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[UPDATE] Mapping Identity - April 15th Deadline

updated: 
Monday, April 8, 2013 - 12:28am
Megan Cannella/PAMLA Conference

In this session, papers will look at the different ways place can determine one's identity. Whether discussing immigrant narratives, narratives of displacement, coming of age narratives or something all-together different, geographic location determines a great deal about one's personal narrative. Place can determine as much about a person as his or genetic history, making the relationship between identity and place subject to boundless exploration.

See more and submit proposals at: http://www.pamla.org/2013/topics/mapping-identity#sthash.dF5hJvN2.dpuf

"Many straunge and horrible events" – Omens and Prophecies in Histories and Tragedies by Shakespeare and His Contemporaries

updated: 
Sunday, April 7, 2013 - 3:29pm
Shakespeare 450

(This seminar is part of 'Shakespeare 450', the international week-long conference in Paris celebrating the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare's birth in April 21-27, 2014.)

"To make short, in this year sundry woeful, and cruel evils, together with many strange and horrible events shall sensibly appear, which shall principally molest and afflict the westward countries." [1]

Legal Perspectives on Shakespearean Theatre

updated: 
Sunday, April 7, 2013 - 3:26pm
Shakespeare 450

(This seminar is part of 'Shakespeare 450', the international week-long conference in Paris celebrating the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare's birth in April 21-27, 2014.)

'In this distracted globe'?: Cognitive Shakespeare

updated: 
Sunday, April 7, 2013 - 3:23pm
Shakespeare 450

(This seminar is part of 'Shakespeare 450', the international week-long conference in Paris celebrating the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare's birth in April 21-27, 2014.)

The two sentinels protecting the castle from unfamiliar shapes in Hamlet, the cognitive mind-game revolving around the 'ocular proof' in Othello, or the mechanisms of the dream in A Midsummer Night's Dream: Shakespeare's plays function in different way as cognitive laboratories that provide insight into "this distracted globe" by displaying the workings of the mind. Influenced by early modern concepts of memory, the spirits of body and mind, and theories on (visual) perception, Shakespeare's plays approach the topic of 'cognition' from various angles.

Global Shakespeare as Methodology

updated: 
Sunday, April 7, 2013 - 3:22pm
Shakespeare 450

(This seminar is part of 'Shakespeare 450', the international week-long conference in Paris celebrating the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare's birth in April 21-27, 2014.)

Shakespeare and the Visual

updated: 
Sunday, April 7, 2013 - 3:20pm
Shakespeare 450

(This seminar is part of 'Shakespeare 450', the international week-long conference in Paris celebrating the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare's birth in April 21-27, 2014.)

Shakespeare on Screen: The Romances

updated: 
Sunday, April 7, 2013 - 3:17pm
Shakespeare 450

(This seminar is part of 'Shakespeare 450', the international week-long conference in Paris celebrating the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare's birth in April 21-27, 2014.)

This seminar invites papers on screen adaptations, screen appropriations or screen quotations of Shakespeare's romances: Pericles, Cymbeline, The Winter's Tale and The Tempest.

A variety of approaches will be welcomed. The papers may examine, among other aspects:

Due September 30, 2013 "The lifting of an environment to expression": American Representations of Place special issue

updated: 
Sunday, April 7, 2013 - 11:54am
Miranda, University of Toulouse le Mirail, volume editors Wendy Harding and Gretchen Murphy

A special issue of Miranda, a peer reviewed on-line journal
(http://blogs.univ-tlse2.fr/miranda/)
will take up the provocative question of the relation between places and their representations in American culture. It will be scheduled for publication in 2014. Papers should be submitted by September 30, 2013. Send inquiries to Wendy Harding, University of Toulouse-Le Mirail (harding@univ-tlse2.fr) and Gretchen Murphy, University of Texas-Austin (gretchen@austin.utexas.edu)

EXTENDED DEADLINE: Dissent: An Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference

updated: 
Sunday, April 7, 2013 - 11:40am
Dalhousie Association of Graduate Students in English

On December 11th 2012, Chief Theresa Spence of the Attawapiskat First Nation in Northern Ontario declared a hunger strike to critique the federal government's abuses of treaty rights and First Nations communities, and to draw attention to the detrimental and incalculable effects of Bill C-45 on Canada's rivers and lakes. Across the country, local chapters of Idle No More acted in solidarity: orchestrating flash mobs, drum circles, demonstrations, and teach-ins to inform the public about the impact of this legislation on First Nations and non-First Nations alike. It is this strong, positive dissenting action that led to nationwide coverage of the movement, and to solidarity protests around the world.

