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VSAWC/VISAWUS 2017: Victorian Education

updated: 
Monday, August 22, 2016 - 10:26am
Victorian Studies Association of Western Canada/Victorian Interdisciplinary Studies Association of the Western United States
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 26, 2016

CFP for VSAWC / VISAWUS 2017 Joint Conference: “Victorian Education”

Vancouver, British Columbia

28-29 April 2017 & Publication Workshop 27 & 30 April 2017

 

NCSA 2017: "Jane Austen & Memory"

updated: 
Monday, August 22, 2016 - 10:24am
John Bugg / Fordham University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

JANE AUSTEN & MEMORY

 

The Motto (from Mansfield Park):

       Fanny: “If any one faculty of our nature may be called more wonderful than the rest, I do think it is memory. There seems something more speakingly incomprehensible in the powers, the failures, the inequalities of memory, than in any other of our intelligences. The memory is sometimes so retentive, so serviceable, so obedient – at others, so bewildered and so weak – and at others again, so tyrannic, so beyond controul! – We are to be sure a miracle every way – but our powers of recollecting and of forgetting, do seem peculiarly past finding out.”

George Egerton and the fin de siècle

updated: 
Monday, August 22, 2016 - 10:22am
Loughborough University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2016

George Egerton and the fin de siècle

A two-day conference organised by the Modern & Contemporary Research Group at Loughborough University

Keynote speaker:

Professor Margaret D. Stetz (University of Delaware)

Friday 7 – Saturday 8 April 2017

 

Masculinity in Women’s Literature

updated: 
Monday, August 22, 2016 - 10:12am
Susmita Roye
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

This panel is for NeMLA's annual convention at Baltimore from 23-26 March, 2017.

In Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, Mr. Bennett can never match the resourcefulness of his wife in her attempts to settle their five daughters in life; Edgar Linton in Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights is a caricature of manliness; in Elizabeth Gaskell’s Wives and Daughters, an only daughter, Molly Gibson, proves to be a better child to her father than a son, Osborne Hamley, who fails his parents; George Eliot’s The Mill on the Floss presents Maggie Tulliver as a far stronger, braver and tougher character than her brother Tom.

Coldnoon Cities London – Lahore – Cairo – Calcutta (Call for Submissions) IInd Round of Call for Submissions

updated: 
Saturday, August 20, 2016 - 1:10am
Coldnoon: Travel Poetics (International Journal of Travel Writing)
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 20, 2016

 Mapping the Metropolis: Coldnoon CitiesLondon – Lahore – Cairo – Calcutta (Call for Submissions)

 

To read the concept note and call for submissions, please visit: http://coldnoon.com/mapping-the-metropolis-london-lahore-cairo-calcutta/

 

Coldnoon: Travel Poetics (International Journal of Travel Writing): Call for Submissions

updated: 
Saturday, August 20, 2016 - 1:09am
Coldnoon: Travel Poetics (International Journal of Travel Writing)
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Coldnoon: Travel Poetics (International Journal of Travel Writing) www.coldnoon.com

invites writings (prose/nonfiction/research/opinions/poetry/travelogues) on travel/space/geography/landscapes/cities/urbanism etc.

 

Submissions in this category would only be for our exlcusive online segments, Diaries and Dialogues. These are published daily. if you wish to consider submitting for the journal please follow the call for submissions here: coldnoon.com/mapping-the-metropolis-london-lahore-cairo-calcutta/.

Submissions are invited in two categories:

The American Romance in 2016

updated: 
Monday, August 15, 2016 - 1:33pm
Society of Early Americanists (SEA)
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, August 30, 2016

his panel addresses the American romance in light of recent developments in early American studies. While many Britishists accepted the ascendancy of the anglophone novel, others challenged this teleology, and the transatlantic turn has invited us to consider whether the romance genre survived the New World. The existence of a colonial romance would challenge the “birth” of the American genre in the wake of Scott’s Ivanhoe (1819), and revising that literary history could in turn broaden American romance beyond a hoary pro-slavery ideology. Post-WWII critics arguing for an American romance tradition often cite Hawthorne’s own christening of his novels as “romances” as a key piece of evidence.

North Wind: A Journal of George MacDonald Studies

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 4:00pm
North Wind: A Journal of George MacDonald Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 31, 2016

North Wind: A Journal of George MacDonald Studies

 

North Wind, the journal devoted to the works of George MacDonald, is seeking articles for its 2016 edition.  Articles are welcome on all aspects of MacDonald: his fairy tales, fantasies, novels, poetry, and sermons.  The journal is also seeking shorter “notes and queries” and “connections” that focus on issues related to MacDonald.

