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Landscapes of Politics and Identity in American Literature

updated: 
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 10:13am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This panel investigates the concept of landscape in American literature.  For Americans, the landscape brings strong associations, whether cultural, political, historical, or commercial.  The landscape, in a sense, is central to the American identity. This session seeks proposals on the meaning of landscape in American literature.  How do Americans use landscape to create identity?  In what ways are landscapes used politically or culturally to create meaning?  This session encourages interdisciplinary approaches to the landscape in American literature, including the examination of literature and the visual arts. 

NEMLA 2020

Marriott Copely Place

Boston, MA

March 5-8, 2020

Jenny Diski: A Celebration

updated: 
Saturday, May 25, 2019 - 6:25am
Ben Grant / University of Oxford
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 1, 2019

Call for Papers

 

Jenny Diski: A Celebration

 

A Symposium, University of Oxford, 7th April 2020

 

Keynote Speaker: Blake Morrison

 

Jenny Diski sadly died in 2016, and the time is right for a celebration of her work.

 

Departures and Arrivals: Women, Mobility and Travel Writing

updated: 
Wednesday, May 22, 2019 - 11:34am
Revista Feminismo/s
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 1, 2019

Feminismo/s, from the Institute of Research in Gender Studies from the University of Alicante, is currently accepting submissions for its 36 issue, entitled “Departures and Arrivals: Women, Mobility and Travel Writing”. This issue seeks to approach women travel writing from a transhistorical and transnational perspective. Thus, we encourage submissions that deal with travelling and mobility in women’s writing from different cultural and national backgrounds and periods.

We are particularly interested in contributions that explore the intersections between gender, mobility and identity, including, but not restricted to the following aspects:

 

PAMLA 2019- Travel and Literature session: 20th and 21st century travel writing

updated: 
Thursday, May 23, 2019 - 1:18pm
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 10, 2019

The travel and literature session welcomes proposals focused on travel, odyssey and mobility through a literary lens, with a special interest in 20th- 21st century travel writing.

We are particularly interested in papers that take into consideration travel writing by authors better known for other forms of writing (novelists, poets, philosophers, essayists) and for whom travel, and travel writing, serve as a means to veer from their habitual modes of writing and allow them to experiment with another form (Baudrillard’s Cool memories, Barthes’ Empire of signs, Leiris’ Phantom Africa are examples of travel narratives of interest).

Topics may include:

Ekphrastic Mirrors in Transnational Space

updated: 
Tuesday, April 30, 2019 - 4:44pm
PAMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 10, 2019

The proposed session invites papers that explore how the chiasmic reflections of an ekphrasis reveal the interior subjectivity, ideology and the desire of its author. In Ancient rhetorical theory, ekphrasis refers to the use of language to make an audience imagine a scene.

Travel Studies

updated: 
Wednesday, May 1, 2019 - 11:55am
Northeast Popular Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, June 1, 2019

The travel studies area of NEPCA invites paper proposals on the subject of travel, broadly conceived.  Paper proposals may include (but are not limited to) analysis and critical perspectives on such travel-related topics as:

 

CFP Migrant Writings

updated: 
Wednesday, April 24, 2019 - 11:40am
Scritture Migranti. Rivista di scambi interculturali
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 31, 2019

The Editorial Board of “Scritture migranti. Rivista di Scambi Interculturali” is now accepting articles for its 12/2018 issue. Interested scholars should send an abstract of their proposal (about 500  words) to redazione.scritturemigranti@unibo.it Deadline for abstract submission: May 10 2019. Notification of acceptance will be sent no later than May 31 2019.

The deadline for the submission of the final text is: OCTOBER 31 2019.

In Passage: The International Journal of Writing and Mobility seeks contributions for its second issue

updated: 
Wednesday, April 17, 2019 - 2:42pm
University of Boumerdes
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, May 17, 2019

In Passage: The International Journal of Writing and Mobility, the electronic journal of the Department of Foreign Languages & Literatures of the University of Boumerdes, seeks contributions for its second issue, to be released in December 2019. The subjects addressed by In Passage include, but are not limited to:

-  Literary genres and movements- Travel literature and intercultural contact.- Nomadism.- Writing and sexual identity                                                     - Code switching/code mixing- Multilingualism and Multiculturalism- Translation issues- "Digital writing" (SMS language, social networks)- Status of the author in the digital age

 

Double Talk: Dialect, Multilingualism, and Coded Language in American Literature

updated: 
Thursday, April 4, 2019 - 1:27pm
Andy Harper / Midwest Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, April 29, 2019

In Strange Talk (1999), Gavin Jones argues the ambivalence of late-nineteenth-century American texts’ incorporation of accents, dialects, and foreign tongues, suggesting its tendency both to reinforce and to resist white hegemonic control of the English language. Writing around a decade earlier, Henry Louis Gates, Jr. (1988), Houston A. Baker (1987), Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari (1986) theorize the radically subversive and “deterritorializing” politics of African American English. Today, American writers Junot Díaz and Esmé Waijun Wang incorporate untranslated Spanish and Chinese, respectively, into their work. This session invites papers exploring the politics of dialect, multilingualism, and coded language in American literature.

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