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In the Margin: e-text and its readers (proposals 30 April 2012)

updated: 
Tuesday, February 21, 2012 - 3:06pm
Drs. Ann-Barbara Graff and Kristin Lucas

We solicit contributions for an edited collection of scholarly essays entitled In the Margin: e-Text and its readers. Considerable scholarship of the past three decades has addressed the history, readership, and materiality of the book. The architecture of the page, paperstock, fount, blank spaces, and readerly annotation have been the subject of economic, material, and theoretical analysis. Attention to how books have been copied, signed, and annotated has illuminated a history of reading and literary activity. The codex, in short, has been invaluable to the material turn in bibliographic and literary scholarship. But what of the digital turn?

CFP: American Humor (Due March 1)

updated: 
Tuesday, February 21, 2012 - 2:18pm
RMMLA

This panel welcomes papers on any topics pertaining to humor in American literature and culture. Please send 250-word abstracts to Julie Wilhelm at jawilhelm@my.lamar.edu by March 1st. The RMMLA meets in Boulder, Colorado on October 11-13, 2012.

[UPDATE] CFP: At the Round Table (food writing)

updated: 
Tuesday, February 21, 2012 - 12:50pm
Dr. Adrienne P. Lamberti / University of Northern Iowa

Among scholarly, trade, and popular texts, food has been addressed as (among other frames) a luxurious preoccupation, a class marker, and an overdue opportunity to give attention to a key cultural artifact.

Ecocriticism panel at RMMLA Oct 11-13, 2012

updated: 
Tuesday, February 21, 2012 - 12:05am
Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association

Inspired by the growing membership in international chapters of ASLE and the global effects of climate change and social injustice, this panel seeks papers with an international and cross-cultural ecocritical perspective.

Please submit paper proposals by March 1, 2012 to Ali Brox at ali_brox@yahoo.com.

For more information about the RMMLA convention in Boulder, Colorado, please visit: www.rmmla.org

[UPDATE] Debt: Money/Narrative/Belief (August 17-19, 2012)

updated: 
Monday, February 20, 2012 - 9:55pm
Dalhousie Association of Graduate Students in English (DAGSE)

[Update] - We are happy to announce our keynote speakers:
● Glenn Willmott (Queens University), author of Modern Animalism: Habitats of Scarcity and Wealth in Comics and Literature (University of Toronto Press, 2011) and Modernist Goods: Primitivism, the Market, and the Gift (University of Toronto Press, 2008);

● Len Diepeveen (Dalhousie University), author of Artworld Prestige: Arguing Cultural Value (co-author Timothy van Laar. Forthcoming, Oxford, 2012) and The Difficulties of Modernism (Routledge, 2003);

[UPDATE] Politics of Form in the Transpacific - MLA Boston (01/03 - 01/06)

updated: 
Monday, February 20, 2012 - 9:08pm
Modern Language Association - Special Session

Special session explores political dimensions of literary form in the material and cultural context of transpacific exchange; how are the aesthetics of various genres (fiction, non-fiction, autobiography, memoir, poetry, etc) differentially implicated and utilized within the historical terrain of the transpacific? Attention to texts in various Pacific Rim languages welcome.

300-word abstract and c.v. by 03/10 to Steven Yao (syao@hamilton.edu) and Janice Tong (tong14@illinois.edu)

 

Conversational Exchanges in Early Modern England

updated: 
Monday, February 20, 2012 - 4:36pm
MLA 2013

Explores the "dynamic and performative process of dialogic engagement" (Katherine Lawson) as a collaborative, compositional methodology. Possible topics: synchronic vs. diachronic imitatio; conversational circles (interpersonal or intertextual); cognitive models. Please send 250-word abstracts to kristen.bennett@tufts.edu or dianne.berg@tufts.edu. Deadline: 3/15/12.

The Aesthetics of Debt

updated: 
Monday, February 20, 2012 - 2:00pm
Special Session / MLA 2013 (Boston)

Seeking papers for a panel exploring the interconnections of aesthetic and economic debt. What exactly does the trope of "literary debt" owe to the economic mind? Are economic narratives, e.g.- the narrative of money as "value itself," indebted to aesthetic principles?

Papers welcome on topics such as the post-collapse relevance of Harold Bloom's theory of literary influence, Marc Shell's deconstructions of the "Art & Money" binary, and Christian Marazzi's notion of the increasingly "linguistic" nature of capital.

Send 300-word abstract and brief bio by 15 March 2012 to Mark Schiebe, CUNY Graduate Center (mschiebe@gc.cuny.edu)

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