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NeMLA 2012: Novel as Threat, Novel as Therapy in French Literature (abstracts due 9/30/11)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 7, 2011 - 8:22pm
Jessica Tanner / Harvard University

This panel seeks to explore the use of medical metaphors (contagion, pathogen, medication, cure) to advocate or warn against the practice of reading novels in French/Francophone literature from the 17th century onward. What are the stakes of such strategies for readers, male and female? How does this discourse inflect our conception of the communication and transmission of ideas and sentiment? How might we understand the relation of pathos, pathology, and pathogen? Please send 300-word abstracts by September 30, 2011 to Jessica Tanner, jtanner@fas.harvard.edu.

[UPDATE] NEMLA: March 15-18, 2012, Rochester, NY: Call for papers - Obscenity, Violence, and Humor in the Eighteenth-Century Nov

updated: 
Wednesday, September 7, 2011 - 3:50pm
Kathleen Alves/City University of New York

**Abstracts sent to the tamayok@stjohns.edu has been lost. Please resend immediately to the alternative emails above**

This panel will examine eighteenth-century British fiction and the relationship between violence, obscenity and humor. Novelists' use of the obscene joke is a tempered way to suppress the blurring lines of distinction between classes and to maintain hierarchy, a direct response to the changes in society and to the increasing sensitivity to vulgar subjects in polite society. This panel is interested in discovering how authors mobilize social anxiety through violence, obscenity and humor.

Call for Papers for LGBTQ Focus Group (Deadline: October 15/November 1, 2011)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 7, 2011 - 12:28pm
Association for Theatre in Higher Education (Conference 2012)

CALL FOR PAPERS
LGBTQ Focus Group
Association for Theatre in Higher Education (ATHE) Conference
August 2-5, 2012, Hyatt Regency (Capitol Hill), Washington, DC

Submission Deadlines:
Individual Papers or Presentations: October 15 (send to conference planner Nick Salvato, ngs9@cornell.edu)
Complete Sessions: November 1 (submit online directly to ATHE at www.athe.org)

Capturing Witches: Histories, Stories, Images. 400 years after the Lancashire Witches

updated: 
Wednesday, September 7, 2011 - 10:29am
Lancaster University, UK

In 2012, a year-long programme of events in Lancaster and the surrounding area will mark the 400th anniversary of the trial and execution of the first group of Lancashire Witches. A second trial occurred in 1634 and although pardoned, the accused were re-imprisoned in Lancaster Castle. The case of the Lancashire Witches and their supposed crimes interwove fact and fiction, local hostilities and more exotic ideas of witches' sabbats that were usually associated with continental witchcraft. They became a cause célèbre, like the witches of Trier and Fulda (Germany), Torsåker (Sweden) and Salem (North America).

9th Global Conference: War and Peace (May 2012: Prague, Czech Republic)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 7, 2011 - 2:49am
Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Net

9th Global Conference
War and Peace

Saturday 19th May – Monday 21st May 2012
Prague, Czech Republic

Call for Papers:
The opening decade of the 21st century has seen war assume a number of new forms – new at least in relation to the 20th century. So, for instance, the West's war in Afghanistan is already longer than WW2, and shows no sign of coming to an end; the nature of those engaged in war has widened to include a variety of non-state agents; and war itself has come to include as arguably justifiable tactics and strategies previously either excluded or at least not recognised as legitimate. In short, the distinction between war and peace is becoming increasingly unclear.

CFP: Popular Culture & The Classroom SW TX PCA/ACA (12/1/11; 2/8-11/12)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 7, 2011 - 1:26am
Southwest/Texas Popular Culture & American Culture Associations

CFP: Popular Culture and the Classroom
Papers (panelists) needed to examine role of popular culture in today's classrooms (which
includes secondary classrooms or college classrooms) at the Southwest and Texas Popular
Culture Association/American Culture Association Annual Conference, Feb. 8-11, 2012 in
Albuquerque, NM (Hyatt Regency Hotel, Albuquerque).

Here's a quick test for today's educators:

Cognitive Approaches to Literature - March 15-18, 2012

updated: 
Tuesday, September 6, 2011 - 9:36pm
Barry Spence / Comparative Literature / University of Massachusetts Amherst

Recent decades have seen an acceleration of innovative interdisciplinary research bridging the fields of cognitive science, literary theory, and narratology. This panel invites papers that undertake a cognitive reading of literary texts. What is the relationship between narrative and cognition? What can we observe about the structure of stories when looked at from the perspective of the theory of mind? Please send a 200-300 word abstract to Barry Spence, University of Massachusetts Amherst, (bspence@complit.umass.edu). Paper proposals are due: 30 Sept. 2011

[UPDATE: EXTENDED DEADLINE] "Animal Narratives in Old English Poetry" -- International Medieval Congress, Kalamazoo 2012

updated: 
Tuesday, September 6, 2011 - 7:29pm
Erik Wade / Oregon Medieval English Literature Society (OMELS)

Animals frequently appear as symbols or allegories in medieval literature. This panel, however, seeks to recover the original animality that is lost when we dismiss the animals as transparent allegories. We might know what the animals mean for the narrative, but why does the story use animals—and why these particular animals—in order to convey such meanings? Papers can potentially combine animal studies, close-reading, and historicism to examine the portrayals of animals as animals in medieval literature. Papers could consider such wide-ranging topics as:

The micro-narratives of animals in the midst of larger medieval tales (such as the weasels in the Volsungsaga or beasts of battle in heroic poetry).

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