The Artemis Archetype in Fiction, Film, and Television

updated: 
Sunday, April 7, 2013 - 3:19am
Susan Redington Bobby (Wesley College), Eileen M. Harney (University of Alaska Fairbanks)/McFarland and Company

Call for Papers: The Artemis Archetype in Fiction, Film, and Television

The Goddess Artemis is independent, self-reliant, strong, loyal, and nurturing. She is the divine huntress, sister, protectress, slayer, and comforter. As such, the goddess provides an alternative feminine role model to the damsel-in-distress. Unlike many active female characters, those who emulate Artemis, despite often being considered conventionally attractive, do not rely on appearance or sexuality to achieve power or accomplish tasks.

Sirens - 10/10 - 10/13; deadline May 10

updated: 
Saturday, April 6, 2013 - 7:32pm
Cora Anderson / Narrate Conferences

CALL FOR PROPOSALS: Sirens
Stevenson, Washington
October 10–13, 2013
A conference on women in fantasy literature presented by Narrate Conferences, Inc.

Sirens, a conference focused on literary contributions by women to the fantasy genre and on fantasy works with prominent female characters, will take place October 10–13, 2013, in Stevenson, Washington, near Portland, Oregon. The conference seeks papers, panels, interactive workshops, roundtable discussions, and other presentations suitable for an audience of academics, professionals, educators, librarians, authors, and fantasy readers.

April 15 Deadline -- PAMLA 2013 San Diego (Nov 1-3) -- Special Session: "Ew! Gross! Abjection, Affect, and Bodily Fluids"

updated: 
Saturday, April 6, 2013 - 4:59pm
PAMLA - Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association

Come and join us in sunny San Diego to discuss affect and embodiment. From the bloody birth in Hemingway's "Indian Camp" and Rosasharn Joad's breast milk to Douglass' "cold sweat of death" and Albee's incontinent, old woman A, bodily fluids are liminal markers of transitions in life. This panel invites papers on the affective dimension of bodily fluids in literature and popular culture. Possible topics may include but are not limited to:

- Liminal fluids and transgression
- Bodily fluids and commodification
- Medical discussions reflected in literary texts
- Historical development of one fluid across genres or periods
- Embodied fluids, fluid embodiment

[UPDATE] PAMLA Standing Session on Autobiography. San Diego, CA, Nov 1-3, 2013. Deadline: Apr 15, 2013.

updated: 
Saturday, April 6, 2013 - 11:36am
Tanya Heflin / Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association

We are seeking exceptional papers on all aspects of autobiography, memoir, diary, and life-writing for the standing session on Autobiography at the 111th annual meeting of the PAMLA conference at Bahia Resort Hotel in San Diego from November 1-3, 2013.

Possible topics may include, but are not limited to, the following areas: autobiographic self-representation in new social media; multi-ethnic life-writing; autobiography in the graphic novel; discovery of archive diary; multi-genre forms of narrative life-writing; and the relationship between autobiography and gender, sexual, ethnic, racial, and/or national identities.

[UPDATE] Extended deadline (April 30, 2013) - CFC: Examining Paratextual Theory and its Applications in Digital Culture

updated: 
Saturday, April 6, 2013 - 10:30am
Nadine Desrochers/Universite de Montreal

Editors: Nadine Desrochers, Assistant Professor, École de bibliothéconomie et des sciences de l'information, Université de Montréal, and Daniel Apollon, Associate Professor in Digital Culture, University of Bergen

The editorial team invites chapter proposals for a collective interdisciplinary work to be published in 2014 by IGI Global.

Having received many requests to extend the deadline for proposals, we will be accepting submissions until April 30, 2013.

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