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Picturing Paradise in 19th Century British and North American Art: Past, Lost, Regained

updated: 
Sunday, December 4, 2016 - 11:56pm
Association of Scholars of Christianity in the History of Art
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, February 1, 2017

CALL FOR PAPER PROPOSALS

 

Picturing Paradise in 19th Century British and North American Art: Past, Lost, Regained

A Special Issue of Religion and the Arts edited by Rachel Smith and James Romaine

 

PROPOSALS DUE: February 1, 2017

 

Essays, Reviews, Interviews and Creative Work in Literature and Cinema Wanted

updated: 
Friday, December 2, 2016 - 10:06am
Anna Faktorovich / Anaphora, PLJ and CCR
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, December 15, 2016

Cinematic Codes Review and the Pennsylvania Literary Journal are in need of more scholarly and creative submission for their upcoming winter issues.

CCR, https://anaphoraliterary.com/journals/ccr, focuses on all visual and auditory arts, including popular and artistic films, festivals, fine arts, and music. Reviews of and interviews with recent and established artists are welcome as well as critical essays of all sizes.

Reworking Walter Scott

updated: 
Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 10:26am
Daniel Cook / University of Dundee
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 16, 2016

Reworking Walter Scott
31st March – 2nd April 2017, University of Dundee
Abstracts due: 16th December 2016

Plenary Speaker: Professor Alison Lumsden

“Dialogues in Scottish Studies: The work of Cairns Craig” (Panel)

updated: 
Friday, November 25, 2016 - 6:39am
2nd World Congress of Scottish Literatures June 21-25, 2017; Vancouver, BC
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, January 1, 2017

Call for Papers - Panel on the Work of Cairns Craig

2nd World Congress of Scottish Literatures

June 21-25, 2017 (Vancouver, BC)

 

Medicine and Mystery: The Dark Side of Science in Victorian Fiction - Victorian Popular Fiction Association Study Day

updated: 
Monday, November 21, 2016 - 10:17am
National University of Ireland Galway
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, March 17, 2017

Medicine and Mystery

The Dark Side of Science in Victorian Fiction

A Victorian Popular Fiction Association – NUI Galway Study Day

8th June 2017 National University of Ireland, Galway

Key-note speakers

Ms Sarah Wise, Author

Mr Alexander Black, NUI Galway - The Early Years of Anatomy in Galway

Exhibition – “Medicine and Mystery in C19th Galway”, Curated by Anna Gasperini and Paul Rooney

Midwestern Conference on Literature, Language, and Media (MCLLM)

updated: 
Monday, November 21, 2016 - 10:20am
Northern Illinois University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 27, 2017

CALL FOR PAPERS: MCLLM

Conference Date: April 7-8, 2017

Deadline for Proposals: January 27, 2017

Theme: “Altered States, Times, Perspectives”

Hakluyt Society Essay Prize (travel writing)

updated: 
Monday, November 21, 2016 - 10:21am
Hakluyt Society
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 30, 2016

The Hakluyt Society

 

Publisher since 1846 of Historical Voyages and Travels

  

Hakluyt Society Essay Prize

The Hakluyt Society awards an annual essay prize (or more than one, if the judges so decide) of up to a total of £750. The prize or prizes for 2017 will be presented, if possible, at the Hakluyt Society’s Annual General Meeting in London in June 2017. Winners will also receive a one-year membership of the Hakluyt Society. The Society hopes that the winning essay will be published, either in the Society’s online journal or in a recognised academic journal.

Animals in Detective Fiction

updated: 
Wednesday, November 16, 2016 - 10:05am
Palgrave Studies in Animals and Literature
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, March 31, 2017

Since its origins in the mid nineteenth century, detective fiction has been populated by a huge array of beasts. If the genre begins, as is widely supposed (though not without some debate), with Edgar Allen Poe’s ‘Murders in the Rue Morgue’ (1841), then detective fiction’s very first culprit is an animal. Such beastly instances of criminal violence are among the genre’s most recurrent figurings of the non-human. Accordingly, like Poe’s frenzied ourang-outang on the spree in Paris, Arthur Conan Doyle’s Hound of the Baskervilles (1902) identifies a murderous aggression as part-and-parcel of animal nature. Detective fiction accommodates gentler and more law-abiding creatures too, however.

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