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Philadelphia Trans Health Conference Panels -- Call for Participants

updated: 
Thursday, December 22, 2011 - 11:14pm
Joelle Ruby Ryan

Call for Participation on Panels at the Philadelphia Trans Health Conference

Emailed proposals due to me by Thursday, January 12, 2012. I will submit full panel proposals for the conference by the due date of 1/15/12.

Conference Dates: May 31 – June 2, 2012 @ the Philadelphia Convention Center

#1: Trans Fats: A Panel Discussion on Weight Diversity, Fatphobia and Gender Expression

Women Writing Women in the Eighteenth Century - Collection of Essays, 1/23/2012

updated: 
Thursday, December 22, 2011 - 6:24pm
Kristine Jennings

The rise of the middle class in Europe in the eighteenth century, culminating in the French Revolution, resulted in a bourgeois ideology that dominated in the nineteenth century and beyond. Men and women became clearly defined in terms of the widening distinction between public and private spaces in an increasingly commercialized society, and the former feudal hierarchy was largely replaced by a hierarchy based on sex/gender. The emerging economic division of "home" and "world" also translated into mental, emotional, and sexual differences: men became aligned with activity and rationality, their function was defined as cultural, whereas women were seen as passive and emotional and were defined through marriage and family.

CFP: Humanities at the Limit Submissions due February 1, 2012

updated: 
Thursday, December 22, 2011 - 2:43pm
Department of Romance Languages and Literatures Graduate Student Association

In recent years, the humanities have been facing a crisis guided by corporate measures taking place in universities across the globe. The changes occurring in the university demand many academic departments to justify their relevance and applicability in our world today. We face a need to redefine what the humanities are in the twenty-first century and more specifically the role of the modern language and literature departments in the new humanities.

Scholars across disciplines have begun to engage in interdisciplinary conversations that address the current state and the future of the humanities. By participating in this debate, we aim to redefine our place inside and outside of the university.

Race, History, and National Belonging in American Women's Literature

updated: 
Thursday, December 22, 2011 - 2:06pm
Society for the Study of American Women Writers

In her novel Hagar's Daughter, African American feminist Pauline Elizabeth Hopkins imagines her black female characters as looking back to and claiming cross-racial, gendered legacies in the process of forming their own identities, from Hagar Sargeant's dreaming of white colonial dames to Venus Johnson's militant transvestism. In The House of Mirth, Edith Wharton draws from the exegetical grouping of Judaism, femininity, and sexuality in the persons of Simon Rosedale and Lily Bart to reexamine Old New York's puritanical insistence upon its citizens' moral and physical inviolability.

20th-Century Women's Utopian and Dystopian Fiction: abstracts by June 15, 2012, essays by Sept. 15, 2012

updated: 
Thursday, December 22, 2011 - 1:33pm
Dr. Sharon Wilson

20th-Century Women's Utopian and Dystopian Fiction: abstracts by June 15, 2012, essays by Sept. 15, 2012

How utopian and/or dystopian fiction creates new worlds, establishes genre, and critiques gender roles, traditions, and values; e.g. Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Monique Wittig, Marge Piercy, Doris Lessing, Margaret Atwood. c.v and 500 word abstracts to sharon.wilson@unco.edu.

20-30 page essays by Sept. 15, 2012 for possible publication by Cambridge Fellows Press. Writers around the world may be considered, but texts must be available in English and essays must be in English.

ESSE Conference, Istanbul, 4-8 September 2012

updated: 
Thursday, December 22, 2011 - 11:21am
The European Society for the Study of English

ESSE Conference, Istanbul 4-8 September 2012
Post-9/11 Cultures of Terror in South-East Asian Literature and Film

[Extended Deadline] Endless forms most beautiful: Science in 19th C Am Lit: 1/9/12

updated: 
Thursday, December 22, 2011 - 10:55am
American Literature Association 2012

Endless forms most beautiful: Science in 19th Century American Literature

I would like to propose a panel of papers that explores the role of science (rather than technology) in 19th century American literature for the 23rd Annual American Literature Association Conference in San Francisco, CA.

In/coherence: expression, translation, violence April 21-22, 2012

updated: 
Thursday, December 22, 2011 - 1:16am
University of Victoria

In/coherence: expression, translation, violence
Cultural Social and Political Thought Workshop
University of Victoria: April 21-22, 2012

The Cultural, Social, and Political Thought program at the University of Victoria is pleased to announce a call for papers and projects for our annual graduate conference on April 21-22, 2012. The title of this year's conference is in/coherence: expression, translation, violence. Thematic workshops will feature keynote speakers and student submissions (papers, performances, art pieces). This interdisciplinary conference seeks to engage in/coherence in social, cultural and political discourses, especially with respect to contemporary events.

Innovations and Anxieties - Saturday, March 31, 2012

updated: 
Wednesday, December 21, 2011 - 9:30pm
Graduate Program in English at the University of Rhode Island (Kingston, RI)

Innovations and Anxieties
Saturday, March 31, 2012
A graduate conference hosted by the Graduate Program in English at the University of Rhode Island (Kingston, RI)

Asian Culture(s) and Globalization / special issue

updated: 
Wednesday, December 21, 2011 - 5:10pm
Professor I-Chun Wang

Asian Culture(s) and Globalization
Papers are invited for publication in a special issue entitled "Asian Culture(s) and Globalization" -- edited by I-Chun Wang (National Sun Yat-sen U) -- of CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture
http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/clcweb
(ISSN 1481-4374). A humanities and social sciences quarterly published since 1999 by Purdue University Press, the journal is peer-reviewed, in full-text, in open-access, and ISI-AHCI, MLA, Scopus, etc., indexed.

Asian Culture(s) and Globalization / special issue

updated: 
Wednesday, December 21, 2011 - 5:07pm
I-Chun Wang

Asian Culture(s) and Globalization
Papers are invited for publication in a special issue entitled "Asian Culture(s) and Globalization" -- edited by I-Chun Wang (National Sun Yat-sen U) -- of CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture
http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/clcweb
(ISSN 1481-4374). A humanities and social sciences quarterly published since 1999 by Purdue University Press, the journal is peer-reviewed, in full-text, in open-access, and ISI-AHCI, MLA, Scopus, etc., indexed.

CFP ebook manuscripts

updated: 
Wednesday, December 21, 2011 - 3:58pm
Shook Foil Books

Shook Foil Books, a team of experienced pastors, writers, and scholars committed to publishing thoughtful ebooks for the church and academy, seeks submissions of works that engage matters of Christian faith from a variety of perspectives and disciplines. We are especially interested in new and emerging scholars who envision their writing as kingdom work and want to start conversations that challenge and edify church communities and those who lead them. Submissions of monographs, collections of sermons, works of fiction and poetry are all welcome.

Violence: In Theory and Practice March 23-25, 2012

updated: 
Wednesday, December 21, 2011 - 3:33pm
The Seventh Annual University of Ottawa English Graduate Conference

VIOLENCE
In Theory and Practice
March 23-25, 2012

The Seventh Annual University of Ottawa English Graduate Conference
Keynote Speaker: Smaro Kamboureli, University of Guelph

"Violence commands both literature and life, and violence is often crude and distorted." – Ellen Glasgow

Violence is an ever-present phenomenon in literary texts. From Homer's graphic descriptions of infantry combat in the Iliad, to Wilfred Owen's haunting portrayal of the war-torn fields of Europe, to Edith Wharton's subtle critique of Old New York as a place of ruthless social warfare, representations of violence powerfully call our attention to questions of authority, agency and power.

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