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CFP: "Dread, Ghost, Specter, and Possession"

updated: 
Friday, July 15, 2011 - 3:56am
manycinemas


For our third issue (Spring 2012) we look for articles on the topics: DREAD, GHOST, SPECTER and POSSESSION in Asian, African and Latin American Cinema. (Deadline for proposals 15/08/11).

Dread, Ghost, Specter, and Possession
in Asian, African and Latin American Cinema

UC Berkeley graduate student conference in east Asian studies - call for papers

updated: 
Thursday, July 14, 2011 - 1:39pm
Haas Junior Scholars Program for Doctoral Candidates


"Parameters of Identity: practice, place, and tradition in East Asia" -- a graduate student conference at the University of California at Berkeley, January 20-21, 2012

Graduate students in all fields of East Asian studies are hereby invited to submit proposals for a conference entitled "Parameters of Identity: practice, place, and tradition in East Asia," which will be held at the University of California at Berkeley, January 20-21, 2012.

11th to 13th November 2011 IRELAND AND SCOTLAND - BARRIERS AND BORDERLANDS at Sunderland, UK

updated: 
Thursday, July 14, 2011 - 9:24am
North East Irish Culture Network, with the Scottish Irish Network (SIN) and the Leverhulme Trust

Following the success of the previous eight international Irish Studies conferences, the University of Sunderland, in association with NEICN, invites papers for an interdisciplinary conference, which will run from 11th to 13th November 2011.

[UPDATE] The Apocalypse in Literature and Film - October 1, 2011

updated: 
Thursday, July 14, 2011 - 6:03am
_LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory_

Alien invasion, viral outbreak, nuclear holocaust, the rise of the machines, the flood, the second coming, the second ice age—these are just a few of the ways human beings have imagined their "end of days." And someone's Armageddon clock is always ticking—we just dodged Harold Camping's rapture on May 21st of this year, and the Mayan-predicted doomsday of 2012 is just around the corner. In the end, what do we reveal about ourselves when we dream of the apocalypse? What are the social and political functions of these narratives in any given historical period? How do different cultures imagine the apocalypse, and what do these differences reveal? What is particular to the narratological design and content of apocalyptic texts?

[UPDATE] The Art of Outrage: Poetics, Politics, Polarization. In NYC @Fordham University's Lincoln Center Campus

updated: 
Wednesday, July 13, 2011 - 5:13pm
NOTE: Keynote Speaker is Prof. Russ Castronovo (Deadline July 31st, 2011. Conference on Oct 14th, 2011)

An interdisciplinary graduate conference.
Keynote Speaker: Prof. Russ Castronovo, Jean Wall Bennet Professor of English and American Studies at University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Prof. Castronovo's publications include:
Beautiful Democracy: Aesthetics and Anarchy in a Global Era (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007);

Necro Citizenship: Death, Eroticism, and the Public Sphere in the Nineteenth-Century United States (Durham: Duke University Press, 2001);

Fathering the Nation: American Genealogies of Slavery and Freedom (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995)

Materializing Democracy: Toward a Revitalized Cultural Politics, co-edited with Dana Nelson (Durham: Duke University Press, 2002)

New College Conference, March 8-10, 2012, Sarasota, FL: Call for papers: "Does Beowulf Allow (for) Illustration?" (due 9/5/2011)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 13, 2011 - 2:43pm
Matthew J. Snyder / University of Florida

This session will seek to explore the question: Can Beowulf be illustrated, or does the poem exhibit and/or foster an inherent antagonism between sign and icon? Recent efforts to provide illustration that augments (or perhaps subsumes or subordinates) the poem's 3182 lines of text, including Seamus Heaney and John D. Niles' Beowulf: An Illustrated Edition (Norton, 2007), the graphic novel Beowulf: Monster Slayer (Graphic Universe, 2008), and Robert Zemeckis' 2007 motion-capture animated film, all would seem to push back against what might be termed the text's opacity of the visual imaginary.

Picturing the Nineteenth Century - March 22-25, 2012 - University of Kentucky

updated: 
Wednesday, July 13, 2011 - 9:53am
Interdisciplinary Nineteenth Century Studies Association

Though its title foregrounds art and visual culture, this conference will treat "picturing" in all its many senses: imagining, representing, framing, mapping. We invite papers and panels that consider how the nineteenth century represented itself to itself – through depictions of subjectivity, history, and culture; through emerging technologies and disciplines; through self-conscious "meta" attempts to understand methods of representation. We also encourage papers that consider how our own technologies and disciplines create multiple pictures of "the nineteenth century." Interdisciplinary papers and panels are especially welcome.

"The Decorated Page" of Medieval Images and Graphic Novels (9/15/11; Medieval Congress, May 2012)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 13, 2011 - 9:26am
International Medieval Congress in Kalamazoo, Michigan

"The Decorated Page" of Medieval Images and Graphic Novels: "Sequential Theory" in dialogue with medieval art
International Medieval Congress in Kalamazoo, Michigan
10-13 May 2012

We can follow the history of the "Decorated Page" from illuminated medieval manuscripts to the graphic novel, but what if we skip the pesky intervening years from one to the other? That is, what can the theories and analysis of medieval manuscripts, wall paintings or other medieval visual mediums tell us about how we read the graphic novel, and how might the theories behind contemporary graphic novel analysis help us read medieval illustrations and art?

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