 

Acting Age in the Long Eighteenth Century

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 3:46pm
NEMLA 2017
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Recent work in performance studies have trenchantly analyzed constructs of identity, gender, and race in the Long Eighteenth Century. In Rival Queens, for example, Felicity Nussbaum explores how actresses of the eighteenth century embodied and challenged femininity through their roles on and off the stage, roles that blended together in the mind of a public audience. But enlightening performance studies such as Nussbaum's do not often, however, account for age. Age cuts across gender, race, and class.

Fashioning the Unconventional Victorian: Conduct, Costume, Coiffure

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 3:39pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) 2017/Baltimore
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Despite a rich scholarship on Victorian dress culture, the idiosyncratic in Victorian costume often remains marginal in the criticism. This panel examines how fashion – original, unusual, peculiar, or even outlandish – preoccupied the Victorian cultural imagination. Papers might investigate eccentric fashion’s role in specific genres; its portrayal in the Victorian periodic press, advertising, or conduct manuals; the bachelor girl’s or the dandy’s nonconformity in attire; dress as gender or status markers; how costume determines, camouflages, or liberates; the fin-de-siècle aesthete’s couture; ways the outré became a normatively modish for the middle-class Victorian consumer.

REMINDER - RSAA 2017, Transporting Romanticism: Mediation and Mobility

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 3:29pm
Romantic Studies Association of Australasia (RSAA)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 20, 2016

 

RSAA 2017: Transporting Romanticism: Mediation and Mobility
16-18 February 2017
Wellington, New Zealand
Co-hosted by Massey University and Victoria University of Wellington

Proposals due: 20 August 2016

"Interdisciplinary Dickens" -- 22nd Annual Dickens Society Symposium

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 3:23pm
Co-Sponsored by the Dickens Society and The Center for Interdisciplinary Teaching & Learning at CGS, Boston University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Call for Papers for the 22nd Annual Dickens Society Symposium
Theme: “Interdisciplinary Dickens”
July 14-16, 2017, College of General Studies, Boston University

Co-Sponsored by the Dickens Society and The Center for Interdisciplinary Teaching & Learning at CGS, Boston University

NeMLA 2017: Literary Form and its Limit: Marxism, Poststructuralism, and Description

updated: 
Friday, August 5, 2016 - 9:34pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) 2017
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

The legacies of both Marxism and poststructuralism have loomed large in literary studies in recent years. The ongoing publication of the late seminars of both Foucault and Derrida, as well as the long awaited translation of Althusser’s On The Reproduction Of Capitalism suggests a sustained interest in such methodologies, while what has been called the “descriptive turn”—which encompasses practices as disparate and ill-defined as Latourian Actor-Network Theory, Morettian “distant reading”, and Heather Love’s revival of “thin description”—has attempted to caution scholars away from symptomatic reading, ideology critique, and broadly “deconstructive” critical practice.

Companion to Victorian Popular Fiction

updated: 
Monday, August 1, 2016 - 2:26pm
McFarland & Company, Inc.
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 15, 2016

McFarland, an independent publisher of academic and adult nonfiction books, will be releasing A Companion to Victorian Popular Fiction in 2018. Companions to certain aspects of popular fiction—or works written for the mass publishing market and read by large segments of the British public—have been published. Yet there is no single volume devoted to popular fiction in its entirety. Through short but incisive and insightful cross-referenced entries, the 150,000 word companion will cover authors, topics, representative texts, and genres.

The Silence of Dean Maitland: Page, Stage, Screen (critical edition and new essays)

updated: 
Monday, August 1, 2016 - 11:47am
Syracuse University Dept of English
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 1, 2016

In 1886, Maxwell Gray (pseudonym for Mary Gleed Tuttiett) published The Silence of Dean Maitland. The plot of the scandalous novel concerns a young British clergyman, Cyril Maitland, who, after killing the father of a village woman he has seduced, allows a friend, Henry Everard, to be implicated in the crime. Following a trial, Henry is transported to Australia, where he serves out a twenty year prison sentence, while Cyril ascends the church hierarchy. The Silence of Dean Maitland was a bestseller. It was subsequently adapted for the stage and the screen: the play was a hit; the silent film of 1914 enjoyed considerable success in the U.K. and Australia; and the film of 1934 was something of a blockbuster.

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