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This is Nowhere: Local, Regional and Provincial Spaces in World Literature - 24 October 2009 (Deadline: June 1st 2009)

updated: 
Sunday, April 12, 2009 - 5:33pm
UC Berkeley, Graduate Program in Comparative Literature

For all their complexity, recent discussions of cosmopolitanism, comparativism, and world literature have tended to privilege the global over the local, the macro over the micro, and the city over the country. These discussions have prompted us to ask some of the following questions: what constitutes a small town, region, province, village, settlement, or other small-scale community? How have these and other terms historically been used by the cultural centers from which most discourse is generated? What does it mean to speak or write from a local or regional community within the context of the world republic of letters? How is this related to or different from writing for a small-scale community?

European Journal of English Studies, Vol. 15 Matter and Material Culture 2011

updated: 
Sunday, April 12, 2009 - 2:50am
Università degli studi della Calabria; Università degli studi di Salerno; Routledge

European Journal of English Studies, Vol. 15
Matter and Material Culture
Deadline for proposals: 13 November 2009

Guest Editors: Maurizio Calbi & Marilena Parlati.

Cultural materialism has been adding much to our knowledge and understanding of the ways in which culture is informed by and conformed to and with matter, and so have the numerous analyses and histories of material culture from fields as varied as sociology, anthropology, museum studies, consumer studies, and so forth.

The Literary Menagerie

updated: 
Saturday, April 11, 2009 - 7:05pm
Jeanne Dubino and Ziba Rashidian

You are invited to contribute to an edited volume entitled "The Literary Menagerie." The last decade has seen an intensive scholarly engagement with the question of the human-non-human animal relation, including its artistic and literary representation. This foundational scholarship has made it possible to pursue more focused areas of inquiry. One such area is suggested by Randy Malamud in his "Becoming Animal": "art has the potential to present a valuable . . . account of what it is like to be a different animal from ourselves" (7). Art makes it possible for us to imagine ourselves into another being and also to discover other ways of being human.

Remixing Critical Theory: Literacy Theory as Literary Criticism; 4Cs / CCCC 2010 Panel; 4/22

updated: 
Friday, April 10, 2009 - 3:20pm
Nicole duPlessis / Texas A&M University

Eldred and Mortensen, in their article "Reading Literacy Narratives" published in College English (1992), call for the movement of literacy studies "in one important direction: into the study of literary texts" (512). Toward this goal, the article identifies categories of literacy-centered literary texts: the "literacy myth," "narratives of socialization," "literature of the contact zone," and "literacy narratives" (Eldred and Mortensen 512-513). However, to date, this article has failed to make a significant impact on literary criticism.

Speaking of Grief: Death and Language in Modernism (MSA 11, 5-8 November 2009, Montréal, Québec, Canada)

updated: 
Thursday, April 9, 2009 - 10:00pm
Daniel Moore (Queen's University, Canada)

If the Holocaust motivated aesthetic theorists and writers to rethink the premise of the literary mode altogether, stated in one form by Theodore Adorno in his 1951 claim that to write "poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric," early-twentieth-century writers tended to respond to the most violent and rife deaths of their time by zeroing in on words themselves. We may find the most prominent meeting of fatality and diction in the modernist period in attacks on languages of militarism and commemoration launched from a host of quarters, in particular by ex-servicemen following the Great War.

Matter '09: A Creative Theology Event and Anthology (Deadline May 15, 2009) Conference: Sept. 17-19, 2009

updated: 
Thursday, April 9, 2009 - 7:20pm
Shechem Ministries, Inc.

Shechem Ministries' "Matter '09: A Creative Theology Event" is now accepting submissions of papers and artwork for the conference September 17-19, 2009, at the Seminary of the Southwest in Austin, Texas.

Selected papers and artwork will be presented at the conference and will be published in the anthology of the conference, Matter, published by Shechem Press.

CFP: Humor & Horror/SF/Fantasy - Detroit, MI, 10.30-11.1.09

updated: 
Thursday, April 9, 2009 - 6:03pm
Midwest PCA/ACA

Dear Humor / Horror, SF, Fantasy Scholar:

You are invited to submit a paper to the Midwest Popular Culture Association / American Culture Association annual meetings being held at the Book Cadillac Westin Hotel, Detroit, Michigan, from Friday through Sunday, October 30-November 1, 2009.

More details about the conference, the hotel and its rates can be found at the MPCA / MACA website.

