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CFP: Inaugural Bangor Conference of Celtic Studies, 21-23 July 2012

updated: 
Sunday, January 1, 2012 - 12:31pm
Dr Katharine Olson/ Bangor University

CALL FOR PAPERS

THE INAUGURAL BANGOR CONFERENCE OF CELTIC STUDIES
21 JULY — 23 JULY 2012
BANGOR UNIVERSITY, NORTH WALES

An international conference welcoming papers in Welsh and English on topics relating to any aspect of Celtic Studies, including (but not limited to) history, archaeology, language, literature, linguistics, music, religion, philosophy, folklore, art history, anthropology, and gender studies. A selection of the conference proceedings will be published.

A book of collected essays on humour

updated: 
Sunday, January 1, 2012 - 9:17am
Shun-liang Chao / National Chengchi University

Call for Papers
A book of collected essays on humour
Edited by Dr Vivienne Westbrook (National Taiwan University, Taiwan) and Dr Shun-liang Chao (National Chengchi University, Taiwan)

Call for Ecocritical Essay, Poem, Fiction, & more!

updated: 
Friday, December 30, 2011 - 3:29pm
Kudzu Review

Kudzu Review is gathering materials for the Summer Solstice Issue: 1.2. This southern, biannual, online, literary ecojournal searches constantly for work that is outstanding and motivated by concerns with human's place in the world. We are interested in pieces which push boundaries, which avoid overt or cliché messages, and which embrace and embody the interdisciplinary nature of ecocriticism.

Deadline: April 1st, for Summer Solstice 1.2.
Any materials received after this date will be considered for the Winter Solstice, Issue 2.1.

For more information about our organization & to view past issues and guidelines, visit us at www.kudzureview.com

20th and 21st century Quebec studies

updated: 
Friday, December 30, 2011 - 2:27pm
PAMLA - Special Session - Oct. 19-21, 2012

110th Annual PAMLA Convention
Seattle University
Seattle, Washington
October 19-21, 2012

Special Session:

20th and 21 century Quebec studies

Renaissance Borders, Princeton University, April 13-14, 2012

updated: 
Friday, December 30, 2011 - 12:52pm
Princeton University Renaissance Studies

From the beginning, conceptualizations of the Renaissance have been concerned with borders: between the classical past and the modern present; between pagan and Christian; between the civilized and the barbarous. Even as the idea of the Renaissance has endured various critiques over the past half century, this attention to borders has only intensified. In current debates about secularization and periodization in Renaissance studies, the boundaries between past and present and between the sacred and the profane have taken on a newly charged intensity.

Reconstruction 11.4 and upcoming issues

updated: 
Thursday, December 29, 2011 - 6:08pm
Reconstruction: Studies in Contemporary Culture

Introducing: Reconstruction 11.4

Editor's Introduction:

"Something to occupy the time": Activism and Anagnorisis, by Marc Ouellette

Articles

Talking to Yourself: Garfield Minus Garfield as an Introduction to Techno-Companionship , by Andy Engel

Cabelian Way, by Mike DuBose and Cristian Pralea

American Circus Re-Invented: Queering Cirque Du Soleil, by Michael Johnson Jr.

Wincest is the Best, or, Raep is What Happens When You Say No: Subversive Humor and Serious Business in Capslock Supernatural, by Britt Eira Long

Poetics: Performance and Genre Bending

Absence and Sociality in Live Film Narration: Poets of the Unreeled in Miami , by Alan Clinton

Retrofitting English Studies: When Diversity Becomes an Afterthought

updated: 
Thursday, December 29, 2011 - 4:39pm
Texas A&M English Graduate Student Association

Texas A&M University's English Graduate Student Association Graduate Conference:

"Retrofitting English Studies: When Diversity Becomes an Afterthought"
April 7-8, 2012

Speaker: Jay Dolmage

Aftermaths: Revolution and Recovery (May 10-12, 2012)

updated: 
Thursday, December 29, 2011 - 10:31am
Theory Conference/ The University of Western Ontario

On 17 December 2010, Tunisian fruit vendor Mohamed Bouazizi performed an act of self-immolation in protest of widespread state corruption. Galvanized by Bouazizi's gesture of dissent, Tunisians protested en masse, successfully demanding the removal of the oppressive regime in power. The Tunisian experience inspired what would come to be known as the Arab Spring, threatening the overthrow of totalitarian regimes across the Middle East, most notably in Egypt, Libya, Syria, and Yemen.

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