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The Cognitive Turn in Contemporary American Literature (NEMLA 2013)

updated: 
Monday, May 21, 2012 - 1:20pm
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association
contact email: 

This panel will explore the 'cognitive turn' in literary studies as it emerges in contemporary American fiction and non-fiction. Since George H. W. Bush declared the 1990's the "decade of the brain," there has been a surge of cross-disciplinary work done at the site of cognitive studies, neuroscience and the humanities. For example, scholars such as Lisa Zunshine and Paul John Eakin have called for literary methodologies that account for cognition and perception in their analyses. Additionally, a growing number of fiction and non-fiction texts use cognitive studies and neuroscientific research to upend generic constraints, as well as challenge assumptions about how we construct, perceive, and describe the world and ourselves within it.

CFP: Doctor Who Fan Phenomena [15 AUG]

updated: 
Monday, May 21, 2012 - 12:57pm
full name / name of organization: 
Paul Booth
contact email: 

Pardons for cross-posting!

CFP: Doctor Who: Fan Phenomena (Intellect)

Now accepting abstracts for consideration for the new Doctor Who (Fan Phenomena) title from Intellect Press. This will be part of the second series of Fan Phenomena books, which aim to explore and decode the fascination we have with what constitutes an iconic or cultish phenomenon and how a particular person, TV show or film character/film infiltrates their way into the public consciousness.

CFP: Networked Humanities: From Within and Without the University

updated: 
Monday, May 21, 2012 - 12:53pm
full name / name of organization: 
Writing, Rhetoric, and Digital Media (University of Kentucky)
contact email: 

Networked Humanities: From Within and Without the University
A Digital Humanities Symposium
February 15-16, 2013
The University of Kentucky
Writing, Rhetoric, and Digital Media Program

Keynote Speakers:
Kathleen Stewart, Professor of Anthropology, University of Texas

Malcolm McCullough, Professor of Architecture, University of Michigan

Luvah Volume 1 No. 2 (Deadline June 1st 2012)

updated: 
Monday, May 21, 2012 - 12:47pm
full name / name of organization: 
Luvah: Journal of the Creative Imagination
contact email: 

The editorial board of Luvah ( http://mimes.is ) is seeking strong submissions for the forthcoming August issue. We are an interdisciplinary journal focused on the interplay of religion, philosophy, and politics in the late-capitalist spiritual vacuum. Our journal publishes critical texts, translations, and creative writing, such as poetry. If you are interested in submitting a paper or proposal, please contact the editor at editor@mimes.is.

Call for chapters: A book on King of the Hill (6/18/2012)

updated: 
Monday, May 21, 2012 - 11:44am
full name / name of organization: 
Katie Salzmann / Texas State University-San Marcos
contact email: 

McFarland & Company has expressed sincere interest in publishing this edited collection of essays on the animated sitcom, King of the Hill. The show, co-created by Mike Judge and Greg Daniels, ran for thirteen seasons on FOX from 1997-2010, and it continues to air in syndication. Described as "one of television's richest depictions of family life," King of the Hill offers a wide range of themes for exploration.

[UPDATE] OWING A DEBT TO ILLUSTRATION

updated: 
Monday, May 21, 2012 - 10:59am
full name / name of organization: 
MMLA 2012 convention, Cincinnati, Nov. 8 - 11; section on Illustrated Texts
contact email: 

Deadline extended through June 4th:

Paper proposals are sought for a panel presentation on Illustrated Texts, in keeping with the MMLA 2012 conference theme of "Debt."

At least since Mark Twain left it to E. W. Kemble to depict the hero of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, authors and their texts have owed a debt to illustration. At least since James Agee accompanied Walker Evans to photograph Depression-era Alabama sharecroppers, authors have left it to illustrators to depict indebtedness in literary illustrations. Writers have sometimes been indebted to illustrators, while writers and illustrators have sometimes conspired, on the literary market, to depict economic debt on the open market. .

The Permissive Archive, abstracts 31 July, conference 9 November 2012

updated: 
Monday, May 21, 2012 - 9:28am
full name / name of organization: 
Centre for Editing Lives and Letters, Queen Mary, University of London

For ten years, the Centre for Editing Lives and Letters (CELL) has pioneered original archival research that illuminates the past for the benefit of the modern research community, and beyond. To celebrate this anniversary, on 9 November 2012 we will be holding a conference examining the future of the 'Permissive Archive'.

