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Teaching Post-Modern Native American Literature

updated: 
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 3:34pm
Carrie Louise Sheffield

Call For Papers: 2016 Native American and Literature Symposium

Panel Title: Teaching "Post-Modern" Native American and First Nations Literature

Many current (and not so current) Native American/First Nations texts exhibit the complex structures of post-modern literature, but are they really post-modern? And should we teach them as such?

Call for Chapter Proposals - Nationalism and Popular Culture

updated: 
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 3:01pm
Tim Nieguth

Our world is a world of nations. The existence and fundamental importance of nations, national identities, or national boundaries is rarely questioned. Yet, the scholarly literature on nationalism has shown that national communities are socially constructed, that national identities are fluid, and that national boundaries are constantly contested. Clearly, maintaining nations requires a great deal of collective effort. How is it that this effort is rendered invisible? How have nations come to be seen as natural? Why do individuals buy into the idea of national identity?

ASECS -- The Objects of Performance (3/31/2016 - 4/3/2016)

updated: 
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 2:30pm
Ashley Bender / American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies

This panel seeks papers that consider the role of objects in the production and study of Restoration and eighteenth-century drama. How might a consideration of the physical and material conditions of performance shed light on the texts through which we so often engage with the drama? What do textual artifacts reveal about production practices or even specific performances? Please send 300-word abstracts.

Comment dit-on queer? Queer Theory in French

updated: 
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 1:15pm
Adam J. Dexter / NeMLA

47th Annual Convention of the Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
Hartford, Connecticut, USA
17 March - 20 March 2016

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: Sept. 30, 2015

[UPDATE] SCMS 2016 - Hollywood Dreams and Publicity Machines

updated: 
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 12:54pm
Peter Labuza, University of Southern California

Society for Cinema and Media Studies Annual Conference
Hilton Atlanta, March 30 - April 3, 2016

The irony of the title A Star Is Born is no longer surprising, as new histories have examined the way that publicity before, during, and after the Hollywood Classical Cinema has changed and developed the reception of films, stars, and more. While studying films can tell us much about the way they figure into larger histories, studying the way studios, agencies, and other distributors have presented and sold their work to the public can reveal much about both the economic and social issues of the time.

[CFP SCMS 2016] The Possibility of an Island Film

updated: 
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 12:07pm
Joseph Pomp / Harvard University

The oft-remarked "spatial turn" in cultural studies (initiated in part by the reception of Michel de Certeau, Henri Lefebvre, and David Harvey) converged with a resurgence of interest in films that rest upon a depiction or evocation of a specific geographical entity: the "street film," the "city symphony" or the Bergfilm, to name a few oft-noted categories. Many scholars seem to agree tacitly that we might also speak about an "island film," although the term itself has yet to be properly articulated and circulated. In fact, the very concept of a discreet "islandology" is a brand new one (see Marc Shell, Stanford U.P. 2014).

[UPDATE] Ruth Rendell: Special Issue of Contemporary Women's Writing on Ruth Rendell/Barbara Vine

updated: 
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 8:11am
Falmouth University

Ruth Rendell, who has recently died, was one of the most prolific and important female authors of the C20th/21st centuries, achieving many literary awards and honours, plus a Labour peerage. Her literary output, both as Ruth Rendell and Barbara Vine, transcended generic boundaries and conventional assumptions about character, the police procedural novel, class and gender, amongst many of her other concerns.

The Art of the Book (Book Arts)

updated: 
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 7:30am
Cardiff University

In 2014 Cardiff University received a considerable donation of Artists' Books from Ron King of the Circle Press, one of the most influential practitioners of the Book Arts. In December of this year, the University's Special Collections and Rare Books (SCOLAR) will be hosting a major international conference to celebrate this bequest. Speakers will include Ron King (Circle Press), Sarah Bodman (University of the West of England), and Chris McCabe (Poetry Library).

Childhood/Innocence in Victorian Medievalism. The 51st International Congress on Medieval Studies, May 12-15, 2016

updated: 
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 12:55am
The 51st International Congress on Medieval Studies, May 12-15, 2016

Though Victorian interest in the Middle Ages has been well-documented, the particular motivations for that interest deserve fuller attention. This session seeks paper-proposals that will explore how what has often been called the Victorian "cult of the child" informed and complicated nineteenth-century fascination with the medieval period.

Museum Engagements in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Literature; NeMLA 2016; Hartford, CT; March 17-20, 2016 [UPDATE]

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 5:11pm
NeMLA 2016

The rise of the modern museum was (and remains) a global event that resonates across literary cultures. Germain Bazin termed the nineteenth century the "Museum Age" for the myriad ways the new phenomenon of the public museum redefined the social status of art. This session investigates how this development was received by nineteenth- and twentieth-century Anglophone authors writing during and immediately following the rise of the modern museum.

"Make Good Art Out of It": Reaching Into a Violent Past and Reclaiming Your Story 2015

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 4:19pm
Jennifer K. L. Buchan

Creative Nonfiction: Call for Papers–2015

"Make Good Art Out of It": Reaching Into a Violent Past and Reclaiming Your Story

We are calling on writers, artists, dabblers, and scholars to contribute work to an edited collection. The topic deals singularly with domestic violence, but the aim is to contribute nonfiction work that is not only compelling writing, but also stretches and challenges the nonfiction genre.

CFP: CCLA Congress 2016—Engaging Communities Comparatively 28-30 May, 2016

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 4:09pm
Canadian Comparative Literature Association

CFP: Congress 2016—Engaging Communities Comparatively

Knowledge and understandings of shared values are created based on our respect for difference and diversity and our engagement with the communities we live in. A focus on connections between the individual, the local and the global can provoke new ways of thinking.

Alice Munro and Her Contemporaries: Influences and Parallels (NEMLA, Hartford, CT, March 17-20 2016)

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 2:30pm
Northeast Modern Language Association

Even before she won the Nobel Prize in 2013, Alice Munro was the source of much scholarly interest, in Canada and internationally, in part because of her profound sense of her literary predecessors and peers. Her fiction has been read in many ways, but we still need a sharper sense of her affinities with and differences from her contemporaries. She has been frequently cited by other writers as a key influence, but how does the influence work in particular stories? How does the sense of place differ in Margaret Atwood or Lorrie Moore? To what extent does Munro's engagement with metafiction in the 1970s reflect a wider trend, and how do other writers deal with the ethical issues that arise when they use their own lives as material for fiction?

Cities of the Future - NeMLA Conference 2016 - Hartford, CT

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 1:54pm
Matthew Lambert / Carnegie Mellon University

This panel seeks to explore representations of futuristic cities from all periods in American literature, film, and other cultural mediums. In particular, it seeks papers responding to one or more of the following questions: In what ways have American writers and filmmakers envisioned future urban landscapes? In what ways have these visions changed over the course of American history and why? How have urban theorists, critics, and reformers as well as particular ideologies (Christian, technocratic, socialist, libertarian, environmentalist, etc.) shaped them? In what ways do the past and present (or the erasure of the past and/or present) affect their depictions?

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