Subscribe to RSS - theory

theory

CFP: Death and Dying in Literature (4/1/02; collection of essays)

updated: 
Thursday, January 26, 2012 - 7:28pm
John J. Han & C. Clark Triplett

Previously unpublished critical essays are being sought for a new volume tentatively entitled The Final Crossing: Death and Dying in Literature. Since the publication of Dr. Elisabeth Kübler-Ross's landmark study On Death and Dying (1969), thanatology has attracted keen attention from various fields of study, including psychology, psychiatry, sociology, gerontology, and medical ethics. Interestingly, thanatologists in those areas frequently turn to literature in their study of death and the phenomena and practices related to it. Considering that death and dying is a prominent theme, motif, and symbol in world literature, it is no wonder that they find literary works resourceful.

[UPDATE] CFP - This Rough Magic - Essays

updated: 
Thursday, January 26, 2012 - 4:40pm
www.thisroughmagic.org

This Rough Magic is a journal dedicated to the art of teaching Medieval and Renaissance Literature. We are seeking academic, teachable articles that focus on, but are not limited to, the following categories:

•Authorship
•Genre Issues
•Narrative Structure
•Poetry
•Drama
•Epic
•Nation/Empire/Class
•Economics
•History
•Religion
•Superstition
•Philosophy and Rhetoric
•Race/Ethnicity
•Multi-Culturalism
•Gender
•Sexuality
•Art

For more information, please visit our website:
www.thisroughmagic.org

[UPDATE] "Rough Music": Representing Violence (March 31, 2012)

updated: 
Thursday, January 26, 2012 - 4:31pm
Southern Methodist University English Graduate Students

In The Plague of Fantasies, Slavoj Žižek describes Lacan's readings of classical, literary, and philosophical texts as "a case of violent appropriation…displacing the work from its proper hermeneutic context." And yet, he argues, "this very violent gesture brings about a breathtaking 'effect of truth'" and "a shattering new insight."

This conference, hosted by the English Department at Southern Methodist University, invites graduate students to interpret and explore the function of violence in all of its multitudinous forms, including, but not limited to, its function in literature. We invite proposals for consideration that reflect any and all interdisciplinary explorations of violence as trope, historical event or discursive technique.

CFP - Comics & Cultural Theory (REMINDER)

updated: 
Thursday, January 26, 2012 - 3:33am
Studies in Comics

From Akira to Žižek: Comics and Contemporary Cultural Theory

Papers are invited for Studies in Comics volume 3.2. This special issue seeks to provide a forum for new articulations between comics studies and contemporary cultural theory. The importance and continued relevance of post-structuralist/postmodernist thought, the Frankfurt school's studies of mass culture, McLuhan's media theory and Bourdieu's critical sociology are rightly acknowledged. Such figures dominate theoretical academic discourse on comics, as in other areas of cultural studies, often at the expense of engagement with alternative strands of critical thinking.

[UPDATE] Essays for Edited Collection: "'Their Lives a Storm Wheron They Ride': Writing With the Affective Disorders"

updated: 
Wednesday, January 25, 2012 - 11:20pm
Stephanie Stone Horton, Georgia State University

The link between the affective disorders (depression and bipolar illness) and writing creativity goes back to Aristotle, who famously asked, "Why is it that all men who are outstanding in philosophy, poetry and the arts are melancholic? Indeed, a fifteen-year study at the Iowa Writers' Workshop found that 80 percent of the writers lived with affective illness, or had experienced an episode at some point in their lives (this compared to only 30 percent of non-writer controls). Writers and poets with known and suspected affective disorder span the centuries; the twentieth gave us Woolf, Hemingway, Dylan Thomas, Robert Lowell, Anne Sexton, David Foster Wallace, and scores of others.

Edge: A Graduate Journal for German and Scandinavian Studies is accepting submissions for its third edition

updated: 
Wednesday, January 25, 2012 - 9:15pm
Edge: A Graduate Journal for German and Scandinavian Studies

Edge: A Graduate Journal for German and Scandinavian Studies is
accepting submissions for its third edition. We are seeking
original scholarly research as well as book and film reviews.
Edge is a peer-reviewed, open access, interdisciplinary graduate
student journal. The journal is published annually under the
direction of graduate students in the German and Scandinavian
Studies program at the University of Massachusetts Amherst with
the support of the W.E.B.DuBois Library.

"The Violence of the Image," April 26-27, 2012

updated: 
Wednesday, January 25, 2012 - 6:56pm
Department of Comparative Literature, State University of New York at Buffalo

"The Violence of the Image," Second Annual Comparative Literature Graduate Conference, State University of New York at Buffalo

Although the tradition of thinking about the image in philosophy and aesthetics goes all the way back to Plato and Aristotle there have recently been numerous critical approaches that depart from this tradition and envision the image as neither a copy of a copy nor as an ideological formation. The Graduate Conference "The Violence of the Image" seeks to further these new insights into the nature of the image.

Pages