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Voice and Modernist Spectacle (Proposed panel for MSA 14, Las Vegas, Oct. 18–21, 2012)

updated: 
Friday, March 16, 2012 - 2:11pm
Sara Bryant

CFP: Proposed panel on Voice and Modernist Spectacle
MSA 14, Las Vegas (Oct. 18–21, 2012)

Visuality and visibility are central to definitions of spectacle; however, spectacles are rarely silent or voiceless. This panel will consider modernist spectacles wherein voice plays a primary or significant role, whether in concert with or separate from the visual and other senses.

Possible topics might include, but aren't limited to:

—Modern sound technologies and technologized voice.
—The modernist sensorium; modernism or modernity and the senses.
—Embodied and/or disembodied voice in film or theater.
—Voice and political spectacle.
—Spectacles of failure: faltering or weakened voice, "choking," blundering.

Undergraduate Research in Literary and Cultural Studies

updated: 
Friday, March 16, 2012 - 11:29am
Constellations-Undergraduate Journal of Literary and Cultural Studies

Call for Papers

Constellations is a new journal of undergraduate research in literary and cultural studies, produced in the Department of English & Comparative Literary Studies at the University of Warwick. Our first issue is available here:

www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/english/constellations

The journal aims to provide a forum for critical work by undergraduates demonstrating the possibilities of the field. We welcome diverse and provocative approaches to a wide range of literary-cultural topics.

[UPDATE] Modernist Lives, Precarious Lives (MSA 14, October 18th-21st, Las Vegas)

updated: 
Friday, March 16, 2012 - 10:03am
Walt Hunter/ University of Virginia

Although much recent criticism in modernist studies has focused on the everyday and the ordinary, this panel proposes instead to look at the precarious. The term precarity has been heard more and more frequently in the disciplines of political philosophy, economics, anthropology, and critical theory, but it has only begun to make its way into literary studies. Current discussions of precarity are shaped by the work of Paulo Virno, who describes it as "the chronic instability of forms of life," and by Judith Butler, who conceives of precarity as a shared vulnerability on the basis of which we might found a tentative community.

[UPDATE] 13-14 December 2012 The 20th METU British Novelists Conference: Salman Rushdie and His Work

updated: 
Friday, March 16, 2012 - 10:02am
The 20th METU British Novelists Conference: Salman Rushdie and His Work

The 20th METU British Novelists Conference: Salman Rushdie and His Work

13-14 December 2012
Ankara, Turkey

Website: http://www.britishnovelists.metu.edu.tr
Contact name: Elif Öztabak-Avcı (elifo@metu.edu.tr)

The Department of Foreign Language Education at Middle East Technical University invites abstracts for its 20th METU British Novelists Conference: Salman Rushdie and His Work. Abstracts (about 250 words) for 20-minute presentations on any aspect of Salman Rushdie's work will be considered. Selected papers will be published in the conference proceedings.

Modernist Lives, Precarious Lives

updated: 
Friday, March 16, 2012 - 10:01am
Walt Hunter/ University of Virginia

Although much recent criticism in modernist studies has focused on the everyday and the ordinary, this panel proposes instead to look at the precarious. The term precarity has been heard more and more frequently in the disciplines of political philosophy, economics, anthropology, and critical theory, but it has only begun to make its way into literary studies. Current discussions of precarity are shaped by the work of Paulo Virno, who describes it as "the chronic instability of forms of life," and by Judith Butler, who conceives of precarity as a shared vulnerability on the basis of which we might found a tentative community.

Closes soon: Edited Collection on Sherlock Holmes Adaptations

updated: 
Friday, March 16, 2012 - 8:11am
Mareike Jenner, Stephanie Jones, Nia Edwards-Behi, Department of Theatre, Film and Television Studies, Aberystwyth University

Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories have recently gained new popularity through a variety of adaptations and re-interpretations in a broad variety of media forms. This edited collection will focus on three ways to access these texts: Fan and audience activity, adaptations throughout history and their political and ideological contextualization, and intertextual influences. We welcome submissions for articles of 200 word abstracts on adaptations of Sherlock Holmes. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

Contemporary Spectacles of the Modern (MSA 14 - October 18-21, 2012)

updated: 
Friday, March 16, 2012 - 8:11am
Chris Coffman / University of Alaska Fairbanks

What happens when modernist cultural products return in or persist into the present? For a proposed panel for the 14th annual conference of the Modernist Studies Association in Las Vegas (October 18-21, 2012), I seek papers from a broad range of methodological and disciplinary perspectives on "contemporary spectacles of the modern." Possible topics may include, but are not limited to: contemporary productions of avant-garde and modernist performances; contemporary rewritings of modernist texts for performance; contemporary celebrations of or retrospectives of the work of modernist writers or visual artists; or modernist landmarks preserved and functioning as tourist spectacles.

[UPDATE] - Reconfiguring Authorship'

updated: 
Friday, March 16, 2012 - 6:42am
Research on Authorship as Performance (RAP) project, English Studies, Ghent University

Thursday, November 15-Sunday, November 18, 2012
Ghent University, Belgium

The 'Research on Authorship as Performance' project at Ghent University invites proposals for 20-minute papers as well as for complete panels, for a conference on the theme of 'Reconfiguring Authorship'. This three-day conference will explore facets of authorship in the Anglophone world from the Middle Ages to the present; confirmed keynote speakers include Richard Wilson (Cardiff), Margaret Ezell (Texas A&M), Dame Gillian Beer (Cambridge), and Paul St Amour (Pennsylvania).

Call for Abstracts (April 23, 2012) for CRITICAL INSIGHTS: LITERATURE OF PROTEST AND LIBERATION, a collection of scholarly essay

updated: 
Thursday, March 15, 2012 - 10:11pm
Kimberly Drake/Scripps College

The editor of the book Critical Insights: Literature of Protest and Liberation, a collection of scholarly essays (under contract with Salem Press/EBSCO) seeks contributions on any aspect of protest literature (defined as fiction, poetry, autobiography, creative nonfiction, drama, and song lyrics written about and/or by any socially, politically, and/or economically marginalized group of people in any country). The book will be composed of 13 original essays written for an audience of advanced high school and undergraduate college students.

After the Storm: Collection of Stories, Creative Works, and Art 07/01/2012

updated: 
Thursday, March 15, 2012 - 9:35pm
After the Storm

In today's age, bullying has taken a hold of our culture and driven people of all ages, sexes, sexualities, and ethnicities to take drastic actions to make it stop. Whether these actions were aimed at themselves or others, the after effects have always been devastating. In order to add to the movement to put an end to these struggles and encourage teens or others at risk that it can get better if they hold out, we have decided to compile a collection of nonfiction essays, stories, art, and other works to contribute to the elimination of LBGTQIA suicide and other harmful behavior. This compilation will then be formatted into a book to further the message that things can change and that individual's struggling are not the only ones who have suffered.

Winter 2012 Issue: Writing Center Theory and Practice

updated: 
Thursday, March 15, 2012 - 8:26pm
Academic Exchange Quarterly

The Winter 2012 Issue of Academic Exchange Quarterly is now accepting submissions for its special section on Writing Center Theory and Practice. Articles may explore issues of theory, practice, and experience in writing center work, including qualitative and empirical studies and discussions of pedagogy.

Articles may also consider the following: How writing center professionals cope with change and the eventuality of needing to expand their efforts in response to new economic and demographic challenges. Furthermore, as we move towards increasingly viral and technologically dependent learning communities, how can these efforts help meet the evolving demands of our students?

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