Subscribe to RSS - twentieth century and beyond

twentieth century and beyond

Handbook on Violence in Film and Media

updated: 
Thursday, May 17, 2018 - 11:21am
Steve Choe
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, August 1, 2018

This is a call for proposals for a Handbook on the topic of violence in film and media. The volume will be published by Palgrave Macmillian.

The Handbook will consist of between 20 and 25 chapters of between 6000 and 8000 words each. All contributions must be in the English language. The Handbook aims to function as a reference work for scholars and students in film and media studies. Contributions should present original research and thinking that result in broad claims about violence in film and media.

At this stage, I am seeking expressions of interest from scholars who would like to contribute to the collection. These should consist of:

Extended deadline: Magic and Witchcraft on Stage and Screen

updated: 
Thursday, May 17, 2018 - 11:21am
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Deadline is extended to May 30 for papers for a special session of PAMLA, the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association.

 

Proposals are invited for a Special Session of PAMLA (Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association) 2018, which will meet November 9-11, 2018, in Bellingham, Washington. The conference theme is “Acting, Roles, Stages,” and we will be contributing papers on ways in which magic and witchcraft have been represented dramatically over the centuries.

 

Registration Open - Death and Celebrity

updated: 
Thursday, May 17, 2018 - 11:20am
University of Portsmouth
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, May 31, 2018

We are pleased to share the provisional programme for our upcoming symposium, Death and Celebrity at the University of Portsmouth on 6th June 2018.

 

Studies in Crime Writing

updated: 
Thursday, May 17, 2018 - 11:20am
Studies in Crime Writing
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 7, 2019

Newberry College is pleased to invite submissions for the second issue of Studies in Crime Writing, which will appear in the fall of 2019. Studies in Crime Writing is a peer-reviewed, open-access, online scholarly journal dedicated to crime writing, including true crime, thrillers, prison writing, detective fiction, and noir. The journal's focus is on written work, rather than film, computer games, or other electronic media. We are open to a variety of theoretical and scholarly approaches, and to bibliographic and textual scholarship as well.

Marx & the City

updated: 
Thursday, May 17, 2018 - 11:19am
Arcadia University, The College of Global Studies, London Center
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 3, 2018

Friday, 2 November 2018

16-17 Southampton Place, London, WC1A 2AJ

Confirmed speakers: Professor Ursula Huws; Professor Donald Sassoon; Dr Lindsey German

 

Afterlives of Historical Violence in American Literature and Activism

updated: 
Wednesday, May 30, 2018 - 4:43pm
SAMLA 2018
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, June 10, 2018

Per William Faulkner’s famous phrase, “The past is never dead. It’s not even past.” This is to say that the forms of social inequality that characterize contemporary life and drive contemporary activism are rooted in long histories of violence. Yet over time, as these histories extend not only throughout individual lives but also across generations, they can become so naturalized that they run the risk of being functionally invisible.

SAMLA 90 - AIDS in French and Francophone Narratives / Le SIDA dans les narrations françaises et francophones

updated: 
Thursday, May 17, 2018 - 11:15am
Olivier Le Blond
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 4, 2018

The AIDS crisis in France and Francophone countries has seen the emergence of a “littérature SIDA,” as well as artistic expressions through various media such as photography or films. On August 23rd 2017, the movie 120 battements par minute (BPM), shed a light on the first years of activism of Act Up-Paris in the early 1990s.  In April 2018, France Culture’s radio show LSD, La série documentaire, dedicated four days to the topic “Quand la création raconte le SIDA.” Despite the medical advances, both the movie and radio show reminded viewers and listeners of a duty to remember the AIDS crisis. This panel will focus on the representations of AIDS and the accompanying activism in literature, cinema and arts from French and Francophone artists.

Infinite Rust Literary Journal, Call for Submissions

updated: 
Friday, May 11, 2018 - 2:15pm
Texas Southern University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

INFINITE RUST is Texas Southern University's quarterly online literary arts journal showcasing creative work. We publish short fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, and essays, as well as art and photography. The goal of our publication is to assemble a variety of literary and artistic styles and a broad range of voices, perspectives, and life experiences.

The theme of our Fall 2018 issue is “Home.” We are interested in your perspective relating to ideas such as the meaning of home, immigration, marginalization, nationalism, ownership, comfort, security, displacement, boundaries, and identity.

Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA) Conference CFP, "Playing Our Part: Social Hierarchy and the Performance of Class in Literature"

updated: 
Friday, May 11, 2018 - 6:24pm
John D. Schwetman / University of Minnesota Duluth
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, May 30, 2018

While historically a product of birthright, and more recently associated with merit, social class has always presented itself as a set of expectations setting the stage for encounters between unfamiliar people. Whether sincerely or in masquerade, everyone adopts a social class as a role to be played before an audience. In line with this year’s conference theme “Acting, Roles, and Stages,” this panel, examines social class as performance and focuses on literary works across genres and eras that present class accordingly. From estates satire to the minstrel show, from social realism to the theater of the absurd, we will consider ways that literature either enacts the performance of class or dramatizes its enactment.

Pages