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Oscholars Special Issue: The Soul of Man: Oscar Wilde and Socialism [abstracts 15 Jul 09; final articles 15 Dec 09]

updated: 
Monday, April 20, 2009 - 3:01pm
full name / name of organization: 
Oscholars
contact email: 

H.G. Wells once wrote that Oscar Wilde's 'The Soul of Man Under Socialism' offers "an artist's view of socialism, but not a socialist's." George Orwell, reviewing the essay in 1948, called Wilde's vision of socialism "Utopian and anarchistic." So was Oscar Wilde a socialist? an anarchist? an "individualist"? or politically unquantifiable? He was acquainted with the leading socialists of the time, from William Morris to G. B. Shaw, his sympathy for socialist and anarchist ideas was well known, and 'The Soul of Man' attained great popularity with the radical movements of Central and Eastern Europe and the USA.

Urban Planning in the Romantic Era

updated: 
Sunday, April 19, 2009 - 7:29pm
full name / name of organization: 
Special Session on Urban Planning in the Romantic Era/ ICR 2009 Conference, NYC
contact email: 

Proposed Special Session for the International Conference on Romanticism, Annual Conference, New York, NY, Nov. 5-9, 2009

Urban Planning in the Romantic Era

Literary Journalism Studies call for submissions

updated: 
Sunday, April 19, 2009 - 9:14am
full name / name of organization: 
The Journal of the International Association for Literary Journalism Studies

LITERARY JOURNALISM STUDIES, a peer-reviewed journal sponsored by the International Association for Literary Journalism Studies (IALJS), invites submissions of scholarly articles on literary journalism, which is also known as narrative journalism, literary reportage, reportage literature, "new journalism" and the nonfiction novel, as well as literary nonfiction and creative nonfiction that emphasizes cultural revelation. The journal is international in scope and seeks submissions on the theory, history and pedagogy of literary journalism throughout the world. All disciplinary approaches are welcome.

CFP: The Brontës in Context III (The Brontës' Poetry) (10/2-3/2009)

updated: 
Wednesday, April 15, 2009 - 6:22am
full name / name of organization: 
University of Salford, Centre for Literary Studies

The Brontës in Context III (The Brontës' Poetry)
2-3 October 2009, University of Salford, Greater Manchester, United Kingdom

This third two-day research workshop aims to focus on an area of Brontë scholarship that has not as extensively been explored as the novels of the three sisters. The workshop will investigate the poetry of the Brontës and contextualise the poems in terms of a variety of ideas and discourses such as Romanticism, Victorian religiosity, femininity, genre, etc.

[UPDATE] Special Issue: Steampunk, Science, and (Neo)Victorian Technologies

updated: 
Monday, April 13, 2009 - 4:07pm
full name / name of organization: 
Rachel Bowser and Brian Croxall / Neo-Victorian Studies

Neo-Victorian Studies invites papers and/or abstracts for a 2009 special issue on neo-Victorianism's engagement with science and new/old technologies, especially as articulated through the genre of Steampunk. As a lifestyle, aesthetic and literary movement, Steampunk can be both the act of modding your laptop to look like and function as a Victorian artefact and an act of (re-)imagining a London in which Charles Babbage's analytical engine was realised. Steampunk includes applications of nineteenth-century aesthetics to contemporary objects; speculative extensions of technologies that actually existed; and the anachronistic importation of contemporary science into fictionalised pasts and projected futures.

This is Nowhere: Local, Regional and Provincial Spaces in World Literature - 24 October 2009 (Deadline: June 1st 2009)

updated: 
Sunday, April 12, 2009 - 5:33pm
full name / name of organization: 
UC Berkeley, Graduate Program in Comparative Literature
contact email: 

For all their complexity, recent discussions of cosmopolitanism, comparativism, and world literature have tended to privilege the global over the local, the macro over the micro, and the city over the country. These discussions have prompted us to ask some of the following questions: what constitutes a small town, region, province, village, settlement, or other small-scale community? How have these and other terms historically been used by the cultural centers from which most discourse is generated? What does it mean to speak or write from a local or regional community within the context of the world republic of letters? How is this related to or different from writing for a small-scale community?

European Journal of English Studies, Vol. 15 Matter and Material Culture 2011

updated: 
Sunday, April 12, 2009 - 2:50am
full name / name of organization: 
Università degli studi della Calabria; Università degli studi di Salerno; Routledge

European Journal of English Studies, Vol. 15
Matter and Material Culture
Deadline for proposals: 13 November 2009

Guest Editors: Maurizio Calbi & Marilena Parlati.

Cultural materialism has been adding much to our knowledge and understanding of the ways in which culture is informed by and conformed to and with matter, and so have the numerous analyses and histories of material culture from fields as varied as sociology, anthropology, museum studies, consumer studies, and so forth.

