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Cross-cultural Studies, Deadline June 15, 2015

updated: 
Thursday, April 23, 2015 - 3:47am
Center for Cross-cultural Studies, College of Foreign Languages and Literature, National Chengchi University

Cross-cultural Studies is an international peer-reviewed journal published by Center for Cross-cultural Studies of National Chengchi University, Taipei, Taiwan, and has been indexed in the THCI (Taiwan Humanities Citation Index). It is published biannually and covers Chinese and English publications. The journal has been devoted to offering inter-disciplinary perspectives on cultural/cross-cultural issues and engaging in academic discussions since 2008.

Classics and Early American Literature and Culture (Nov. 6-8, 2015) Portland, OR

updated: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2015 - 7:23pm
PAMLA 2015

Classics and Early American Literature and Culture

Presiding Officer:
Adam Goldwyn, North Dakota State University
Matthew Duques, North Dakota State University

Abstract: The literary and political culture of the early U.S. republic drew heavily from Greek and Roman models. This panel seeks to move beyond previous scholarship, which has focused on the influence of the Classics in North American political discourse, to a wider array of literary and non-literary texts and material cultures.

"Linqua – International Journal of Linguistics, Literature and Culture" (Linqua- LLC)

updated: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2015 - 4:39pm
European Scientific Institute

The "Linqua – International Journal of Linguistics, Literature and Culture" (Linqua- LLC) is a peer reviewed journal which accepts high quality research articles. It is a quarterly published international journal and is available to all researchers who are interested in publishing their scientific achievements. We welcome submissions focusing on theories, methods and applications in Linguistics, Literature and Culture, both articles and book reviews. All articles must be in English.

Women on Trial - RSA Boston 2016 - May 15, 2015

updated: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2015 - 4:33pm
Dr Derek Dunne (Fribourg) and Dr Toria Johnson (St Andrews)

What did it mean to be a woman in early modern legal systems?

Drawing on a wide range of historical and literary examples – from Anne Askew to Mary Stuart, A Warning for Fair Women to The Winter's Tale – these sessions seek to bring together the latest research on the female in early modern legal contexts. By considering the idea of the woman as witness, litigant, and defendant; by imagining the role of the early modern courtroom in the shaping of female identity; and by examining contemporary literary portrayals of the plight of 'women before the law', these sessions will attend to the myriad ways in which women were placed 'on trial' in the early modern period.

Call for Reviews

updated: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2015 - 1:49pm
Lifewriting Annual: Biographical and Autobiographical Studies

We currently have the following books for review

Hans Renders and Binne De Hann (eds.), Theoretical Discussions of Biography: Approaches from History, Microhistory, and Life Writing (Brill, 2014)

Howard Eland, Walter Benjamin: A Critical Life (Harvard, 2015)

Kecia Ali, The Lives of Muhammad (Harvard, 2015)

Sarah H. Jacoby, Love and Liberation: Autobiographical Writings of the Tibetan Buddhist Visionary Sera Khandro (Columbia, 2014)

Ian H. Magedera, Outsider Biographies (Rodopi, 2014)

Christopher S. Celenza, Machiavelli: A Portrait (Harvard, 2015)

Julie Rak, "Boom! Manufacturing Memoir for the Popular Market" (WLU, 2013)

Paul Sorrentino, A Life of Fire: Stephen Crane (Harvard, 2015)

Unity and Division in the History of Art

updated: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2015 - 9:18am
Cleveland Symposium/Department of Art History and Art, Case Western Reserve University

CALL FOR PAPERS
Unity and Division in the History of Art
41st Annual Cleveland Symposium
Friday, October 23, 2015
The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, Ohio

In what ways can the visual arts unite or divide humanity? How can their subjects and functions stir us to collaboration or lead to disagreement, apathy, or even war? How do objects themselves change when their relationships to one another, or to the viewer, are altered or rearranged?

CFP Edited Collection- Religion, Resistance and Gender in Caribbean Cultural Production , Deadline June 15

updated: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2015 - 2:26am
Jennifer Donahue

We are seeking essays for an edited collection entitled Religion, Resistance and Gender in Caribbean Cultural Production. The collection aims to add to the understanding of the Caribbean region by studying the connection between religion, resistance and gender in Caribbean literature, film and music. In particular, the collection will develop dialogue on Caribbean literature by and about women and will examine how creative expression functions as a form of subversion.