Literacy Narrative(s) and Human Dignity; Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC / 4Cs); Deadline 4/22

updated: 
Thursday, April 9, 2009 - 4:53pm
Nicole duPlessis / Texas A&M University


This panel submission to the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) will examine literacy narratives (broadly defined) that show a link between human dignity and the acquisition or practice of literacy (reading or writing), or the influence of literacy on interpersonal communication and relationships. In particular, we are interested in

*Links (positive or negative) between literacy (the ability to read and/or write) and human dignity

*Portrayals in narrative fiction or creative nonfiction of the acts of reading and writing as a means to understanding of human dignity

*Literate techniques of interaction ("reading" others' actions or personalities) as a means of humanizing or dehumanizing the Other

Disposable Culture and Spaces of Consumption in Medieval Europe

updated: 
Thursday, April 9, 2009 - 4:31pm
Rebecca Flynn and Salvatore Musumeci

Call for Papers:
Disposable Culture and Spaces of Consumption in Medieval Europe
For the annual meeting of the Medieval Academy will be held 18-21 March 2010, on Yale University Campus, New Haven, hosted by Connecticut College, Southern Connecticut State University, Trinity College (Hartford), University of Connecticut, Wesleyan University, and Yale University.

Nineteenth Century Popular Culture Panel - Proposals May 1 2009 - Conference October 30-November 1 2009

updated: 
Thursday, April 9, 2009 - 4:18pm
Midwest Popular Culture Association / American Culture Association

The MPCA/ACA is seeking paper proposals that address any aspect of 19th century American popular culture. We are especially interested in papers that focus on culture from a specific critical perspective; however, no particular approach is required. Possible topics include (but are not limited to):
- Literature
- Dime novels
- Politics
- Sports
- Religion
- Westward expansion
- Native Americans
- Women in popular culture
- Entertainment

Send a 250-word abstract along with full contact information to panel chair, Patrick Prominski (pprominski@gmail.com). Be sure to include MPCA/ACA in the subject header. Deadline for submissions is May 1, 2009.

[UPDATE] "Catastrophe and the Cure": The Politics of Post-9/11 Music (Deadline May 1, 2009)

updated: 
Thursday, April 9, 2009 - 11:53am
Anthology Theorizing Post-9/11 Music

In current debates about the War in Iraq, it has become commonplace for politicians and journalists to conjure the specter of the Vietnam War as a means of quantifying the impact of the current war in American culture and throughout the world. Surprisingly, though, few have scrutinized these comparisons to examine the differences between the popular music of the Vietnam era and the music of the current post-9/11 era. While the Vietnam era found countless bands and musicians responding in protest to that war, there has arguably been a significantly smaller amount of contemporary musicians who have taken overt stances, in their music, about the politics of post-9/11 life, in America and elsewhere.

Re(Viewing) the Landscape of Visual Rhetoric: Topics in Visual Rhetoric; SAMLA Conf. Nov 6-8, 2009; Abstracts Due May 31, 2009

updated: 
Thursday, April 9, 2009 - 11:52am
Mary Hocks, English Dept, Georgia State University

RE(VIEWING) THE LANDSCAPE OF VISUAL RHETORIC: TOPICS IN VISUAL RHETORIC
The SAMLA special session on visual rhetoric welcomes paper, panel, and performance proposals on topics that deal with all aspects of visual rhetoric, such as visual culture and the Web; teaching visual rhetoric in the classroom; image use in blogs; exploring identities with visual rhetoric; visual rhetoric in student writing; (re)presentations of the body; visual rhetoric in politics; visual rhetoric of physical spaces; visual rhetoric and environmental issues; and other relevant topics.

DIVERSIFICATION AND ITS DISCONTENTS: DYNAMICS OF THE DISCIPLINE

updated: 
Thursday, April 9, 2009 - 11:46am
Czech Association for the Study of English (CZASE), Department of English, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic

CALL FOR PAPERS
DIVERSIFICATION AND ITS DISCONTENTS:
DYNAMICS OF THE DISCIPLINE
9th Brno International Conference of English, American and Canadian Studies
Organized and hosted by:
Czech Association for the Study of English (CZASE)
Department of English and American Studies, Masaryk University, Brno
Brno, Czech Republic
4 – 6 February 2010
Keynote Speakers: Andreas H. Jucker (Universität Zürich)
Nigel Leask (University of Glasgow)
Martin Hilský (Charles University, Prague)

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