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twentieth century and beyond

New Voices 2017-18: Art and Movement

updated: 
Monday, July 10, 2017 - 12:48pm
Association for Art History
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 4, 2017

Association for Art History
New Voices 2017-18: Art and Movement

University of Birmingham
11 January 2018

Keynote speaker: Professor Khadija von Zinnenburg Carroll

Reminder: CFP Aug 1 Deadline, SFS Special Issue: Frankenstein at 200

updated: 
Monday, July 10, 2017 - 12:47pm
Nicole Lobdell and Michael Griffin
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Science Fiction Studies is currently soliciting proposals for a July 2018 special issue celebrating the bicentennial of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818), a work that forever changed the genre of science fiction. In Frankenstein, Shelley experimented not only with subject matter, new scientific inventions and their many terrifying and horrific possibilities, but also narrative and form. Her use of multiple frame narratives, nested one within another, was a notable shift from the eighteenth-century novels she grew up reading, and her merging of popular culture’s fascination with science and the Gothic broadened the emerging genre of science fiction.

Reimagining Ecologies of Time/Place in Postcolonial Fiction (NeMLA 2018)

updated: 
Monday, July 10, 2017 - 12:47pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Postcolonialism and ecocriticism have often been at odds with one another for the main reason that postcoloniality typically concerns itself with issues of displacement and diaspora, while ecocritical practice attends to a very specific ethics of place. However, as critics such as David Mazel argue, there exists an ability to interpret the land through the lens of a “poststructuralist ecocriticism” that encompasses “a way of reading environmental literature and canonical landscapes that attends concurrently to the discursive construction of both…environment and subjectivity,” creating an “analysis of the environment as a powerful site for naturalizing constructs of race, class, nationality, and gender” (American Literary Environmentalism, xxi).

"Writing Hong Kong": Call for Submissions

updated: 
Monday, July 10, 2017 - 12:42pm
Cha: An Asian Literary Journal
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

1 July 2017 marked the 20th anniversary of Hong Kong's handover to China. This year also happens to be the tenth anniversary of Cha: An Asian Literary Journal. And so while we are immensely proud of the work from and about Asia we normally publish, we felt that to commemorate these two events it was time to take a closer look at the city we call home and love: Hong Kong.

Modernisms and the Anthropocene (Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture since 1900)

updated: 
Monday, July 10, 2017 - 12:41pm
Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture since 1900, February 22-24, 2018, at the University of Louisville
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, August 1, 2017

This critical panel or roundtable invites proposals from scholars working at the intersection of modernist and Anthropocene studies. Presentations might engage with the following quandaries and/or themes, as well as unlimited others:  

Life Plus 2 Meters: How will we (not) adapt to life in a climate-changed world

updated: 
Friday, July 7, 2017 - 9:20am
David Zetland/Leiden University College
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 15, 2017

We’ve just finished a successful Kickstarter that raised $660 from backers.  That money will fund prizes for authors who submit the best “visions” (short essays of 800-1,000 words) of how we might (not) adapt to life in a climate-changed world.

Visions are “fictional” because they take place in the future, but they are based on the storyteller’s imagination or practitioner’s knowledge.

Anyone can submit a story or perspective no matter the author’s background, qualifications or job.

There will be four categories of prizes:

“living said”: Modernist Rhythm, Visual Form, and Cummings' Cultural Aesthetics

updated: 
Friday, July 7, 2017 - 9:18am
E.E. Cummings Society
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 8, 2017

The E. E. Cummings Society and the Society's journal, Spring, invites abstracts for 20-minute papers for the 46th annual Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture since 1900, February 22-24, 2018, at the University of Louisville (http://www.thelouisvilleconference.com).  Taking up what Cummings means by “my specialty is living said,” this session explores Cummings’ various modernist/avant-gardist experiments with rhythm and sound that came to shape his new art and new poetry.

Call for Proposals and Manuscripts

updated: 
Friday, July 7, 2017 - 9:17am
Aporetic Press
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Aporetic Press is committed to publishing works that do not fall comfortably into accepted categories and established genres.

We are particularly interested in subjects which are not in vogue but nonetheless represent cutting edge thought, dynamic scholarship (including para-academic work) and unconventional creativity. We are willing to publish on the neglected and the niche providing the work is creative and original in approach.

Trans-Migration: Corporal, Spatial, and Symbolic

updated: 
Friday, July 7, 2017 - 9:14am
Animal de fondo
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

 

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

Trans-Migration: Corporal, Spatial, and Symbolic Mobility

 Submission deadline: Saturday, September 30, 2017

Publication: January 2018

 

The New Urban Gothic Edited Collection Call for Chapters

updated: 
Monday, July 10, 2017 - 8:29am
Holly-Gale Millette, Southampton University, Ruth Heholt, Falmouth University
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Urban Gothic is a subgenre of Gothic fiction, Gothic crime fiction, and television whose narratives spring from discourse on industrial and post-industrial urban society. Often dystopic, it was pioneered in the mid-19th century in Britain and the United States and developed in serialisations such as R. L. Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886); into novels such as Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890). Much has been written on 19th century Anglo-centred Urban Gothic fiction and vampiristic, monstrous Urban Gothic, but less has been written on the 21st century reimagining and re-serialisation of the Urban Gothic in mechanised, altered, disabled, and dystopic states of being.

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