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Imagery and Influence: Hawthorne and Melville

updated: 
Tuesday, December 18, 2012 - 2:29pm
Melville Society & Hawthorne Society

Imagery and Influence: Hawthorne and Melville

This collaborative panel (which may become a roundtable) explores the ways in which Hawthorne and Melville shared influences, influenced each other, and/or incorporated classical images into their work. What specific classical and other literary intertexts did the authors share? In what specific ways did they influence each other while in turn influencing later writers? What is and is not "classical" about their work? What were their sources for classical images, narratives, and themes?

Grad journal special issue: (Non-)Geographical Futures of Comp Lit MARCH 15 2013

updated: 
Tuesday, December 18, 2012 - 12:16pm
Inquire: Journal of Comparative Literature

Issue 3.2 (Summer 2013) 'Neither Here Nor There: The (Non-)Geographical Futures of Comparative Literature'

In this special issue, Inquire invites article submissions that consider the relationship between geography and the study of literature. As always, Inquire encourages intellectual discussions that approach the text from inside and outside, considering the movement of literary artifacts across geographical spaces as well as the significance of geographical movement within literature.

Joint Special Issue: (Non-)Geographical Futures of Comp Lit JUNE 30, 2013

updated: 
Tuesday, December 18, 2012 - 12:10pm
Canadian Review of Comparative Literature/Peking U. Journal of Comparative Literature and World Literature

Recent understandings of world literature have moved away from a focus on delineating canons of geographically-distributed great works, and towards describing a complex process of influence and reaction between increasingly-porous national and linguistic boundaries. As the discipline that most clearly claims responsibility for understanding literature beyond such boundaries, does Comparative Literature need to follow in the tracks of its object of study and somehow deterritorialize itself? As well, what would such a project mean, in terms of new methodologies, objects of study, disciplinary self-conceptions, development of linguistic and literary competencies, and interdepartmental or international research collaborations?

[UPDATE] Working It Out: A Day of Numbers in Early Modern Writing

updated: 
Tuesday, December 18, 2012 - 11:03am
Birkbeck College, London

Call for Papers
Early modern books are full of numbers, representing both practicality and mystery. This multidisciplinary conference explores numbers in British early modern literature and textual
culture. How were numbers and numerical techniques used in drama, dance, and music? What were the practical issues arising from printing numerical texts, and how were numbers represented on the page? How were the index and the cross-reference created and used? To what extent would an early modern audience recognize mathematical references in literary texts and performance? Who would buy an arithmetic book and how might they use it?

LIES 2013: Michele Roberts and Postmodernism, Feminism and Medievalism in Literature in English

updated: 
Tuesday, December 18, 2012 - 11:02am
Department of English Literature and Literary Linguistics at Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Poland

From the early feminists to postmodern protagonists her novels rewrite medieval saints and sinners, Victorian mediums and contemporary visionaries, offering us new perspectives on well known stories and motifs.
As Michele Roberts herself will be our guest of honor, her work is the inspiration for our 2013 Literature in English Symposium but we welcome papers about topics related to postmodern rewriting of history and culture as well as the feminist standpoint on both contemporary and earlier literature in English. Papers in other languages (German, French, Spanish) will also be considered.

REMINDER - Feminism;Influence;Inheritance - Deadline 4 Jan '13

updated: 
Tuesday, December 18, 2012 - 5:18am
School of English and Drama - Queen Mary, University of London

This one-day symposium hosted by the School of English and Drama at Queen Mary, University of London aims to bring together postgraduates and academics to explore how the issues of feminism, influence and inheritance animate or problematize their work and practice in the field of literary study. Through this conference we aim to begin a discussion about the challenges and anxieties, but also the significant rewards of engaging with our substantial feminist inheritance as scholars working in English Studies today. It will seek to consider how contemporary research relates to the rich, complex and extensive history of feminist research in the discipline and explore how new directions in literary study might be informed by the work of the past.

IDEE 2013 : Interaction Design in Educational Environments (IDEE) 2013 [July 3, 2013]

updated: 
Tuesday, December 18, 2012 - 4:28am
IDEE 2013 : Interaction Design in Educational Environments (IDEE) 2013

Call For Papers
During the last few years, new devices have been invading the pacific waters of educational environments. Different kind of tablets, laptops, whiteboards, mobile devices and other exciting computer systems have been introduced in classrooms together with the recurrent claim for which they help to improve the learning process in.
This workshop invites authors to submit contributions on concepts Distributed interaction Design Discussion, applications, techniques or environments where interaction design play a central role by improving the learning process at all levels.

TOPICS OF INTEREST

International Council for Educational Media Conference 2013

updated: 
Tuesday, December 18, 2012 - 3:13am
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

ICEM 2013
we-Learning: Content, Community and Collaboration

Authors are invited to submit abstracts and participate in the 63rd International Council for Educational Media (ICEM) Conference that will be held in Singapore from 1 – 4 October 2013.

The late 1990s saw the emergence of e-Learning. Many schools and institutions have embarked on campus-wide initiatives that comprised content-driven and technology-enhanced pedagogy until the advent of Web 2.0. Now, however, the educational model is undergoing a complete change of approach and both the blended learning model and participative learning have become more possible and meaningful, especially when combined with the changing profile of Gen Y students.

Call for Book Reviewers

updated: 
Monday, December 17, 2012 - 9:49pm
Queensland Review

The Queensland Review (http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=QRE ) is now published by Cambridge University Press and is relaunching its Book Review section. We are searching for scholars of Queensland studies to contribute reviews and review essays in this widening field. Reviewers are welcome to propose a work for review, or to choose from our selection of available review copies.

If you are interested in writing for Queensland Review, please contact the Book Reviews editor, Dr Jessica Gildersleeve, j.gildersleeve@griffith.edu.au.

Transforming Knowledge Dissemination in Quebec and ROC: A Bilingual Roundtable

updated: 
Monday, December 17, 2012 - 9:37pm
Association for Canadian and Quebec Literatures / L'association des littératures canadiennes et québecoises

Transforming Knowledge Dissemination in Quebec and ROC: A Bilingual Roundtable

Co-organized by

Canadian Literature / Littérature canadienne and
Canadian Literature Centre / Centre de littérature canadienne

New Canadian Modernisms: Beyond Centre and Edge

updated: 
Monday, December 17, 2012 - 9:31pm
Association for Canadian and Quebec Literatures / L'association des littératures canadiennes et québecoises

New Canadian Modernisms: Beyond Centre and Edge
Brian Trehearne notes in The Montreal Forties that "the placement of Canadian writing against the backdrop of international modernism is very rare." Situating Canadian modernism in relationship to its international contexts has been discouraged by the centre-periphery model that long dominated modernist studies, one that places Canada "@ the edge," far from the Anglo-American centre. As Susan Stanford Friedman notes, this model assumes that modernist aesthetic and cultural innovations are "first produced in the great culture capitals of Europe and the United States and then exported to…colonies and postcolonial nations … where they exist in diluted and imitative form as 'trickle down' effects."

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