 - 5:04am
Leonardo Electronic Almanac (Leonardo/ISAST)

From the futurist's speed through contemporary dromology to the disappearance of the human body? What are the future trajectories of a continuous process of acceleration? Is the disappearance of the body through artificial speed a process of invisibility or that of a visibility through acceleration?

The instantaneous communication across Web 2.0 and the speed of interactions has created the feeling of a contradiction between an idea of constant presence and that of the disappearance of the body in a constant trajectory of 'self-dissemination.' In 1909 the futurists envisaged a new world and some of their far-fetched visionary ideas have come to pass. What is the role that speed will play in the future of humanity in the twenty-first century?

Bright Lines: Culture On the Autistic Spectrum

updated: 
Thursday, January 26, 2012 - 11:38pm
Jes Battis, Assistant Professor, Department of English

"Am I on the spectrum?" asks Abed Nadir, a character on the show Community. He then provides an answer: "None of your business." His joke presumes that the audience will understand this reference to the autism spectrum, and Community introduces the topic of Asperger's Syndrome in its pilot episode. Since the publication of Temple Grandin's work on autism in 1986, there has been a textual explosion of work on Asperger's Syndrome and the autism spectrum. Changes to the DSM-V will replace Asperger's Syndrome with Autistic Spectrum Disorder, a broadening that could threaten the culture that aspie/AS-identified people have produced in the form of literature and visual media. This volume would explore representations of autism within popular culture.

CFP: Death and Dying in Literature (4/1/02; collection of essays)

updated: 
Thursday, January 26, 2012 - 7:28pm
John J. Han & C. Clark Triplett

Previously unpublished critical essays are being sought for a new volume tentatively entitled The Final Crossing: Death and Dying in Literature. Since the publication of Dr. Elisabeth Kübler-Ross's landmark study On Death and Dying (1969), thanatology has attracted keen attention from various fields of study, including psychology, psychiatry, sociology, gerontology, and medical ethics. Interestingly, thanatologists in those areas frequently turn to literature in their study of death and the phenomena and practices related to it. Considering that death and dying is a prominent theme, motif, and symbol in world literature, it is no wonder that they find literary works resourceful.

[UPDATE] CFP - This Rough Magic - Essays

updated: 
Thursday, January 26, 2012 - 4:40pm
www.thisroughmagic.org

This Rough Magic is a journal dedicated to the art of teaching Medieval and Renaissance Literature. We are seeking academic, teachable articles that focus on, but are not limited to, the following categories:

•Authorship
•Genre Issues
•Narrative Structure
•Poetry
•Drama
•Epic
•Nation/Empire/Class
•Economics
•History
•Religion
•Superstition
•Philosophy and Rhetoric
•Race/Ethnicity
•Multi-Culturalism
•Gender
•Sexuality
•Art

For more information, please visit our website:
www.thisroughmagic.org

[UPDATE] "Rough Music": Representing Violence (March 31, 2012)

updated: 
Thursday, January 26, 2012 - 4:31pm
Southern Methodist University English Graduate Students

In The Plague of Fantasies, Slavoj Žižek describes Lacan's readings of classical, literary, and philosophical texts as "a case of violent appropriation…displacing the work from its proper hermeneutic context." And yet, he argues, "this very violent gesture brings about a breathtaking 'effect of truth'" and "a shattering new insight."

This conference, hosted by the English Department at Southern Methodist University, invites graduate students to interpret and explore the function of violence in all of its multitudinous forms, including, but not limited to, its function in literature. We invite proposals for consideration that reflect any and all interdisciplinary explorations of violence as trope, historical event or discursive technique.

CFP - Comics & Cultural Theory (REMINDER)

updated: 
Thursday, January 26, 2012 - 3:33am
Studies in Comics

From Akira to Žižek: Comics and Contemporary Cultural Theory

Papers are invited for Studies in Comics volume 3.2. This special issue seeks to provide a forum for new articulations between comics studies and contemporary cultural theory. The importance and continued relevance of post-structuralist/postmodernist thought, the Frankfurt school's studies of mass culture, McLuhan's media theory and Bourdieu's critical sociology are rightly acknowledged. Such figures dominate theoretical academic discourse on comics, as in other areas of cultural studies, often at the expense of engagement with alternative strands of critical thinking.

[UPDATE] Essays for Edited Collection: "'Their Lives a Storm Wheron They Ride': Writing With the Affective Disorders"

updated: 
Wednesday, January 25, 2012 - 11:20pm
Stephanie Stone Horton, Georgia State University

The link between the affective disorders (depression and bipolar illness) and writing creativity goes back to Aristotle, who famously asked, "Why is it that all men who are outstanding in philosophy, poetry and the arts are melancholic? Indeed, a fifteen-year study at the Iowa Writers' Workshop found that 80 percent of the writers lived with affective illness, or had experienced an episode at some point in their lives (this compared to only 30 percent of non-writer controls). Writers and poets with known and suspected affective disorder span the centuries; the twentieth gave us Woolf, Hemingway, Dylan Thomas, Robert Lowell, Anne Sexton, David Foster Wallace, and scores of others.

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