Requiem: Utopia Vs. Dystopia

updated: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2015 - 8:35pm
Mariam Fawaz

Few of us are actually able to empathize with the hardships of war. War brings on hatred, anger, and murder. Tearing citizens away from their homes and family, some are even torn away from the country they know and love. Most of the time, the declaration of a war is to really deconstruct the current governmental system. During the beginning of the 20th century, Russia was facing a whole new system from the results of war. The capital city moved from St. Petersburg to Moscow and the Tsar ruling system was replaced with the communist system. Russia went from an empire to a socioeconomic society in less than a few years. People didn't speak against this drastic change in fear of execution.

Ernest Dowson's "The Garden of Shadow: Critique in Women's Youth and Beauty

updated: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2015 - 8:19pm
Mariam Fawaz

The Victorian period viewed women through limited lenses, by scrutinizing women's value as only in youth and beauty, they are asking them to not grow old. The Victorians associated youth with beauty and innocence because it appeared attractive to men. This essay questions how women's youth was associated with beauty during the Victorian Time Period. By using the metaphor of a dying flower, Ernest Dowson's poem, "The Garden of Shadow" engages in associations between beauty and femininity with youth. This alignment of beauty with youth poses a significant problem for Victorian women who needed a husband in order to socially survive during this time period.

Collections and Questions of Belonging (call for journal article manuscripts)

updated: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2015 - 5:16pm
Collections: A Journal for Museum and Archives Professionals Published by Rowman and Littlefield

Belonging and possession have long been treated as foundational to the missions and activities of museums and archives in how they connote, establish, explain, and demonstrate the ways collections belong to them; determine and express who possesses custody, ownership and control of artifacts; and, by extension, consider the knowledge surrounding objects, makers, places of origin and residence that they supply. Typically, museums and archives express their interests in possessing collections through practices of acquisition, loan, attribution, provenance, exhibition, scholarship, conservation, and rights and reproductions.

Carnivalization and the Carnivalesque Due by May 29

updated: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2015 - 2:47pm
Georgia and Carolinas College English Association at SAMLA

For its 2015 SAMLA panel, the Georgia and Carolinas College English Association seeks proposals that address the theme of carnivalization and the carnivalesque. As articulated by Mikhail Bakhtin, "carnival celebrated temporary liberation from prevailing truth and from established order; it marked the suspension of all hierarchical rank, privileges, norms, and prohibitions. Carnival was the true feast of time, the feast of becoming, change, and renewal. It was hostile to all that was immortalized and completed." Topics include but are not limited to:
• the liberating subversion of popular humor on the literary and cultural tradition
• the overturning of hierarchies in popular carnival

PAMLA 2015: The Problem of Time in Contemporary Fiction (Nov 6-8; deadline May 15)

updated: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2015 - 2:07pm
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association

The Problem of Time in Contemporary Fiction is a panel that considers a wonderful challenge for both critics and writers: how time informs works of literature. In all fiction, the problem of time is a wonderful challenge: does imbuing a work and its characters with history add necessary depth or can it distract from the problems at hand? Can a writer ask readers to look beyond the final page? Do representations of 'real' time limit the inventiveness of works or are they necessary in allowing readers entry? In looking at both original stories by writers exploring innovative approaches to time as well as critical papers about already published works, this panel will consider the problem – if it's a problem at all – of time in contemporary fiction.

(dis)junctions UC Riverside Graduate Conference 2015 -- Nov. 2-3, 2015

updated: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2015 - 1:32pm
(dis)junctions Graduate Conference / University of California, Riverside

(dis)junctions 2015: Strange Bedfellows

"Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows."-Shakespeare's The Tempest (2.2)

University of California, Riverside's (dis)junctions conference invites papers and panels that push at the boundary of contemporary scholarship. Our critical focus, "Strange Bedfellows," is geared specifically toward innovative and interdisciplinary approaches to cultural, literary and theoretical texts. We are looking particularly for scholarship that emerges from the disjunction of incongruent forms, that thrives on the border of the unfamiliar, and that transgresses the boundary of the expected.

Call for papers Deadline:15/05/2015

updated: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2015 - 12:57pm
the quint: an interdisciplinary quarterly from the north

The quint's twenty ninth issue is issuing a call for theoretically informed and historically grounded submissions of scholarly interest—as well as creative writing, original art, interviews, and reviews of books. The deadline for this call is 15th May 2015—but please note that we accept manu/digi-scripts at any time.

quint guidelines

All contributions accompanied by a short biography will be forwarded to a member of the editorial board. Manuscripts must not be previously published or submitted for publication elsewhere while being reviewed by the quint's editors or outside readers.

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