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"Pop Goes the Region": Regionalism and Popular Art/Literature 31 July 2009

updated: 
Wednesday, April 29, 2009 - 11:14pm
full name / name of organization: 
LiNQ: Literature in North Queensland

We are calling for academic papers, submissions of short stories and poems, and visual art that contemplate the intersection of the regional and the popular in regional Australia but also in terms of regional/global intersections more generally.

The small town, the local, and regionalism have long been considered precious territory to be guarded by grassroots music and local art movements, enshrined in high letters, and embalmed in obscurity. This issue of LiNQ (Literature in North Queensland) seeks to challenge and update this notion of the regional. As the Internet connects us in a global village of downloadable ephemera, the local community is redefined. How does the region connect with the popular?

[UPDATE] Pennsylvania Literary Journal, Summer 2009 Issue: "Experiments" – Deadline – July 6, 2009

updated: 
Wednesday, April 29, 2009 - 7:08pm
full name / name of organization: 
Pennsylvania Literary Journal – Indiana University of Pennsylvania

This is a critical and creative new online journal. It is created to find, edit and publish superior works of fiction, non-fiction, art, multi-media and the like. The Pennsylvania Literary Journal is created to make a positive contribution to literary criticism and to the arts around the world. There are no geographic boundaries or genre boundaries in the first, summer issue – only the restraints of a website template.

Utopian Spaces of British Literature and Culture, 1890-1945

updated: 
Tuesday, April 28, 2009 - 5:20am
full name / name of organization: 
English Faculty, University of Oxford (UK)

From the fin de siècle to the Second World War, the construction of alternative social and private spaces exerted a peculiar fascination for many British writers. The cataclysmic historical events of the period stimulated Utopian thinking and feeling even as they seemed to make them problematic or impossible. At the same time radical demands for new spaces, whether political, religious or aesthetic, also generated new ways of reading and writing the familiar urban and domestic spaces of everyday life.

Reading Ethics in the 21 Century (SAMLA, Nov.6-8, 2009) [UPDATE]

updated: 
Monday, April 27, 2009 - 9:39am
full name / name of organization: 
Raina Kostova
contact email: 

SAMLA 2009
Reading Ethics in the 21 Century
Call for Papers
Since Aristotle the understanding of ethics as a branch of philosophy has been defined as a pragmatic rather than a theoretical field: ethics does not simply involve a discussion of virtues, but the practice of "virtual activities." It is concerned, as Sartre later insists, with living "in the world," where one has the individual moral responsibility for the other and for the political structure of society. The personal responsibility to act "ethically" in this case is made possible by the essential freedom of choice of each individual.

Fairy Tale Economies

updated: 
Sunday, April 26, 2009 - 7:52pm
full name / name of organization: 
Dr. Molly Clark Hillard: University of Southern Mississippi and Group for International Fairy Tale Studies

Fairy Tale Economies

An interdisciplinary, international conference
October 1—3, 2009
University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg MS

Mindful of our own global economies, this colloquium addresses economies in fantastic literature and culture. We shall identify economy both as a theme within literatures and as a way of thinking about the value of fantastic literature itself.

Re-reading Rider Haggard (1st August)

updated: 
Saturday, April 25, 2009 - 9:45am
full name / name of organization: 
John Miller and Robbie McLaughlan/ University of Glasgow

Henry Rider Haggard (1856-1925) was a novelist, country gentleman, social commentator, onetime colonial administrator and failed ostrich farmer whose prodigious output comprises a significant but under-examined contribution to late nineteenth and early twentieth century literature. While his two most famous works, King Solomon's Mines (1886) and She (1887) have attracted a steady stream of articles in recent years, most notably from the fields of postcolonial and gender studies, a significant proportion of his oeuvre remains almost entirely unstudied, despite their considerable popular success in his lifetime. In order to extend and enhance Haggard scholarship we are soliciting proposals for chapters in a forthcoming edited collection of essays.

[UPDATE] States of Crisis - Graduate Conference

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 10:56pm
full name / name of organization: 
Brandeis University - Department of English and American Literature

States of Crisis
Friday, 9 October 2009
Brandeis University
Department of English and American Literature
Seventh Annual Graduate Conference

Since its origin in the ancient Greek krisis, "decision," related to krites, a judge, the term crisis has referred to ideas of discernment, evaluation, criticism, and sifting of evidence. In literary studies, for example, one can see moments of crisis in shifting aesthetics and changing genres as well as in literary tradition(s), character representation, and ideas of narrative. Drawing on interdisciplinary approaches and scholarship, this conference will explore different responses to the idea of crisis in the humanities and social sciences.

