Subscribe to RSS - theory

theory

[UPDATE] The Velvet Light Trap #70 - Stocks, Screens, and Servers: The Materiality of Media DEADLINE EXTENDED

updated: 
Thursday, September 8, 2011 - 4:11pm
The Velvet Light Trap, University of Wisconsin-Madison

As culture becomes increasingly digitized—from downloading and streaming videos and music to digital film production and cloud computing—arguments for the "dematerialization" of media are becoming commonplace. However, media have always been, and remain, embedded in and structured by material objects, networks, and practices that constrain their uses and meanings. Any cultural artifact bears traces and consequences of the material conditions of its production, distribution, and reception, whether this be a result of the size and weight of the camera that shot a film's images, the geography of the shipping or cable network through which it was transported or transmitted, or the spaces occupied by physical record or DVD collections.

[REMINDER] The Apocalypse in Literature and Film - October 1, 2011

updated: 
Thursday, September 8, 2011 - 2:15pm
_LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory_

Alien invasion, viral outbreak, nuclear holocaust, the rise of the machines, the flood, the second coming, the second ice age—these are just a few of the ways human beings have imagined their "end of days." And someone's Armageddon clock is always ticking—we just dodged Harold Camping's rapture on May 21st of this year, and the Mayan-predicted doomsday of 2012 is just around the corner. In the end, what do we reveal about ourselves when we dream of the apocalypse? What are the social and political functions of these narratives in any given historical period? How do different cultures imagine the apocalypse, and what do these differences reveal? What is particular to the narratological design and content of apocalyptic texts?

American Association of Australasian Literary Studies Annual Conference - Toronto - Feb. 17-19, 2012

updated: 
Thursday, September 8, 2011 - 2:01pm
American Association of Australasian Literary Studies (AAALS)

The AAALS calls for papers for its 28th Annual conference to be held in conjunction with ANSZANA in Toronto, ON from February 17 to 19, 2012. As always, the conference will be collegial and open-minded, welcoming papers from many different approaches and contexts. Connections involving any combination of Canada, New Zealand, Australia, and the US will be welcomed. We also are especially interested in papers on Indigenous Australian literature and Maori literature. Welcome as well will be papers dealing with Patrick White, whose centennial is in 2012 and who is in the midst of an exciting reconsideration.

Encountering Buddhism in Twentieth-Century British and American Literature

updated: 
Thursday, September 8, 2011 - 8:10am
Middlesex University

We are commissioning a book chapter on Robert Pirsig and Buddhism for an edited collection of essays to be published by Continuum in 2012.

This will be an exciting and innovative volume examining the reception of Buddhism in British and American literature. Timely and valuable, it will offer an authoritative introduction to how a variety of authors from T.S. Eliot through to Christopher Isherwood and Iris Murdoch engaged with Buddhist thought.

We are looking for a lively well-written piece which demonstrates a knowledgeable and scholarly understanding of both Buddhist thought and Robert Pirsig.

Please send proposals of interest and a 500 word abstract by October 1st 2011 to:

NeMLA 2012: Novel as Threat, Novel as Therapy in French Literature (abstracts due 9/30/11)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 7, 2011 - 8:22pm
Jessica Tanner / Harvard University

This panel seeks to explore the use of medical metaphors (contagion, pathogen, medication, cure) to advocate or warn against the practice of reading novels in French/Francophone literature from the 17th century onward. What are the stakes of such strategies for readers, male and female? How does this discourse inflect our conception of the communication and transmission of ideas and sentiment? How might we understand the relation of pathos, pathology, and pathogen? Please send 300-word abstracts by September 30, 2011 to Jessica Tanner, jtanner@fas.harvard.edu.

[UPDATE] NEMLA: March 15-18, 2012, Rochester, NY: Call for papers - Obscenity, Violence, and Humor in the Eighteenth-Century Nov

updated: 
Wednesday, September 7, 2011 - 3:50pm
Kathleen Alves/City University of New York

**Abstracts sent to the tamayok@stjohns.edu has been lost. Please resend immediately to the alternative emails above**

This panel will examine eighteenth-century British fiction and the relationship between violence, obscenity and humor. Novelists' use of the obscene joke is a tempered way to suppress the blurring lines of distinction between classes and to maintain hierarchy, a direct response to the changes in society and to the increasing sensitivity to vulgar subjects in polite society. This panel is interested in discovering how authors mobilize social anxiety through violence, obscenity and humor.

Call for Papers for LGBTQ Focus Group (Deadline: October 15/November 1, 2011)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 7, 2011 - 12:28pm
Association for Theatre in Higher Education (Conference 2012)

CALL FOR PAPERS
LGBTQ Focus Group
Association for Theatre in Higher Education (ATHE) Conference
August 2-5, 2012, Hyatt Regency (Capitol Hill), Washington, DC

Submission Deadlines:
Individual Papers or Presentations: October 15 (send to conference planner Nick Salvato, ngs9@cornell.edu)
Complete Sessions: November 1 (submit online directly to ATHE at www.athe.org)

Pages