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THE PLEASURES OF IDENTITY: LIVING QUEER (Edited Collection; 12/15 proposal deadline)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 11, 2012 - 7:58pm
Ellen M. Gil-Goméz, Jacqueline Rhodes

As evidenced by recent work such as the Encyclopedia of Gay and Lesbian Popular Culture (2007); LGBTQ America Today: An Encyclopedia (2008); Queers in History: The Comprehensive Encyclopedia of Historical Gays, Lesbians and Bisexuals (2009); and Queer America: A People's GLBT History of the United States (2011), our field has taken an encyclopedic and historical turn. While we applaud these works and see their value, we are less interested in the canonization of LGBTQ voices throughout history than in taking the temperature of old and new activists, artists, and scholars of LGBTQ Studies--what choices have you made (freely or by coercion?), how has the landscape changed since your work began?

[Deadline Reminder: Sept 30] Genre and genus: Categories for Humans and Animals in Early Modern English Literature (NeMLA 2013)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 11, 2012 - 7:21pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

44th Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
March 21-24, 2013
Boston, Massachusetts
Host Institution: Tufts University

This panel explores how literature represents the relationship between humans and animals in a range of early modern texts. How do representations of the mutable boundary between humans and animals differ depending on their generic context? How do concerns about literary kinds relate to and intersect with concerns about species categorization? To what extent does generic mingling and experimentation relate to the varying representations of inter-species similitude and difference? Send 300 word abstracts to Julia Gingerich <7jg32@queensu.ca>

[UPDATE] Transatlantic Travel Narratives: 1850-1918 (NeMLA, March 21-24, 2013 - deadline for submission Sept 30, 2012)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 11, 2012 - 7:05pm
Northeast Modern Language Association

This panel will examine the narrative of the road (tripper) often associated with Modernist accounts of travel. How does transatlantic literature, from the mid-nineteenth century forward, distinguish between travel and tourism? Should we interpret the mass-produced realist novel as a literary analogue to the culture of mass tourism that developed alongside it? Or does the realist novel too offer the potential to 'go off the beaten track,' to resist the tyranny of the predestined itinerary? Please send 300-500-word abstracts to lsimon@uvu.edu.

Creative Writing (Poetry and Fiction) at CEA 2013

updated: 
Tuesday, September 11, 2012 - 5:07pm
College English Association

The College English Association, a gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations on Creative Writing (poetry and fiction) for our 44th annual conference. Submit your proposal at http://www.cea-web.org

We welcome proposals for a fifteen minute reading of original poems and fiction. Please submit sample material which does not necessarily have to be on the conference theme.

Conference Theme: Nature

[UPDATE] Edited Collection on Wes Anderson

updated: 
Tuesday, September 11, 2012 - 5:06pm
Pete Kunze (Louisiana State University)

I seek proposals for original critical essays on the films of Wes Anderson to be included in a possible edited collection.

Animals and Nature in H.G. Wells Conference Panel

updated: 
Tuesday, September 11, 2012 - 4:39pm
Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment

The abundant and eclectic writings of H.G. Wells offer many opportunities for scholars working in ecocriticism and animal studies to interrogate the attitudes people in the Victorian and modern eras held regarding the non-human world. This panel seeks to explore the many ways in which Wells' diverse corpus engages with various concerns and debates concerning nature in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Romanticism's Flâneurs (NeMLA, March 21-24, Boston; submission deadline 9-30)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 11, 2012 - 4:26pm
Kellie Donovan-Condron/Babson College

Following Benjamin, the flâneur is widely linked with urban spaces of the mid- and late-nineteenth century, but what of those who strolled the streets in the years just before and after the turn of the century? As industrialization began to transform major cities, did these earlier figures have a different relationship with flânerie than their later-century counterparts experienced in more commercialized spaces? Please email 250-500 word abstracts examining Romantic-era flâneurs to Kellie Donovan-Condron (kdonovancondron@babson.edu).

Sister Arts: Ekphrasis and Regional American Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, September 11, 2012 - 4:21pm
Brandi So/North East Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

It might be said that regional literature has a photographic memory. Dialect, landscape, micro-culture and spatiality are drawn with exacting precision. The connection between art and authors, or art and regional literature, may be causal or merely influential. This panel will explore how the term ekphrasis has grown in inclusivity, how regional literature intersects with the sister arts, and what these connections imply. Submit 250 word abstracts to Brandi So, Stony Brook University, Brandi.So@stonybrook.edu

Heroines and Whores: Women in Antiquity (NeMLA, March 21- 24, 2013)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 11, 2012 - 4:04pm
Northeast Modern Language Association

Heroines and Whores: Women in Antiquity
This panel will negotiate the various roles of women in the ancient world (e.g. Greece, Rome, Mesopotamia, etc.) and their importance, as portrayed in archaic texts. We welcome all topics related to the depiction of women in ancient literary or artistic productions (e.g. epic, mythology, tragedy, comedy, vases, etc.).