The scope of archival history is broad, and this conference seeks presentations from a wide range of work which opens up archives - not only by bringing to light objects and texts that have lain hidden, but by demystifying and demonstrating the skills needed to make new histories. Too long associated with settled dust, archival research will be championed as engaged and engaging: a rigorous but permissive field.

The Literary Interventions of the Digital Humanities: A Pecha Kucha Roundtable (NEMLA)

updated: 
Monday, May 21, 2012 - 12:54am
full name / name of organization: 
Ryan Cordell, Digital Americanist Society
contact email: 

Abstract:
The Digital Americanist Society seeks speakers who will articulate a clear, interpretive intervention that digital scholarship has made (or could make) in their areas of study. Our goal will not be to describe digital projects, but instead to demonstrate how those projects advance, supplement, or disrupt the scholarly conversations of our respective literary subfields. We encourage "non-DH" scholars whose work has benefited from DH scholarship to contribute. Submit abstracts to Ryan Cordell, Northeastern University, rccordell@gmail.com, by September 30, 2012.

CFP New Wave Iranian Cinema

updated: 
Monday, May 21, 2012 - 12:39am
full name / name of organization: 
Persian Film Festival and Sydney Society for Literature and Aesthetics

Iranian New Wave Cinema – Call for papers

The Persian International Film Festival (Australia) and The Sydney Society for Literature and Aesthetics are proud to announce a call out for articles for a special edition of The Journal for the Sydney Society for Literature and Aesthetics on Iranian New Wave Cinema.
Guest editors are Dr. Omid Tofighian and festival co-director Sanaz Fotouhi.

Deadline for abstracts is 1st of July, 2012.

Brawls, Bawds and Beer: The Early Modern Alehouse and Tavern

updated: 
Sunday, May 20, 2012 - 7:40pm
full name / name of organization: 
Emily Sloan-Pace / RSA
contact email: 

The early modern tavern was often conceived of as a place of misrule, a place of violence, prostitution, theft and deceit. This was a space that inspired great social anxiety, as much a result of the inebriating product it served as for the unchecked gossip it facilitated among female patrons. Alewives in particular were figures of great cultural resonance, appearing regularly (and in a negative light) in art and literature. This space and the people who ran it were socially necessary but often viewed with disdain and suspicion, operating in a liminal space even as they provide a vital nutritive function.

Returning to Oz: The Afterlife of Dorothy

updated: 
Sunday, May 20, 2012 - 7:31pm
full name / name of organization: 
Hic Dragones

Papers are sought for a one-day conference in Manchester on representations and interpretations of Dorothy and Oz in popular culture. This conference seeks to address the perennial popularity of L. Frank Baum's creations, and to explore their most recent incarnations.

Possible themes may include (but are not limited to):
• Film, TV and animated adaptations
• Sequels and prequels (other than Baum's series); translations, editions and revisions
• Music and musicals
• Kitsch
• 'Friends of Dorothy' and gay culture
• MGM and Judy Garland
• Graphic novels and visual art
• Merchandise, memorabilia and ephemera

"Food and Film" at bienniel Film and History Conference, 26-30 Sept. 2012, Milwaukee, WI

updated: 
Sunday, May 20, 2012 - 4:59pm
full name / name of organization: 
Tom Hertweck, University of Nevada, Reno
contact email: 

CALL FOR PAPERS
Food of the Gods: The Mythic Poetics of Food, Drink, and Eating in Film and Television
An area of multiple panels for the biennial Film and History Conference on "Film and Myth"
26-30 September 2012
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
www.filmandhistory.org
First Round Deadline: 1 June 2012

The Artemis Archetype in Fiction, Film, and Television: NeMLA Mar. 21-24, 2013, Boston

updated: 
Sunday, May 20, 2012 - 3:09pm
full name / name of organization: 
Susan Redington Bobby/NeMLA

Peggy Orenstein's "Cinderella Ate My Daughter" examines the ubiquitous Disney Princesses and their stranglehold on girl culture. Since 2000, when an executive altered the landscape of marketing strategies and revenue by creating the 'Princess' product line, the Disney Princesses have become role models for the majority of girls and young women. As Orenstein sums up, '…princesses avoid female bonding. Their goals are to be saved by a prince, get married…and be taken care of for the rest of their lives. Their value derives largely from their appearance.' In the face of such feminine disempowerment, is there an antidote to the plague of passive princesses dominating girl culture? The answer may lie in myth, through the Artemis archetype.

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