The Literary Menagerie

updated: 
Saturday, April 11, 2009 - 7:05pm
full name / name of organization: 
Jeanne Dubino and Ziba Rashidian

You are invited to contribute to an edited volume entitled "The Literary Menagerie." The last decade has seen an intensive scholarly engagement with the question of the human-non-human animal relation, including its artistic and literary representation. This foundational scholarship has made it possible to pursue more focused areas of inquiry. One such area is suggested by Randy Malamud in his "Becoming Animal": "art has the potential to present a valuable . . . account of what it is like to be a different animal from ourselves" (7). Art makes it possible for us to imagine ourselves into another being and also to discover other ways of being human.

CFP: Modern Magazines

updated: 
Friday, April 10, 2009 - 3:38pm
full name / name of organization: 
Christopher G. Reed / Pennsylvania State University
contact email: 

To mark the inauguration of the new biannual Journal of Modern Periodical Studies, this panel calls for papers presenting new work on modern magazines. Papers are encouraged to address the relationship between or among various forms of modernism in magazines ranging from approximately 1885 to 1950. Examples might include the relationship between textual and visual languages of modernism, and/or between magazines as a modern mass-mediated genre and new forms of social identity structured around gender, professional status, or class.
Please send a 300 word abstract and a brief CV by 1 May to Christopher Reed, Penn State University (creed@psu.edu)

Remixing Critical Theory: Literacy Theory as Literary Criticism; 4Cs / CCCC 2010 Panel; 4/22

updated: 
Friday, April 10, 2009 - 3:20pm
full name / name of organization: 
Nicole duPlessis / Texas A&M University
contact email: 

Eldred and Mortensen, in their article "Reading Literacy Narratives" published in College English (1992), call for the movement of literacy studies "in one important direction: into the study of literary texts" (512). Toward this goal, the article identifies categories of literacy-centered literary texts: the "literacy myth," "narratives of socialization," "literature of the contact zone," and "literacy narratives" (Eldred and Mortensen 512-513). However, to date, this article has failed to make a significant impact on literary criticism.

CFP: Humor & Horror/SF/Fantasy - Detroit, MI, 10.30-11.1.09

updated: 
Thursday, April 9, 2009 - 6:03pm
full name / name of organization: 
Midwest PCA/ACA
contact email: 

Dear Humor / Horror, SF, Fantasy Scholar:

You are invited to submit a paper to the Midwest Popular Culture Association / American Culture Association annual meetings being held at the Book Cadillac Westin Hotel, Detroit, Michigan, from Friday through Sunday, October 30-November 1, 2009.

More details about the conference, the hotel and its rates can be found at the MPCA / MACA website.

Re(Viewing) the Landscape of Visual Rhetoric: Topics in Visual Rhetoric; SAMLA Conf. Nov 6-8, 2009; Abstracts Due May 31, 2009

updated: 
Thursday, April 9, 2009 - 11:52am
full name / name of organization: 
Mary Hocks, English Dept, Georgia State University
contact email: 

RE(VIEWING) THE LANDSCAPE OF VISUAL RHETORIC: TOPICS IN VISUAL RHETORIC
The SAMLA special session on visual rhetoric welcomes paper, panel, and performance proposals on topics that deal with all aspects of visual rhetoric, such as visual culture and the Web; teaching visual rhetoric in the classroom; image use in blogs; exploring identities with visual rhetoric; visual rhetoric in student writing; (re)presentations of the body; visual rhetoric in politics; visual rhetoric of physical spaces; visual rhetoric and environmental issues; and other relevant topics.

DIVERSIFICATION AND ITS DISCONTENTS: DYNAMICS OF THE DISCIPLINE

updated: 
Thursday, April 9, 2009 - 11:46am
full name / name of organization: 
Czech Association for the Study of English (CZASE), Department of English, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic
contact email: 

CALL FOR PAPERS
DIVERSIFICATION AND ITS DISCONTENTS:
DYNAMICS OF THE DISCIPLINE
9th Brno International Conference of English, American and Canadian Studies
Organized and hosted by:
Czech Association for the Study of English (CZASE)
Department of English and American Studies, Masaryk University, Brno
Brno, Czech Republic
4 – 6 February 2010
Keynote Speakers: Andreas H. Jucker (Universität Zürich)
Nigel Leask (University of Glasgow)
Martin Hilský (Charles University, Prague)

"The Future ain't what it used to be" - PROPOSALS: MAY 15th 2009 / CONFERENCE: 17th JUNE 2009

updated: 
Wednesday, April 8, 2009 - 1:05pm
full name / name of organization: 
The Future ain't what it used to be: Interactions of Past, Present and Future in Literature and Visual Media - Postgraduate Conference
contact email: 

"The Future ain't what it used to be" is the seventh annual Postgraduate Conference held by the English Programme, University of Dundee. It will investigate questions such as: how have perspectives of the future changed over time, how is the future perceived in literature and the media today, and how do representations of the past help us to imagine the future? Proposals should be 300 words long, for papers lasting 20 minutes. The deadline for proposals is 15th May 2009.

For more information contact Laura Findlay (l.f.findlay@dundee.ac.uk), or go to www.dundee.ac.uk/english/index.htm

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