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What Happens Now: 21st Century Writing in English', 2nd International Conference, 16-18 July 2012, University of Lincoln, UK

Monday, August 8, 2011 - 12:01pm
Dr Sian Adiseshiah/University of Lincoln, UK

Following the success of the 2010 conference 'What Happens Now: 21st Century Writing in English – the first decade' there will be a theme for the second conference, which will form the focus of a special issue of the new journal devoted to 21st century literature, C21 Literatures: A Journal of 21st-century Writings. The theme is the title of Paul Gauguin's painting, 'Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going?'

[REMINDER] CFP 'States of Emergence, States of Emergency'

Monday, August 8, 2011 - 9:32am
Excursions Journal

Excursions Journal
Call For Papers
'States of Emergence, States of Emergency'
Deadline for articles: 15th August 2011
Submit online at:
'The tradition of the oppressed teaches us that the 'state of emergency' in which we live is not
the exception but the rule. We must attain to a conception of history which is in keeping with this
insight. Then we shall clearly realize that it is our task to bring about a real state of emergency,
and this will improve our position in the struggle against fascism.'

Toleration and its Discontents, ASECS San Antonio (March 22-25, 2012)

Sunday, August 7, 2011 - 12:39pm
Patrick Mello/ ASECS 2012

This panel seeks papers that complicate and deepen our understanding of the role of religious difference in the development of eighteenth-century literature, culture, and society. Toleration is an inherently ironic and unsatisfying concept that gives the appearance of inclusiveness, but entails nothing of acceptance or equality. Such an understanding of tolerance informs Stanley Fish's claim that "any regime of tolerance will be founded by an intolerant gesture of exclusion" and "those who institute such a regime will do everything they can to avoid confronting the violence that inaugurates it." In other words, toleration is typically a pragmatic doctrine that favors political expedience over freedom of conscience.

CFP: Drawing the Line(s): Censorship and Cultural Practices [Oct 31, 2011; March 1-3, 2012]

Saturday, August 6, 2011 - 4:40am
Nhora Serrano, California State University, Long Beach

47th Annual Comparative Literature Conference
California State University, Long Beach
March 1st-3rd, 2012
Drawing the Line(s): Censorship and Cultural Practices

Plenary Speaker: Ilan Stavans
Lewis-Sebring Professor in Latin American and Latino Culture, Amherst College

Special B-Word Public Lecture: An Evening with Azar Nafisi

"Freedom of speech means that you shall not do something to people either for the views they have, or the views they express, or the words they speak or write." ~ Hugo L. Black, U.S. Supreme Court Justice 1963

"There is more than one way to burn a book. And the world is full of people running about with lit matches" ~ Ray Bradubury, Fahrenheit 451

[UPDATE] Revenge of the Queers: Ethics and the Politics of Resentment (NEMLA 2012)

Friday, August 5, 2011 - 3:41pm
Emily King / NEMLA 2012

From Diane DiMassa's caffeinated homicidal heroine in Hothead Paisan to Lee Edelman's sinthomosexual who "chooses not to choose the Child," revenge – if only phantasmatic – invigorates queer narratives, theory, even politics. And given that oppression breeds resentment, it is no intellectual leap to consider why revenge becomes a popular trope. But is there something inherently queer about revenge? Could we envision distinctly queer forms of revenge? Or is such an essentialist application of "queer" its very antithesis?

Liminality in Contemporary Literature (Intl. Conference on Narrative, March 15-17, 2012)

Friday, August 5, 2011 - 2:21pm
Ashley Kunsa, Duquesne University

From post-colonial theory to sociology to anthropology, the concept of liminality has offered a means for understanding instances of cultural, social, and political "in-between-ness." I am looking to organize a panel that examines the nature, use, and/or function of the liminal in contemporary literature for the 2012 International Conference on Narrative, to be held March 15–17 in Las Vegas, NV (

Sketched by themselves. Society tested by "panoramic" literature

Friday, August 5, 2011 - 9:31am
Interférences littéraires - Literaire Interferenties (Open Access Journal)

Sketched by themselves
Society tested by "panoramic" literature

Special issue of the open acces journal 'Interferences littéraires - Literaire interferenties' (number 8, May 2012)
edited by Nathalie Preiss (Université de Reims) & Valérie Stiénon (F.N.R.S - Université de Liège )

[UPDATE] The Apocalypse in Literature and Film - October 1, 2011

Friday, August 5, 2011 - 9:21am
_LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory_

Alien invasion, viral outbreak, nuclear holocaust, the rise of the machines, the flood, the second coming, the second ice age—these are just a few of the ways human beings have imagined their "end of days." And someone's Armageddon clock is always ticking—we just dodged Harold Camping's rapture on May 21st of this year, and the Mayan-predicted doomsday of 2012 is just around the corner. In the end, what do we reveal about ourselves when we dream of the apocalypse? What are the social and political functions of these narratives in any given historical period? How do different cultures imagine the apocalypse, and what do these differences reveal? What is particular to the narratological design and content of apocalyptic texts?