category: travel writing

CFP-Scritture Migranti- International Journal Dedicated to Migrant Writing-Univ. of Bologna (Italy)

full name / name of organization: 
Scritture Migranti-University of Bologna (Italy)- Italian Studies Department
contact email: 
redazione.scritturemigranti@unibo.it

CALL FOR PAPERS

CFP: Anti-Democracy Agenda Symposium 2010 (in the Swiss Alps, 8-10 November 2010)

full name / name of organization: 
Sussex Centre for the Individual and Society (SCIS)
contact email: 
e.kofmel@sussexcentre.org

Please circulate widely!

CALL FOR PAPERS

Anti-Democracy Agenda Symposium 2010

Location: Gottfried-Semper Villa Garbald, part of the Collegium Helveticum

International Summer School “Fictionalizing the World?” in Munich (August 2010)

full name / name of organization: 
PhD programme "Literature" at Munich University
contact email: 
wiefarn@lrz.uni-muenchen.de

Fiction and Reality. Exploring Positions in a Complex Relationship

2010 Summer School in Munich, Germany

Text, Transmission, Reception - 28-29/10/2010 (CFP until 15/06/2010)

full name / name of organization: 
Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen, Netherlands
contact email: 
a.lardinois@let.ru.nl

Text, Transmission, Reception

Call for papers

Radboud University Nijmegen
October 28 and 29, 2010

[UPDATE] Diasporic Consciousness: Literatures from the Postcolonial World 31.07.2010

full name / name of organization: 
Dr. Smriti Singh, Indian Institute of Technology Patna; Dr. Achal Sinha, St. Xavier's, Ranchi
contact email: 
smriti@iitp.ac.in/smritichotu@gmail.com/sinhachal@gmail.com

Due to globalization, multiculturalism and migration, there has been a change in the outlook of the people.

Melville and Rome: Empire–Democracy–Belief–Art; Rome, Italy; 22-26 June 2011

full name / name of organization: 
The Melville Society and Dept. of Foreign Literatures, University of Roma (Sapienza)
contact email: 
engjlb@hofstra.edu; giorgio.mariani@uniroma1.it; go.poole@libero.it

Melville and Rome
Empire – Democracy – Belief – Art
The Eighth International Melville Conference
Rome: 22-26 June 2011
PRESENTED BY
The Melville Society
in collaboration with

{UPDATE]--(Re)Constructing the American West--SAMLA 2010

full name / name of organization: 
South Atlantic Modern Language Association
contact email: 
engale@langate.gsu.edu

In his essay “Walking,” Henry David Thoreau says, “We go eastward to realize history and study the works of art and literature, retracing the steps of the race; we go westward as into the future

New Cartographies: Mapping Identity Politics in Theatre and Dance

full name / name of organization: 
American Society for Theatre Research (ASTR), Theatre Library Association (TLA), Congress on Research in Dance (CORD)
contact email: 
jocelynbuckner@gmail.com

ASTR/TLA/CORD 2010 WORKING SESSION CALL FOR PARTICIPANTS

Session Title:

New Cartographies: Mapping Identity Politics in Theatre and Dance

Session Leader(s):

[UPDATE] REGISTRATION NOW OPEN John Buchan and the Idea of Modernity (10th July 2010)

full name / name of organization: 
Kate Macdonald and Nathan Waddell
contact email: 
buchan-conference@hotmail.com

Plenary Speakers: Douglas Gifford (University of Glasgow) on Buchan's response to his Victorian literary precursors, and Douglas Kerr (University of Hong Kong) on Buchan, myth, and "The Dancing Floor"

WSQ Special Issue: Ruin

full name / name of organization: 
Women's Studies Quarterly
contact email: 
wsqassociate@gmail.com

Call for Papers: Ruin
Guest Editors: Sarah Chinn and Rupal Oza

This issue of WSQ explores the multiple valences of ruin. While ruin clearly follows from disaster – from economic collapse to earthquakes to floods to volcanic eruptions to political and social unrest – it is also highly gendered: what is more easily ruined, after all, than a virtuous woman’s reputation?

Ruin can exist in the singular as a catastrophe and in the plural as an aesthetic, architectural, and historical pleasure. Mourning at a ruin can entail grief and also nostalgia for a world before disintegration and decay. Ruin suggests both temporal and spatial change, evoking a time and a place before as well as meditating on the here and now.

The specter of ruin generates strategies to forestall it: protectionism towards women and children, as well as other marginalized populations; economic bailouts to prevent the possibility of collapse; the closing down or limiting of borders; emergency warning systems; militarization and weaponization of society. And yet in this issue we also hope to pose a sometimes unthinkable question: what is so bad about ruin? Why do we fear the collapse of systems that might in fact be currently unworkable or even destructive?

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