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"(Dis)realities and the Literary and Cultural Imagination" April 5-6, 2013

updated: 
Monday, November 5, 2012 - 10:16am
Graduate English Organization Conference, University of Maryland, College Park

What is (dis)reality? In The Metaphysics of Virtual Reality, Michael Heim notes the multiple attempts to define reality in Western history. The effort to delineate reality begins with Plato's notion of ideal forms as the "really real," through Aristotle's emphasis on material substance. Reality in medieval times is mirrored in the shimmer of religious symbols; efforts to catalogue the real mark the Renaissance, and the atomic bomb defines the reality of the Modern era. In contrast, material representations of the "real" are often surreal, intangible, and unregulated in Latin American, Caribbean and African literatures and cultures e.g. the work of Gabriel García Márquez, Ben Okri amongst many others.

[UPDATE] CFP: Literature (General) SW/TX PCA/ACA (11/16/12; 2/13-16/13)

updated: 
Monday, November 5, 2012 - 7:59am
Southwest/Texas Popular Culture Association

Have a great paper on a literary topic that you're dying to share with the SW/TX PCA/ACA, but can't find a home for it in a special literature area? Fret no more, friend scholar, for I give you… the General Literature Area!

UPDATE: Postcolonial Environmental Criticism: Towards a Transnational Turn in Environment

updated: 
Monday, November 5, 2012 - 1:48am
The 2013 Association for the Study of Literature and Environment (ASLE) Biennial Conference

Ecocriticism has been a flourishing field of inquiry for the past three decades. However, literary critics have only recently begun to explore literature and the environment from postcolonial perspectives. In an attempt to theorize postcolonial environmental criticism, this panel examines the intersections of postcolonialism and environmentalism in the context of contemporary globalization. With the intensification of globalization in the 1990s, there has been an explosion of local environmental movements in the global south protesting neoliberal agendas, such as development, modernity, and progress, often collaboratively implemented by national governments and international finance.

[UPDATE]"Memory & the Digital Humanities: A Pecha Kucha-Style Roundtable" Fordham Univ. GEA Conf. 3/2/13. Deadline 12/15/12

updated: 
Sunday, November 4, 2012 - 7:49pm
Fordham Graduate Digital Humanities

Do digital platforms change the way we remember? How will the myriad tracks we leave behind online shape the historical practices of the future? When and how do digital technologies in the classroom move from being novel experiments to transparent modes of teaching? How does digitization reshape archives and archival methodologies? How does metadata contribute to forgetting and the shape of memory? How do we define and put into practice the growing field of Digital Humanities?

Resurrecting the Book: 15-17 November 2013, Library of Birmingham, England

updated: 
Sunday, November 4, 2012 - 4:59pm
Newman University College; The Typographic Hub, Birmingham City University; The Library of Birmingham; Digital Ink Drop; The Library of Lost Books

PLENARY SPEAKERS: Professor Sir David Cannadine, Princeton University;
Professor Johanna Drucker, UCLA;
Dr David Pearson, City of London Corporation;
Professor Nicholas Pickwoad, University of the Arts, London.

CONFIRMED SPEAKERS: Professor David Roberts, Birmingham City University;
Dr Jason Scott-Warren, Cambridge University;
Linda Carreiro, University of Calgary;
Sarah Bodman, University of the West of England

Monstrous Spaces in Literature and Pedagogy -- March 9, 2013 Keynote Speaker: Dr. Stephen Sicari

updated: 
Sunday, November 4, 2012 - 1:31am
St. John's University Graduate English Conference

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We welcome papers concentrating on 'spaces' that could be considered 'monstrous' or are in some way capable of creating 'monstrosity.' Spaces may be real or imagined, literal or metaphorical, psychological or material. Literal places may include sites of trauma, genocide, or biological experimentation; dystopias; colonized regions; mythical lands; etc. Psychological spaces may include memory, neurosis, philosophy, etc. Monstrosity may be perceived as depravity; social or sexual taboos; hegemonic power in the form of racism, classism, sexism; etc. Papers may challenge, call to light, or reinforce perceptions of monstrosity.

Topographies of Theatre Documents in the Industrial Era

updated: 
Saturday, November 3, 2012 - 8:55pm
Society for the History of Authorship, Reading, & Publishing

Seeking papers on "topographies" of C19 Theatre Documents: Playscript; playbills; programs; tickets. For panel at the Annual SHARP Conference (Society for the History of Authorship, Reading, & Pubishing), Philadelphia, 18-21 July 2013. Conference theme: Geographies of the Book

Stet Journal now Recruiting Postgraduate Peer Reviewers

updated: 
Saturday, November 3, 2012 - 10:11am
King's College London

Stet, the online postgraduate journal of the English Department at King's College London, is now recruiting postgraduate peer-reviewers for a themed issue on the concept of 'Dis/Orientation' in literature of all periods. We are looking for doctoral students who are interested in gaining experience and developing career-relevant skills in the publishing process. As peer reviewer for Stet, you will screen and blind-review a manuscript article and produce a short evaluation report.

[UPDATE] Deadline Approaching for Stet Journal Issue on 'Dis/Orientation'

updated: 
Saturday, November 3, 2012 - 9:58am
King's College London

Stet, the online postgraduate journal of the English Department at King's College London, is now accepting submissions from current postgraduate students for its third peer-reviewed publication. In this issue, we will present articles from an international pool of students on the concept of dis/orientation. We seek to explore the question of how we are and have been located or dislocated in space, time, and history. Which parts of our personal, social, cultural, geographical, genetic, or technological landscape orient us? What incidents construct our conception of ourselves and our environments?

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