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Prayer and Performance: acts of belief as symbolic communication (1450-1650), April 23-24 2012, Aarhus, Denmark

updated: 
Sunday, May 29, 2011 - 3:42pm
Aarhus University, Denmark

This project seeks to explore aspects of prayer as a performative act in European culture during the late medieval and early modern period, considering these findings in light of the most current theoretical and anthropological perspectives. An intentionally interdisciplinary effort, it will draw together studies of literature, material culture and religious anthropology. The project intends to answer the following questions:

Fictionality Across the Arts and Media, Free University Berlin, 13-15 October

updated: 
Saturday, May 28, 2011 - 2:36am
Friedrich Schlegel School of Literary Studies Free University Berlin

The Annual Conference of the Friedrich Schlegel Graduate School of Literary Studies (Freie Universität Berlin) takes place on October 13--15, 2011. The programme committee invites scholars to submit proposals for papers on the topic of fictionality across the arts and media.

Comparative Literature Essays--Deadline JUNE 15

updated: 
Saturday, May 28, 2011 - 1:05am
UC Berkeley Comparative Literature Undergraduate Journal

To submit: http://ucb-cluj.org/submissions/

Call for Submissions!

The UC Berkeley Undergraduate Journal is currently accepting submissions for its inaugural Fall 2011 issue! We are looking for critical articles with subject matter that falls under the wide banner of Comparative Literature, from international literary trends to literary comparisons between two specific cultures to theoretical literary discourse. The (rolling) deadline to submit is June 15, 2011. Any undergraduate is encouraged to apply. Additional information for non-US students is at the bottom of the page.

Submission guidelines:

Revenge of the Queers: Ethics and the Politics of Resentment (Abstracts due 9/30; NEMLA 2012)

updated: 
Friday, May 27, 2011 - 2:22pm
Emily King / NEMLA

From Diane DiMassa's caffeinated homicidal heroine in Hothead Paisan to Lee Edelman's sinthomosexual who "chooses not to choose the Child," revenge – if only phantasmatic – invigorates queer narratives, theory, even politics. And given that oppression breeds resentment, it is no intellectual leap to consider why revenge becomes a popular trope. But is there something inherently queer about revenge? Could we envision distinctly queer forms of revenge? Or is such an essentialist application of "queer" its very antithesis?

2nd International Conference on Human & Social Sciences

updated: 
Friday, May 27, 2011 - 12:34pm
Sapienza University of Rome / MCSER-Mediterranean Center of Social and Educational Research

The conference will address interdisciplinary practices across the social and human sciences. Are encouraged to register and attend this Conference all academics, researchers or scholars.

Klick here to go on the website of the conference:

http://www.mcser.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=5&Item...

CFP: Walking Around in the Space of Consumption and Segregation: Examining Place in Language and Literature / Deadline: Oct 15

updated: 
Thursday, May 26, 2011 - 8:41pm
Plaza: Dialogues in Language and Literature / University of Houston Graduate Literary Journal

We are currently seeking student-written articles and creative works that examine the role of place in literature, composition studies, folklore, cultural studies, language studies, and gender studies.]

Linda Flower complicates the idea of "place" as only a silent object of discourse in her introduction to City Comp, saying that "writing is not merely situated in and shaped by its time and place, but … the writer's sense of that time and place is the source of meanings, motivations, and identities." Whether discussing the city or country, we recognize the importance of place, both the physical space and the encoded values associated with it, in reflecting and creating identity and ideas.

NEMLA: March 15-18, 2012, Rochester, NY: Call for papers - Obscenity, Violence, and Humor in the Eighteenth-Century Novel

updated: 
Thursday, May 26, 2011 - 1:43pm
Kathleen Alves/City University of New York

This panel will examine eighteenth-century British fiction and the relationship between violence, obscenity and humor. Novelists' use of the obscene joke is a tempered way to suppress the blurring lines of distinction between classes and to maintain hierarchy, a direct response to the changes in society and to the increasing sensitivity to vulgar subjects in polite society. This panel is interested in discovering how authors mobilize social anxiety through violence, obscenity and humor.

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