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Literary Histories of Science: Race, Gender, and Class

updated: 
Tuesday, March 24, 2015 - 11:33am
Leila A. McNeill/MMLA 2015 Convention

In the history of science, it has been well-documented that institutionalized science and professional scientific circles actively and systematically excluded people from their ranks based on gender, race, and class. However, what has been underrepresented is the scientific work and endeavors of the marginalized groups themselves. This session seeks to recover some of these excluded voices and stories by investigating the creative, alternative ways that these groups participated in scientific discourse.

Call for Book Proposals—Engagements with Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, March 24, 2015 - 10:15am
Daniel Robinson, Series Editor / Routledge

As the series editor for Engagements with Literature, a new series from Routledge, I am interested in receiving proposals for books that might suit the remit of the series, described below. The series launches this fall with two exciting titles—Engagements with Narrative and Engagements with Close Reading. Two other titles—Engagements with Nature Writing and Engagements with Contemporary Critical Theory—are in progress.

If you have an idea for a book in this series, please contact me at litengagements@gmail.com. I am open to considering any topics that may suit the description below. I would like to know what your experience is as a scholar, author, and teacher.

MMLA 2015 English I: English Literature before 1800

updated: 
Tuesday, March 24, 2015 - 8:49am
Kathleen Burt / MMLA

How the sciences and arts were connected and how they were distinguished in theory, practice, and literature evolved considerably from the medieval period, through the Renaissance, and into the Enlightenment. The relationships between two areas are often complex and varied by genre, author, or even text. This panel welcomes papers that address any aspect of the arts and the sciences.

Reminder: etum special issue CfP: mind the time

updated: 
Tuesday, March 24, 2015 - 6:26am
ejournal for theatre and media / etum

Special Issue: mind the time – time and/in theatre and the media

please scroll down for english version

Etum lädt Manuskripte für ein Special Issue zum Thema "mind the time - Zeit und/im
Theater sowie Zeit und/in Medien" ein.

CFP for Teaching Popular Culture for NEPCA Conference Papers

updated: 
Tuesday, March 24, 2015 - 5:32am
Northeast Popular/American Culture Association

The Northeast Popular/American Culture Association is seeking papers on popular and American culture, broadly construed, for its annual fall conference to be held on Friday October 30 and Saturday October 31, 2015, on the campus of Colby-Sawyer College in New London, NH. NEPCA prides itself on holding conferences that emphasize sharing ideas in a non-competitive and supportive environment. We welcome proposals from graduate students, junior faculty, and senior scholars. NEPCA conferences offer intimate and nurturing sessions in which new ideas and works-in-progress can be aired, as well as completed projects.
Black and white photo of an old classroom.

[UPDATE] Reminder: NARRATIVE AND THE NOVEL/THE NOVEL AS NARRATIVE Abstracts to be Submitted by April 1st

updated: 
Tuesday, March 24, 2015 - 1:15am
The University of New South Wales, Australia

A symposium hosted by the Centre for Modernism Studies in Australia

Saturday 16th of May, 2015

The novel as a distinct genre of prose emerged in the period of modernity. From the eighteenth century, marked by scholars as the period of the 'rise of the novel', to the late twentieth century, during which the trope of 'the death of the novel' gained cultural traction, the novel has sought to both draw upon and distinguish itself from other narrative genres, from history, biography, memoir, and travelogues, to film, television, and digital storytelling.

Catwalk: The Journal of Fashion, Beauty and Style

updated: 
Tuesday, March 24, 2015 - 12:04am
Interdisciplinary Press Global Interdisciplinary Research Studies series, Oxford UK

Catwalk: The Journal of Fashion, Beauty and Style, a blind peer reviewed, high production value, illustrated, interdisciplinary journal published in Oxford, UK. Accepting 300 word abstracts for proposed article consideration. We publish historians, literary critics, cultural studies, gender and sexuality, classical studies, medievalists,Victorian, and post-colonial scholars, as well as articles exploring fashion, beauty and style by museum curators, artists, and social scientists. www.catwalkjournal.net

[DEADLINE APPROACHING] CFP: Toy Stories: The Toy as Hero

updated: 
Monday, March 23, 2015 - 11:44pm
Tanya Jones, M.Ed & Chris Stoneley

Abstracts are being welcomed for a proposed collection examining the toy as hero. Toys, a celebrated part of childhood and often key figures in children's imaginative play, have a fantastic history of heroism in print and on film. Open to examinations of literature, comics, and film, the collection seeks to be a repository of original essays that analyze the roles toys play as protectors of the child(ren) they love, as heroes of their own stories, or as champions for the greater good.

[Registration Open Now] Silence: A Semiotics of (in)Significance

updated: 
Monday, March 23, 2015 - 7:47pm
University of Liverpool

Silence: A Semiotics of (in)Significance, University of Liverpool, 1-3 July 2015

<<< Last chance to submit abstracts: 30 March 2015 >>>

The conference proceedings will be published as a special issue of the International Journal of Literature and Psychology, and will include a separate edited volume on "silence". Submissions for the proceedings should be received no later than
30 April 2015.

Flyer
http://melancholyandpain.liv.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/Silence-Fl...

Race and Revolution (MSA 17)

updated: 
Monday, March 23, 2015 - 3:30pm
Michael Soto / Trinity University

This panel welcomes papers exploring how creative writers and other cultural actors understood racial identity in light of twentieth-century political revolutions. How, for example, did the Afro-diaspora conceive of "blackness" or "Négritude" in the wake of communist upheavals in the Soviet Union (and later Asia, Latin America, and Africa)? How did Marxist revolutionary regimes make space for or undermine cultural expressions that privileged race ahead of social class? What new aesthetic forms (in poetry, fiction, film, theater, visual art, and music) emerged out of contact between racialized subject positions and revolutionary contexts?

Possible topics include (but are hardly limited to):

L.M. Montgomery and Gender

updated: 
Monday, March 23, 2015 - 2:30pm
Laura Robinson/ L.M. Montgomery Institute

From Anne's initial iconic and heartrending cry in Anne of Green Gables—"You don't want me because I'm not a boy"—to the pressure on young men to join the war effort in Rilla of Ingleside, and from the houseful of supportive co-eds in Anne of the Island to the tyrannical grandmother in Jane of Lantern Hill, Lucy Maud Montgomery's work highlights gender roles: how formative and deterministic they seem, and yet mutable they may be. Much Montgomery criticism of the past several decades has regarded her work from a feminist and gender studies perspective. Given that Canada is fast approaching the centenary of women's suffrage in the province of Manitoba (1916) and nationally (1918), the twelfth biennial conference hosted by the L.M.

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