Deadline: September 30. Please submit your 300 - 500 word abstracts along with your name and affiliation via email to Shelly Jansen, Rochester Institute of Technology, shelly.jansen@gmail.com or shelly.jansen@mail.rit.edu.

Rethinking Empathy (edited volume, 10/1/2012 for proposals) [UPDATE]

updated: 
Tuesday, September 11, 2012 - 3:47pm
Meghan Marie Hammond and Sue J. Kim / NYU and UMass Lowell

Rethinking Empathy: What Literature Can Teach Us About Feeling With Others

Recent years have seen exciting developments on the topic of empathy in a number of fields including neuroscience, social psychology, and philosophy. We invite proposals for essays to be included in a collection on empathy and literature. We believe this volume will serve as an important contribution to a growing field of inquiry. The collection conceives of "literature" broadly to include the graphic novel. We are also open to other narrative media, such as film, television, and online media.

Acts of Asylum - April 4, 2013

updated: 
Tuesday, September 11, 2012 - 3:25pm
University of Pittsburgh Department of Theatre Arts Graduate Student Organization

Acts of Asylum Call for Papers

The Duse Society—the graduate student organization of the University of Pittsburgh's Department of Theatre Arts—is hosting a one-day, interdisciplinary conference, Acts of Asylum. This conference coincides with the opening performance of the University of Pittsburgh Repertory Theatre's original, devised play City of Asylum Onstage. The conference will be held on April 4, 2013.

[UPDATE] CFP: Edited Collection on Dark Fairy Tales in Children's and Young Adult Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, September 11, 2012 - 2:52pm
Tanya Jones, M.Ed. and Joe Abbruscato, MA

Scholarly essays are sought for a collection on the "dark/gothic" fairy tale motif in children's and young adult literature. One of the most popular and long standing traditions in literature for youth, fairy tales have always had elements of fantastical horror, dark motifs, and other Gothic themes built into them. Cannibalism, murders, despair, rape, kidnapping, reincarnations, broken families and many other horrific elements are to be found in these stories. Countless experts insist that their inclusion was, and still is, vital to the growth and maturation of the child reader. The melding of the traditional fairy tale and Gothic literature themes help the reader not only to see the positive aspects of life, but the darker side as well.

Sir William Phips & the Philosophy of History

updated: 
Tuesday, September 11, 2012 - 2:44pm
Joe Conway/ ASECS (Cleveland 2013)

Sir William Phips (1650-1695) was many things: a shepherd, a treasure hunter, a knight, champion of the earliest American paper money experiments, an Indian fighter, the governor of Massachusetts who oversaw the Salem Witch Trials, a pirate who died disgraced and in exile from his native New England, and (not last) a Puritan saint. Though mostly illiterate himself, Phips was written about extensively in the 1690s by his contemporaries Cotton Mather and Daniel Defoe. Later, his memory lived on in one of Hawthorne's earliest historical sketches (1830).

The Phoenix Papers, inaugural edition of an interdisciplinary journal of fandom and media studies

updated: 
Tuesday, September 11, 2012 - 1:48pm
Fandom and Neomedia Studies Association

We are pleased to announce a CFP for articles and reviews for the first edition of our online peer-reviewed journal, The Phoenix Papers. Throughout the year, we welcome reviews of anime, manga, books, movies, video games, TV series, web series, musical albums, performances, and other pop culture media products. We accept submissions throughout the year. However, to be included in our January 2013 edition, you must submit your completed article or review by 1 December 2012. Articles may be on any topic relevant to US or global fandom and/or media studies. In general, reviews should be of items from 2009 onward with precedence given to those from the current year.

Literature and Crime in the Early Nineteenth Century (NeMLA, March 21-24, 2013 - deadline for submissions, Sept 30, 2012)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 11, 2012 - 12:31pm
Northeast Modern Language Association

Literature and Crime in the Early Nineteenth Century

This panel will explore ways in which nineteenth-century British literature published before 1859 engages with issues of crime and criminality. Papers might examine social responses to this literature or situate issues of class and gender in relation to the broader theme of the panel, though a focus on these particular inquiries is not required. Possible texts include, but are not limited to, gothic fiction, Newgate novels, penny 'bloods,' and works by G.W.M. Reynolds. Please send 300-500 word abstracts to Elizabeth Stearns, efporter@syr.edu.

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