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travel writing

International Conference on London Studies "Versions of Londonness". Please note: Selected papers will be published in the post-conference e-Book.

updated: 
Friday, August 24, 2018 - 12:19pm
London Centre for Interdisciplenary Research
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

International Conference on London Studies"Versions of Londonness"24 November, 2018 – London, UKorganised by London Centre for Interdisciplinary Research

Selected papers will be published in the post-conference e-Book.

Alternate Words: Language and Identity in German Transnational Literature and Cinema

updated: 
Tuesday, August 21, 2018 - 10:19am
Amanda Sheffer / The Catholic University of America
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

CFP: Alternate Words: Language and Identity in German Transnational Literature and Cinema (Sep 30 2018; March 21-24 2019) - Session 17365  

 

50th Anniversary Convention: Northeastern Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

March 21-24, 2019

Washington, DC

Host Institution: Georgetown University

 

Trans-nationalizing Identity and Space in The Orient: 19th Century Women’s Travel Writing Nemla 2019

updated: 
Friday, August 17, 2018 - 9:26am
Dr. Nilgun A. Okur / NeMLA 2019, Washington D.C. March 21-24, 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

The clash of people and civilizations from East to West has been a particularly rich, varied, and intense development in history. Formulating new identities, while being surrounded by foreign space and native people, the traveler reflects the changing modes, times, and equally shifting cultural attitudes that can be found in a European’s travel writing. For instance, a glimpse across time into the city of Istanbul, held as a popular travel spot by visitors for centuries, reveals varied cultures, groups of people and their diverse linguistic uses, food choices, social norms and religious customs.

Transnational Exchange and the Early Modern World (NeMLA 2019)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:46pm
Victor Sierra Matute
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

How material exchange and mobility affect people and their ideas? How do these subjects and these objects transform the place of destination and its practices, knowledge, texts, and understanding of the world? This panel will address the consequences of the mobility of subjects and the exchange of objects in the early modern world. Early modernity is a time strongly characterized by the increasing crossing of boundaries. In this sense, this panel wants to analyze how material exchange enables different cultures to cross borders and permeate different social spaces, modifying those who import them and those who export them.

Moving through Memory and Space

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:31pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

This panel seeks to explore representations of transnational space and transcultural memory in literature of French expression. Whether through exile, immigration, travel, migritudeerrance, or the meanderings of the flâneur/flâneuse, francophones have traversed a wide global terrain. Just as authors integrate place into their creations, they in turn leave their stamp on the memories and associations that accrue to any geographical location. Cultural production then reflects and inflects shifting identitarian configurations.

Urban Space and Cityscapes: Italian perspectives in fiction, photography, and film.

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 2:56pm
Letizia Modena, Vanderbilt University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Dear Colleagues,

Please consider submitting a proposal to the following session for the NeMLA 2019 Convention in Washington, DC (March 21-24).

 Urban Space and Cityscapes: Italian perspectives in fiction, photography, and film.

Sex, Gender, and Race in the Atlantic and Mediterranean Worlds: A Comparative View

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 2:48pm
Patricia Ferrer-Medina and Janine Peterson, Marist College
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, August 15, 2018

This seminar explores how Europeans constructed the identities of non-European and non-Christian peoples in the Atlantic and Mediterranean worlds. We invite papers that examine how Europeans racialized, sexualized, or in any way “othered” either Jews or Muslims in Southern Europe, the indigenous peoples of the Americas, or the peoples of North/West Africa that they encountered in Africa in addition to those encountered as slaves when traveling to the Caribbean and Central America. Renaissance and early modern European views of different peoples was closely connected to, and constructed by, prevailing ideas about gender and sexuality as well as notions of civilization and nature.

USA expatriation project

updated: 
Monday, July 23, 2018 - 9:51am
Marshall Moore
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 1, 2018

I am in the process of compiling an anthology of writing from expatriate Americans. There has already been some interest from a university press, and a number of contributors are already attached to the project. Depending on the type and number of submissions I receive, I may do this as two books: one volume as academic research and the other as creative nonfiction/ memoir.

Here’s a bit of background on the book:

Travel in English Literature (RSA Toronto, March 17-19, 2019)

updated: 
Monday, July 23, 2018 - 9:39am
Renaissance Society of America
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, August 5, 2018

This is a guaranteed session that considers representations of travel in English Renaissance literature. Given the regular movement of persons and merchandise between England and Continental Europe and the incipient development of English interests in the New World, travel is central to the evolution of an English national identity. At the same time, an idea of travel profoundly subtends humanist models of education, which generally present their material as objects of translatio across time and place. This panel aims to explore how early modern writers conceptualize travel, and how they respond to travel’s capacity to register both physical and imaginative experiences.

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