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Forms of Innovation: Literature and Technology | Sep 14th 2012 | Deadline: Jul 20th 2012

updated: 
Sunday, June 10, 2012 - 4:21am
full name / name of organization: 
Forms of Innovation: Literature and Technology, University of Durham


Forms of Innovation: Literature and Technology will be a one-day symposium on the interrelation of literary forms and technologies.

For this one-day symposium, we invite speakers to consider how varying forms of creative literary production and reception have responded to innovative technological processes across the centuries.

The symposium will provide a forum for early-career researchers and postgraduates to discuss correspondences and interrelations between literary forms and technologies, particularly those which have been treated as new, revolutionary, unconventional or challenging. Topics for debate might include, but are not limited to:

Poets and Poiesis in Early Modern Drama

updated: 
Sunday, June 10, 2012 - 12:07am
full name / name of organization: 
RSA 2013
contact email: 

We seek papers exploring the use (and misuse!) of the language of making, in plays by Shakespeare, Jonson, and their contemporaries. What are we to make of dramatic representations of poor poets, imperfect actors, and painters that prove inferior to nature? With which other discourses are such metaphors entangled? And how, in particular, might stage representations of art, techne, the craftsman, or the artisan complicate or revise received notions of literary history?

Please submit an abstract (150 words) and brief CV to lkolb@uchicago.edu and mharriso@princeton.edu by June 13, 2012.

Star Power: Celebrity Rule in New Hollywood

updated: 
Saturday, June 9, 2012 - 3:48pm
full name / name of organization: 
Aaron Barlow / New York City College of Technology

I am looking for brief proposals (title and synopsis, 250 to 500 words) for essays that could be included in Star Power: Celebrity Rule in New Hollywood, an upcoming two-volume collection to be published by to Praeger Publishers. The essays will focus on individuals important to contemporary Hollywood. They should be about 7,500 words (plus notes and bibliographical material) and will be due by January 31, 2013 (proposals by August 31, 2012). Contributors will receive a free copy of the set.
Thanks,
--Aaron Barlow
Overview:

CFP TAG 2012: Undermining Lineality: Genealogy, Archaeology, and the Fragmentation of the 'Everyday' Past.

updated: 
Saturday, June 9, 2012 - 5:53am
full name / name of organization: 
Theoretical Archaeology Group

The 34th Annual Meeting of the Theoretical Archaeology Group will be held at the University of Liverpool from the 17th-19th of December 2012. You can view the conference website at: http://www.liv.ac.uk/sace/livetag/index.htm

Session Title:

Undermining Lineality: Genealogy, Archaeology, and the Fragmentation of the 'Everyday' Past.

Gender and Genre: Exploring Intersections in Women's Life-Writing (Deadline: Sept. 30th)

updated: 
Friday, June 8, 2012 - 5:42pm
full name / name of organization: 
Rachel N. Spear, Vice President of NeMLA’s WGS Caucus
contact email: 

Call for Papers

Gender and Genre: Exploring Intersections in Women's Life-Writing

44th Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
March 21-24, 2013
Boston, Massachusetts
Host Institution: Tufts University

Gender and Genre: Exploring Intersections in Women's Life-Writing

UPDATE: Bollywood and the Crises of Representation: Terrorism, Us, Them, and 9/11

updated: 
Friday, June 8, 2012 - 4:12pm
full name / name of organization: 
South Asian Cinema-Victoria College
contact email: 

Popular Indian cinema has witnessed a steady rise in the production of movies related to terrorism and threat to national security since 2001. While critically and aesthetically examining the perpetual threats that India lives under, these movies have successfully captured the jingoistic fervor and pride that have repeatedly trumped such adversity. In addition, Bollywood's focus has interestingly shifted from cross-border terrorism to the global terrorism revolving around America and her allies, their insurgencies in the Middle East and the subsequent tremors felt everywhere, especially by Indian expatriates.

"Infamous Form" (EC/ASECS 11/1-11/3, Baltimore)

updated: 
Friday, June 8, 2012 - 4:01pm
full name / name of organization: 
East Central/ American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies

Samuel Johnson may have been wrong about the staying power of Tristram Shandy, but it's nevertheless clear that some of the eighteenth century's oddest works didn't "do long." Prompted by renewed attention to these oddities, this panel seeks papers that theorize the experimental novel of eighteenth-century Britain. Must the experimental novel be defined against the emergent realist novel? What texts might comprise the experimental canon? What contemporary discourses (scientific? philosophical? commercial? political?) might help us to understand these forms? (Papers that reject the term "experimental novel" with disgust also welcome!)

Materiality of Devotion and Piety: The Middle Ages and Beyond

updated: 
Friday, June 8, 2012 - 3:33pm
full name / name of organization: 
Purdue University/ Indiana Medieval Graduate Consortium
contact email: 

"The hooly blisful martyr for to seke," is the alleged goal for the pilgrimage that structures Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. What remains under-discussed is the actual goal of the Canterbury pilgrimage, or any other medieval pilgrimage: the pilgrims seek not "the hooly blissful martyr" himself, but things related to him—hair shirt, body parts, or any other object related to the saint and available for view. Devotion in the Middle Ages (Christian and non-Christian) took a tangible, material form that was considered equally important as the saints, deity, or feelings of devotion itself. Such material manifestations of devotion continued to evolve throughout the Middle Ages and beyond.

Aberrant Enlightenment Ecopoetics (abstracts due 9/1)

updated: 
Friday, June 8, 2012 - 2:41pm
full name / name of organization: 
Conference on Ecopoetics, UC Berkeley, Feb. 22-24, 2013
contact email: 

This panel explores ecopoetics in the long eighteenth-century. The age of Enlightenment tends to be cast as a time when natural-historical discourses attempted to order and categorize the natural world in its entirety. Conquest generated imperatives to reduce, collect, classify, and master the natural world; natural sciences, in turn, propelled conquest. As natural history shaded into anthropology at mid-century, theories of racial essence, in support of colonial projects, became more firm.

UPDATE "worth a thousand words": at the intersections of literature and the visua arts, 24-26 October 2012

updated: 
Friday, June 8, 2012 - 11:47am
full name / name of organization: 
Radboud University Nijmegen (the Netherlands)


http://www.ru.nl/hlcs/worthathousandwords

Proposals deadline: 1 July 2012

Confirmed plenary speakers: Elena Gualtieri (University of Groningen), Mette Gieskes (Radboud University Nijmegen)

Clement Greenberg once famously said, "photography is closer today to literature than it is to the other graphic arts". Yet what makes photography so close to literature? And what about the interactions between literature and other visual arts? Are some combinations indeed more productive than others? And what happens when literature and the visual arts meet?

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