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Forms of Life: Literature, Politics, Aesthetics

updated: 
Wednesday, October 5, 2011 - 1:41pm
The Department of Comparative Literature Binghamton University

Forms of Life: Literature, Politics, Aesthetics
The Department of Comparative Literature
Binghamton University
March 2nd-3rd 2012

Valley Humanities Review-- Call for Undergraduate Papers in the Humanities

updated: 
Wednesday, October 5, 2011 - 12:19pm
Valley Humanities Review

The Valley Humanities Review is currently seeking essays in the humanities for publication in its Spring 2012 Issue. We seek essays of high quality, intellectual rigor and originality that challenge or contribute substantially to ongoing conversations in the humanities. Topics may include but are not limited to: literature, history, religion, philosophy, art, art history and foreign languages. VHR is also currently seeking poetry submissions; students may submit up to three poems. VHR is committed to undergraduate research and scholarship in the field; therefore, we only accept submissions by current or recently graduated undergraduate students. Our reading period runs from September 1 to December 15 of each year.

Digital (De-)(Re-)Territorializations

updated: 
Wednesday, October 5, 2011 - 11:50am
Bowling Green State University and BGSU's Association for Textual and Literary Analysis Students

Digital (De-)(Re-)Territorializations
Hosted by Bowling Green State University
In association with BGSU's Association for Textual and Literary Analysis Students

Current Keynote Speakers:
Dr. Radhika Gajjala
Dr. Kris Blair

Call for Papers: Race, Ethnicity, and Appalachia. (Deadline: January 15, 2012.

updated: 
Wednesday, October 5, 2011 - 10:40am
The Kirwan Institute: Race/Ethnicity Multidisciplinary Global Contexts

We invite proposals from scholars, activists/practitioners, and creative non-fiction/fiction writers who consider a host of issues evoked by "Appalachia."

Though referring to a specific geographic space, the word "Appalachia" often conjures a set of stereotypes stemming from the notion that Appalachia is an isolated and homogenous region when in fact international migrations and markets have been true presences for more than 100 years.

"Travelling Genres: English in India, India in English", January 11-13th, 2012

updated: 
Wednesday, October 5, 2011 - 7:00am
UGC Special Assistance Programme (DRS Phase II) Centre for English Studies School of Language, Literature and Culture Studies Jawaharlal Nehru University New Delhi – 110067, India

CALL FOR PAPERS:
National Young Researchers' Seminar
on
"Travelling Genres: English in India, India in English"
UGC Special Assistance Programme (DRS Phase II)
Centre for English Studies
School of Language, Literature and Culture Studies
Jawaharlal Nehru University
New Delhi – 110067, India
January 11-13th, 2012
sap.ces@gmail.com

Digital (De-)(Re-)Territorializations

updated: 
Tuesday, October 4, 2011 - 3:46pm
Bowling Green State University and BGSU's Association for Textual and Literary Analysis Students

Digital (De-)(Re-)Territorializations
Hosted by Bowling Green State University
In association with BGSU's Association for Textual and Literary Analysis Students

Current Keynote Speakers:
Dr. Radhika Gajjala
Dr. Kris Blair

Adorno and the Crisis of the Contemporary. 2012 ACLA, 3/29-4/1, Brown University

updated: 
Tuesday, October 4, 2011 - 12:18pm
Weihsin Gui

This seminar explores the salience of Theodor Adorno's work for engaging with the emerging language of collapse, catastrophe, and crisis in literary studies and the humanities as a contemporary problem. Compared to other scholars whose work on empire, states of exception, and neoliberal governmentality seem more timely, Adorno is not often invoked in recent discussions of crisis.

Violence and Represention

updated: 
Tuesday, October 4, 2011 - 12:48am
ACLA 2012 Convention

Epistemic shifts are themselves inherently violent and the uncertainty and instability that these shifts produce frequently elicit a violent response. This seminar intends to put into conversation scholarly works that explore both the representation of violent acts and the violence of representation. We are interested in a diverse conversation across multiple disciplines and seek papers that deal with literary, cinematic, performative or documentary texts.

Auteurs in the 21st Century (April 6-7, 2012)

updated: 
Monday, October 3, 2011 - 9:26pm
Yale Film Studies Graduate Conference

Is the concept of auteurism still valid for exploring filmmaking in the 21st century? After its introduction by Cahiers du Cinéma in the 1950s, auteur theory became both the predominant conceptual framework for scholarly analysis of innovative filmmakers' work and the heuristic for film appreciation in the popular imagination. Although auteurism has come under sustained attack in recent decades, its allure has persisted – overwhelmingly, we still view films as being the work of a singular creative consciousness.

Humans Gone Wild: Catastrophe, Inhumanity, Animality [Nov 15 Abstract Deadline]

updated: 
Monday, October 3, 2011 - 8:59pm
American Comparative Literature Association Seminar [March 29-Apr 1]

Insofar as catastrophes give rise to, or are produced by, inhumanity, how is that inhumanity represented in terms of animals and animality? What does it mean to be inhuman and in what sense is it commensurate with "being an animal"? This seminar seeks to explore the association of animality with perpetrators of atrocity, immoral or depraved behavior, aggression and violence, as well as with victims of such violence—with both inhuman acts and inhumane conditions. How, and with what consequence, is such language used to represent "wild" or uncivilized acts, beyond the reach of moral reason or human understanding? What does such language (mis)recognize about the instincts of humans or other species?

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