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SCMLA Conference on Christianity and Literature session, October 28-30 2010

updated: 
Tuesday, November 17, 2009 - 11:34am
full name / name of organization: 
South Central Modern Language Association Regional Conference
contact email: 

South Central MLA 2010
Conference on Christianity and Literature Session
October 28-30, at the Sheraton Forth Worth Hotel

The 2010 SCMLA Conference on Christianity and Literature session seeks papers that examine the connections between Christianity and literature. Especially welcome are those papers which respond to the conference theme "New Frontiers." Papers are invited from any discipline, on any time period or genre.

Please send 300-word abstracts or panel proposals by January 31, 2010 to Jessica Hooten, English Department, University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, 900 College Street, Belton, TX 76513 or jhooten@umhb.edu.

[UPDATE] Nov.13, 2010 The 18th Annual English and American Literature Association Conference: Everyday Life and Literature

updated: 
Monday, November 16, 2009 - 7:56pm
full name / name of organization: 
English and American Literature Association of the Republic of China in Taiwan (EALA Taiwan) &Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures,National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan

Literature is related to everyday life in a subtle way. Everyday life often manifests itself as the textual Other outside the major narrative thrust, and, therefore, receives scant critical attention in literary studies. In fact everyday life can be seen as an arena of two-way negotiation: it is where power reproduces itself in daily practice, but it is also where both personal and collective creativity intervenes in the reproduction of power. Moreover, everyday life often emerges, becomes visible, or acquires meaning through its engagement with other social categories—gender, race, class, ethnicity, nature, and so on, whose different relations with dominant regimes of power call for different strategies of everyday life practices.

Undergraduates, Get Your History Papers Published! Submit to HISTORY MATTERS: An Undergraduate Journal of Historical Research

updated: 
Monday, November 16, 2009 - 12:05pm
full name / name of organization: 
HISTORY MATTERS: An Undergraduate Journal of Historical Research
contact email: 

HISTORY MATTERS is a journal whose purpose is to give undergraduates the unique opportunity to be published. Established in 2004, History Matters has received papers from all over the U.S., Canada, Britain, and Australia.

HISTORY MATTERS is published each spring and is edited by undergraduates with the help of a faculty board. The journal consistently publishes about 10% of the submissions, publishing only the papers with high caliber research and writing. Please visit the journal homepage at http://www.historymatters.appstate.edu for more information.

Nov. 13, 2010 18th Annual English and American Literature: Everyday Life and Literature

updated: 
Monday, November 16, 2009 - 1:52am
full name / name of organization: 
English and American Literature Association of the Republicof China in Taiwan (EALA Taiwan) &Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan

Literature is related to everyday life in a subtle way. Everyday life often manifests itself as the textual Other outside the major narrative thrust, and, therefore, receives scant critical attention in literary studies. In fact everyday life can be seen as an arena of two-way negotiation: it is where power reproduces itself in daily practice, but it is also where both personal and collective creativity intervenes in the reproduction of power. Moreover, everyday life often emerges, becomes visible, or acquires meaning through its engagement with other social categories—gender, race, class, ethnicity, nature, and so on, whose different relations with dominant regimes of power call for different strategies of everyday life practices.

[UPDATE] Queer Wales: a collection of essays on sexuality, identity and Wales

updated: 
Sunday, November 15, 2009 - 5:12pm
full name / name of organization: 
Huw Osborne, Assistant Professor, Department of English, Royal Military College of Canada
contact email: 

Queer Wales: a collection of essays on sexuality, identity and Wales

In recent years, we have become more aware of the complexity of Welsh identities (national, European, racial, colonial, economic, etc), and a major feature of this complexity is the queering of Welsh history and culture. The sexual identity of Wales is currently being studied, written, performed, legislated, mapped, bought and sold, yet, as far as sexuality is concerned, to what extent is Wales still "The Land of my Fathers" and the "Land of the White Gloves"? At what point may we begin to articulate a coherent LGBTIQ history and community in Wales?

As Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick explains in Epistemology of the Closet,

[UPDATE] Call for Exemplary Undergraduate Humanities Essays

updated: 
Friday, November 13, 2009 - 3:34pm
full name / name of organization: 
Valley Humanities Review
contact email: 

The Valley Humanities Review is currently seeking essays in the humanities for publication in its Spring 2010 Issue. We seek essays of high quality, intellectual rigor and originality that challenge or contribute substantially to ongoing conversations in the humanities. Topics may include but are not limited to: literature, history, religion, philosophy, art, art history and foreign languages. VHR is also currently seeking poetry submissions; students may submit up to three poems. VHR is committed to undergraduate research and scholarship in the field; therefore, we only accept submissions by current or recently graduated undergraduate students. Our reading period runs from September 1 to December 15 of each year.

T. S. Eliot Society at American Literature Association Conference, May 27-30 2010

updated: 
Friday, November 13, 2009 - 11:53am
full name / name of organization: 
T. S. Eliot Society
contact email: 

The T. S. Eliot Society will
sponsor two sessions at the 2010 Annual Conference of the American
Literature Association, May 27–30, at the Hyatt Regency in San
Francisco. Please send proposals or abstracts(up to 250 words), along
with a curriculum vitae, electronically to Professor Lee Oser
(leeoser@holycross.edu). Submissions must be received no later than
January 15, 2010.

ACLA: Fictions of Haiti (New Orleans 1-4 April 2010; Abstract by 11/23/09)

updated: 
Friday, November 13, 2009 - 10:57am
full name / name of organization: 
Kimberly Manganelli & Angela Naimou, Clemson University

"Commemorations," observes Michel-Rolph Trouillot, "sanitize further the messy history lived by the actors. They contribute to the continuous myth-making process that gives history its more definite shapes: they help to create, modify, or sanction the public meanings attached to historical events deemed worthy of mass celebration." The 2004 bicentenary of Haitian Independence was, in this sense, a failure: it was interrupted in Haiti by the ouster (again) of Jean-Bertrand Aristide and was overtaken by an international political discourse that once again treated Haiti as an a-historical site of spectacular, incomprehensible violence.

Detective Fiction Panel at LSU's Mardi Gras Conference February 11-12, 2010

updated: 
Thursday, November 12, 2009 - 7:21am
full name / name of organization: 
LSU English Graduate Student Association
contact email: 

The detective has always been a central figure in crime narratives. Existing within a dizzying interplay of plots, themes, and recapitulations throughout the long and twisted history of the genre, crime solvers - be they private amateurs, police detectives, or in some other incarnation - have remained a vital force in keeping the crime narrative tradition alive. Indeed, it is often in the detective's resurfacing and shifting that the crime genre is revitalized. But how did this detective figure arise? In what context? And where is (s)he going?

[UPDATE] Visual Arts in the 21st Century

updated: 
Wednesday, November 11, 2009 - 8:47am
full name / name of organization: 
Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities
contact email: 

In the wake of the digital revolution and globalisation policies the whole world is witnessing formation of certain conditions which are having and will continue to have tremendous impact on the production, reproduction, access, dissemination and appreciation of visual arts. While the old art forms and artworks are being revisited and reproduced in wholly new ways and for a variety of purposes, new types in the forms of digital arts are surfacing not only on the internet but also every place of our visual culture. The place and workplace of the artist also has undergone a radical change.

Paths of Progress (?)

updated: 
Wednesday, November 11, 2009 - 12:36am
full name / name of organization: 
California State University, Northridge - Associated Graduate Students of English
contact email: 

In historical periods of intense political unrest or in calls for social reformation, the written word has encompassed the energy and fervor of such revolutionary moments. From the political pamphlets distributed during the French Revolution to the Industrial Revolution that marked a monumental shift in the United States and around the world in regards to labor laws and technological advancements, the idea of "progress" and pushing social expectations forward into a new mode of thought has permeated our culture for centuries. However, as scholars sit in the 21st century and contemplate the social reforms of the past, how do we recognize this notion of "progress"?

Call for Art: How to Do Things with Words and Other Materials [UPDATE]

updated: 
Tuesday, November 10, 2009 - 5:33pm
full name / name of organization: 
Allen Durgin/CUNY Graduate Center--English Student Association

Please disseminate widely.

(Call for Art):
How To Do Things with Words and Other Materials: Artist Books Show-and-Tell
As part of "Spanking and Poetry": A Conference on Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick
English Student Association Conference, Feb 25-26, 2010
The Graduate Center
The City University of New York
New York, New York

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