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Russia and the Middle East in the Premodern Period

updated: 
Sunday, February 1, 2015 - 7:24pm
Suha Kudsieh

Modern Language Association (MLA) Annual Convention
2016 7–10 January, Austin

CFP for a special panel:

*Russia and the Middle East in the Premodern Period*

Description: The panel examines cultural interaction between pre-modern Russia and the Middle East in the areas of travel/pilgrimage; diplomatic and religious missions; trade; knowledge exchange (incl. book translations). Papers on Arabic sources are especially welcome.

Please submit your 25-35- word proposal by March 9, 2015 to: Kudsieh - at - gmail.com (please remove spaces and underscores from e-mail address).

Please remember to include your name, affiliation, e-mail, and A/V requirements.

The Edwidge Danticat Society-The 29th Annual MELUS Conference, April 9-12, 2015 in Athens, Georgia

updated: 
Sunday, February 1, 2015 - 6:31pm
The Edwidge Danticat Society

The Edwidge Danticat Society invites papers for its inaugural panel at the 29th Annual MELUS Conference. In keeping with the theme of this year's conference, "Arrivals and Departures in U.S. Multi-Ethnic Literatures" we welcome papers that analyze Edwidge Danticat's work (activist, fiction, film, non-fiction) in relationship to immigration arrivals and departures, including presentations that seek to address, but are not limited to: citizenship rulings, detention, mobility, and transportation. The Edwidge Danticat Society invites proposals for 15 -minute presentations, possible topics include:

CFP MLA 2016 (Austin, 1/7-1/10) Special Session "Cervantes on the Early Modern English Stage"

updated: 
Sunday, February 1, 2015 - 2:47pm
Josephine Hardman

MLA special session invites papers exploring the influence of Cervantes on early modern English drama. How did English playwrights in the seventeenth century translate, adapt, rewrite, and transport Cervantes onto the London stage? Papers that investigate theatrical adaptations of Cervantes's work beyond Don Quijote are especially welcome, as are papers that redefine and/or broaden our understanding of "translation." This session will consider questions such as: what do English translations or adaptations of Cervantes reveal about Anglo-Spanish relations during the period, about cross-cultural textual exchange, and about the political and ideological uses of translation?

Black Poetry after the Black Arts Movement NEH Summer Institute July 19-August 1, 2015

updated: 
Sunday, February 1, 2015 - 2:31pm
Project on the History of Black Writing, University of Kansas

Upcoming NEH Summer Institute "Black Poetry after the Black Arts Movement" to be held July 19-August 1, 2015 at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, KS. Application deadline is March 2, 2015.

Check out www.blackpoetry.ku.edu to learn more about this exciting two-week opportunity for twenty-five college and university teachers (including at least three advanced graduate students), filled with innovative scholarship, rich dialog, and fertile opportunities for advancing research.

The stipend for this Institute will be $2,100 for each NEH Summer Scholar to help cover travel, housing and food.

The application deadline is March 2, 2015.

International James Baldwin Conference 26-28 May 2016

updated: 
Sunday, February 1, 2015 - 5:06am
The American University of Paris

International Conference: "A Language to Dwell In": James Baldwin, Paris, and International Visions
At The American University of Paris
26-28 May 2016

Call for Papers

CALL FOR ESSAYS on African Issues in the Past, Present, and Future

updated: 
Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 11:15pm
Menes Tau/The Volta Times

The Volta Times invites submissions for its online publication at voltatimes.com.

The Volta Times offers lively, informative essays and bold perspectives on timely topics that are important to global African communities, whether directed at Africans on the continent or in the diaspora abroad. We welcome insightful commentary on news stories, summaries of research, book critiques, film critiques, short stories, and personal essays on topics such as politics, the economy, education, the environment, sports, religion, race, and culture, among other topics.

Essays should be 500-1500 words in length and written for a general, but educated, audience.

Language Change, Shifting Borders, and Identity Construction (MLA, Jan 7-10, 2016); deadline 3/15/15

updated: 
Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 9:10pm
MLA Forum on Language Change

The Executive Committee on Language Change at the Modern Language Association (MLA) is accepting papers for a session to be held at the annual conference in January 2016 in Austin. We seek papers that examine how language change relates to linguistic identity construction and crossing borderlands (geographical, political, ethnic, social, perceptual, historical, religious). Papers that address the theoretical and empirical relevance of the concept of border to research in language variation and change from interdisciplinary perspectives are especially welcome. Please send 300-word abstracts by March 15 to Tara Williams (tara.williams@oregonstate.edu).

Rethinking the 'L' in MLA (Jan 7-10, 2016); deadline 3/15/15

updated: 
Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 9:08pm
MLA Forum on Language Change

The MLA Forum on Language Change invites proposals for a panel on "Rethinking the 'L' in MLA." Papers might address questions like: What counts as a modern language? What value do linguistic issues and less-commonly taught languages have in the MLA? How can they inform literary studies?

The Modern Language Association convention will be held in Austin, TX on January 7-10, 2016. Please send 300-word abstracts to Tara Williams (tara.williams@oregonstate.edu) by 15 March 2015.

The Postcolonial Subject in Transit: Migration, Borders and Subjectivity in African Diaspora Literature ( May 18,2015)

updated: 
Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 5:52pm
Delphine Fongang

The research focus in this edited book collection is to examine the transitional subjectivities of postcolonial African diaspora subjects evident in emergent African diaspora literatures constructed in various metropolises of the West. The diaspora becomes the material condition that produces particular literary creations as writers across different cultural locations address the concept of "belonging or not belonging" in metropolitan spaces. African diasporic subjects never fully belong anywhere as they constantly struggle to assert their subjectivities in spaces that marginalize them. Writers capture the complex ways in which subjects rooted from their homelands must search for place and space in disputed borders and locations in the metropolis.

Proposed Edited Collection: Theorizing Ethnicity in the Chick Lit Genre

updated: 
Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 4:47pm
Erin Hurt

Though the chick lit genre is most often cited as a location for the study of contemporary white women's experiences or perhaps to debate the genre's feminist credentials, it has in the last fifteen years emerged as a site where protagonists of many ethnicities negotiate their cultural identities and notions of national belonging. In novels such as Alisa Valdes Rodriguez's The Dirty Girls Social Club (2003) or Tara FT Sering's Amazing Grace (2008), Latina, African-American, South Asian-American, and Chinese-American protagonists redefine their relationship to the United States, their families, and their heritage while at the same time they attempt to achieve, in typical chick lit fashion, some measure of success.

Speculative Fiction – SAMLA – November 13-15, 2015

updated: 
Friday, January 30, 2015 - 5:19pm
Lisa Wenger Bro / Middle Georgia State College

Speculative fiction covers a broad range of narrative styles and genres. The cohesive element that pulls works together is that there is some "unrealistic" element, whether it's magical, supernatural, or even a futuristic, technological development: works that fall into the category stray from conventional realism in some way. For this reason, speculative fiction can be quite broad, including everything from fantasy and magical realism to horror and science fiction—from Gabriel García Márquez to H.P. Lovecraft to William Gibson. This panel aims to explore those unrealistic elements and all their varied implications about society, politics, economics, and more.

Personas in Production

updated: 
Friday, January 30, 2015 - 2:51pm
School of The Arts, The University of Northampton

8 April 2015, School of the Arts, The University of Northampton
(Hosted by The Postcolonial Visual Culture, Performance and Narrative Research Group within The Centre for Contemporary Narrative and Cultural Theory )

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