category: victorian

James and Terror, Midwest MLA, November 4-7, 2010 (Abstract deadline 7/9)

full name / name of organization: 
International Henry James Society / Midwest Modern Language Association
contact email: 
jchung10@depaul.edu

HJS invites papers for a panel that explores James’s representations of terror and violence in his fiction and essays.

Gylphi SF Storyworlds [UPDATE]

full name / name of organization: 
Dr Paul March-Russell
contact email: 
P.A.March-Russell@kent.ac.uk

SF Storyworlds is a new critical studies series in science fiction published by UK academic press, Gylphi.

Decadent Poetics, 1-2 July 2011

full name / name of organization: 
Centre for Victorian Studies, University of Exeter, UK
contact email: 
decadent-poetics@exeter.ac.uk

Keynote speakers: Stephen Arata (Virginia); Joseph Bristow (UCLA); Regenia Gagnier (Exeter); Catherine Maxwell (Queen Mary, London)

Arkansas Philological Association 2010 Conference: “Visions and Revisions” October 7-9, 2010 Fayetteville AR

full name / name of organization: 
Arkansas Philological Association
contact email: 
lhinrich@uark.edu

Call for Papers
Thirty-seventh Annual Meeting of the
Arkansas Philological Association
2010 Conference:
“Visions and Revisions”

October 7-9, 2010
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Transatlantic Literature and the Production of National Identities, 1870-1910

full name / name of organization: 
Keridiana Chez
contact email: 
kerychez@gmail.com

This panel has already been accepted by the Midwest Conference for British Studies, October 8-10, 2010, Cleveland. We are seeking a fourth paper.

Arizona’s recent attack on ethnic studies brings to glaring light the relationship between the production of cultures, racial identities, and nations. How are national identities contingent on the constitution of, or at least the appearance of, a homogeneous racial identity, which in turn, is produced and maintained through the vigilant regularization of a distinct national culture?

Querying how literature galvanizes racial solidarities and exclusions towards the establishment of nationalities, this panel takes a transnational approach to American and British literatures at the turn of the twentieth century, a transitional period where the United States increasingly came into its own as a world power. The analogy of the United States as a “child” with limitless potential and “mother” Britain as an aging—perhaps dying—parent became more complicated in the tumultuous and highly self-conscious fin de siècle. Our papers explore how the establishment of discrete “Americanness”—as a cultural and a “racial” identity—happened contra British self-making and vice versa, and how literature provided a site to construct physical and affective “race” markers. Together, we investigate how fin de siècle writings negotiated to what extent the “child” could be a discrete—perhaps superior—“racial” and national identity than its “mother.”

Dickens Universe Nineteenth-Century Seminar---8/1--8/7 2010--Proposal due June 15th

full name / name of organization: 
The Dickens Project
contact email: 
jrottke@ucsc.edu

Invitation to Apply for the Dickens Universe Nineteenth-Century Seminar

Word, Image, and Contemporary Lyric Voice(s) (NeMLA--April 7-10, 2011)

full name / name of organization: 
Anne Keefe, Rutgers University
contact email: 
akeefe@eden.rutgers.edu

Word, Image, and Contemporary Lyric Voice(s)

42nd Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
www.nemla.org
April 7-10, 2011
New Brunswick, NJ – Hyatt New Brunswick

CFP: The Cowper and Newton Journal (Spring 2011 Issue)

full name / name of organization: 
The Cowper and Newton Museum, Olney, UK
contact email: 
t.seward396@btinternet.com

The Cowper and Newton Journal

CALL FOR PAPERS

Literary Dress: Fashioning the Fictional Self (due 9/30; NEMLA 4/7-4/10, New Brunswick NJ)

full name / name of organization: 
Heath Sledge and Helen Dunn/ NEMLA 2011
contact email: 
confabstracts@gmail.com

Literary Dress: Fashioning the Fictional Self

Legal Fictions, NEMLA, April 7-10, 2011

full name / name of organization: 
42nd Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association
contact email: 
chyde@eden.rutgers.edu

The concept of a “legal fiction”—“a supposition avowedly false, but treated as if it were true, for the imagined convenience of administering the law” (Lewis, 1832)—describes the pretenses

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