Questioning Identity--Representations of Class

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 3:24pm
full name / name of organization: 
English Graduate Organization (EGO) @ Western Illinois University
contact email: 

The English Graduate Organization (EGO) at Western Illinois University in Macomb is currently accepting CFPs for their 6th annual conference, Questioning Identity—Representations of Class. Possible paper topics might include but are not limited to the following:
Class Conflict
Marxism
Representations of Labor
Consumption
Capitalism
Globalization
Commodities
Working Class
Economics
Gender
Nationalism
We welcome your ideas! Please send a 250-300 word abstract to: SJ-Naslund@wiu.edu

Pennsylvania Literary Journal, Summer 2009 Issue: "Experiments" – Deadline – July 6, 2009

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 1:55pm
full name / name of organization: 
Pennsylvania Literary Journal – English Literature Department, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

This is a critical and creative new journal. It is created to find, edit and publish superior works of fiction, non-fiction, art, multi-media and the like. It will be primarily an online journal. Until an independent website is developed the journal will be housed at www.myspace.com/pennsylvaniajournal.

Modernism, Gender, and Fin de Siecle Theatre - MSA, Montreal (november 2009)

updated: 
Thursday, April 23, 2009 - 3:57pm
full name / name of organization: 
Stephanie Byttebier
contact email: 

Recently, Toril Moi has argued for a rehabilitation of Ibsen as a modernist dramatist and described a number of key features of his version of modernism: his embrace of theatre as an art form, his critique of theatricality, his foregrounding of a meta-theatrical skepticism, and his preoccupation with the key social issue of the position of women in society (Henrik Ibsen and the Birth of Modernism). This panel will seek to extend Moi's claims by asking if we can identify an "other," early or "original" modernism—one somewhat different from what Moi, borrowing from Frederic Jameson, calls the post-WWII "Ideology of Modernism"—in the works of various fin de siècle dramatists staging rebellious women.

Writing Rider Haggard

updated: 
Thursday, April 23, 2009 - 5:11am
full name / name of organization: 
Robbie McLaughlan and John Miller/ University of Glasgow

Henry Rider Haggard (1856-1925) was a novelist, country gentleman, social commentator, onetime colonial administrator and failed ostrich farmer whose prodigious output comprises a significant but under-examined contribution to late nineteenth and early twentieth century literature. While his two most famous works, King Solomon's Mines (1886) and She (1887) have attracted a steady stream of articles in recent years, most notably from the fields of postcolonial and gender studies, a significant proportion of his oeuvre remains almost entirely unstudied, despite their considerable popular success in his lifetime. In order to extend and enhance Haggard scholarship we are soliciting proposals for chapters in a forthcoming edited collection of essays.

Modernism, Gender, & Fin de Siecle Theatre - MSA Montreal (November 2009)

updated: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2009 - 7:45pm
full name / name of organization: 
Stephanie Byttebier
contact email: 

Recently, Toril Moi has argued for a rehabilitation of Ibsen as a modernist dramatist and described a number of key features of his version of modernism: his embrace of theatre as an art form, his critique of theatricality, his foregrounding of a meta-theatrical skepticism, and his preoccupation with the key social issue of the position of women in society (Henrik Ibsen and the Birth of Modernism). This panel will seek to extend Moi's claims by asking if we can identify an "other," early or "original" modernism – one somewhat different from what Moi, borrowing from Frederic Jameson, calls the post-WWII "Ideology of Modernism" - in the works of various fin de siècle dramatists staging rebellious/fallen/deviant women.

[UPDATE] CFP: Justice and Mercy Have Kissed (SAMLA 11/6-8/09; deadline 5/1/09)

updated: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2009 - 4:32pm
full name / name of organization: 
Abigail Lundelius/Southeastern Conference on Christianity and Literature
contact email: 

CALL FOR PAPERS
South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA)
November 6-8, 2009
Renaissance Atlanta Hotel Downtown
Atlanta, GA

Deadline: May 1, 2009

JUSTICE AND MERCY HAVE KISSED

When exploring the issue of human rights, two rallying cries are often heard. The voice of justice insists that mercy can only be had in a world of moral standards, while the call to mercy responds that justice can only condemn in a world that needs redemption. And yet, Christians are called to hold these two contrary impulses in careful balance – called to reconcile the irreconcilable.

Steampunk! Revisions of Time and Technology. SAMLA 11/6-11/9 2009. Deadline for abstracts: May 20, 2009

updated: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2009 - 2:59pm
full name / name of organization: 
Kathryn Crowther / SAMLA

This SAMLA special session panel welcomes papers on any aspect of the Steampunk genre. Papers could address literature, film, art, or other cultural manifestations of Steampunk. Of particular interest are discussions of the ways that Steampunk engages with notions of time and historical discourse, the materiality of Steampunk, and the intersections of technology and literature. By May 20, please send a one-page abstract that includes audio/visual needs and a short vita (with complete contact information) to Kathryn Crowther, Georgia Institute of Technology at kathryn.crowther@lcc.gatech.edu

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