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CFP: [Victorian] PHOBIA Conference: Constructing the Phenomenology of Chronic Fear, 1789 to the Present

updated: 
Thursday, October 30, 2008 - 4:22pm
full name / name of organization: 
Rachel Hewitt
contact email: 

PHOBIA:
Constructing the Phenomenology of Chronic Fear, 1789 to the Present

An international conference hosted by the Glamorgan Research Centre for
Literature, Arts and Science
Friday 8 â€" Saturday 9 May, 2009
The ATRiuM Campus, Cardiff, UK

Keynote Speakers:

Laura Otis (Emory University):
Networking: Communicating with Bodies and Machines in the Nineteenth
Century (2001)
Membranes: Metaphors of Invasion in Nineteenth-century Literature, Science
and Politics (1999)
Organic Memory: History and the Body in the Late Nineteenth and Early
Twentieth Centuries (1994)

UPDATE: [Victorian] ACLA 2009: The Invention of Human Rights in the Nineteenth-Century Novel ( due 11/3/08; 3/26/09)

updated: 
Wednesday, October 29, 2008 - 2:37pm
full name / name of organization: 
Keridiana Chez
contact email: 

Transnational Humanity: The Invention of Human Rights through the
Nineteenth-Century Novel

This ACLA seminar will explore the transatlantic invention of human
rights, and the construction of the multivalent discourse of "humanity,"
through the nineteenth-century novel. Novels have participated in
directing and redirecting the discourse of the "human"â€"the human as closed
system, as biopolitical species-being unit, as rational individualâ€"by
charting interiorities that are deemed to constitute a "human."

CFP: [Victorian] 9th Annual Craft Critique Culture Conference

updated: 
Monday, October 27, 2008 - 10:41pm
full name / name of organization: 
Raquel Baker
contact email: 

9th Annual Craft Critique Culture Conference
April 3-5, 2009

Love, Loss and Empire
University of Iowa

CRAFT CRITIQUE CULTURE is an interdisciplinary conference focusing on the
intersections among critical and creative approaches to writing both
within and beyond the academy. This year’s conference will examine the
imbrication of affect and empire and will explore the ways in which
affect blurs the lines between presence, absence, past, present, future,
coloniality, postcoloniality and other liminal or ephemeral textual and
identity positions within the increasingly globalized experience of our
present moment.

UPDATE: [Victorian] Midwest Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference: Faking It! Production, Knowledge, Authenticity

updated: 
Monday, October 27, 2008 - 1:31pm
full name / name of organization: 
Midwest Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference
contact email: 

EXTENDED DEADLINE!

Midwest Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference: Faking It! Production,
Knowledge, Authenticity

The fourth annual Midwest Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference at the
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee seeks submissions for “Faking It!
Production, Knowledge, Authenticity,” a graduate student conference to be
held February 20-22, 2009, in conjunction with the Center for 21st Century
Studies and its 2007-09 research theme “Past Knowing.”

CFP: [Victorian] RSVP, 2009: Victorian Networks and the Periodical Press

updated: 
Sunday, October 26, 2008 - 8:22pm
full name / name of organization: 
Kelly Hulander
contact email: 

VICTORIAN NETWORKS and the PERIODICAL PRESS--Research Society for
Victorian Periodicals Annual Conference, August 21-22, 2009

The Research Society for Victorian Periodicals (RSVP) will hold its
annual conference at the University of St. Thomas, Minneapolis, August 21-
22, 2009.

While papers addressing any aspect of Victorian periodicals will be
considered, RSVP particularly welcomes proposals for papers on the ways
in which the newspaper and periodical press relied on a variety of
networks, including journalistic, business, communication and technology,
transportation, imperialist, immigration, political/activist, scientific,
philosophical, literary, artistic, and other social networks.

CFP: [Victorian] FORUM Postgraduate Journal: TECHNOLOGIES

updated: 
Friday, October 24, 2008 - 7:25am
full name / name of organization: 
Jana Funke / Lena WÃ¥nggren

F O R U M - The University of Edinburgh Postgraduate Journal of Culture and the Arts

Issue 8 - T e c h n o l o g i e s

The concept of technology is manifold and encompasses many definitions. Technology may be
defined broadly, as by Melvin Kranzberg in 1959, as "how things are commonly done or made"
and "what things are done and made." Ron Westrum in Technologies and Society: The Shaping of
People and Things (1991) provides a more precise and also threefold definition, stating that
technology consists of "those material objects, techniques, and knowledge that allow human
beings to transform and control the inanimate world."

CFP: [Victorian] Hugh MacColl Centenary Conference

updated: 
Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 7:25am
full name / name of organization: 
Amirouche Moktefi

(First) Call for Papers

Institut d’Histoire et de Philosophie des Sciences et des Techniques
(Paris)
Unité Savoirs, Textes, Language (Lille)
Laboratoire d’Histoire des Sciences et de Philosophie â€" Archives
Poincaré (Nancy)

Organise

The Hugh MacColl Centenary Conference

Boulogne sur Mer, 9-10 October 2009

CFP: [Victorian] Images of children in 19th century British fiction

updated: 
Sunday, October 19, 2008 - 10:50pm
full name / name of organization: 
Meredith Clermont-Ferrand
contact email: 

How did 19th Century British authors, such as Charles Dickens, portray
images of children in their literary works? How does Dickens portray
children, as in Oliver Twist and David Copperfield, as characters caught
up in an economic and political class struggle? Does Dickens use these
images of children to personalize these class struggles? Connecticut
Review is looking for academic essays addressing the images of children
in 19th century British fiction. Your work should be 2,000 to 4,000
words. Submit work to: clermontm_at_easternct.edu in hypertext form or send
2 hard copies to:
Meredith Clermont-Ferrand, Senior Editor
Connecticut Review
CSU System Office
39 Woodland Street

UPDATE: [Victorian] Final CFP for Tennyson's Futures 27-28 March 2009

updated: 
Sunday, October 19, 2008 - 10:10am
full name / name of organization: 
Gregory Tate

CALL FOR PAPERS

‘TENNYSON’S FUTURES’, 27-28 MARCH 2009, ENGLISH FACULTY, UNIVERSITY OF
OXFORD

For I dipt into the future, far as human eye could see,
Saw the Vision of the world, and all the wonder that would be.
-‘Locksley Hall’

I remember once in London the realization coming over me, of the whole of
its inhabitants lying horizontal a hundred years hence.
-Alfred Tennyson

CFP: [Victorian] Swinburne: A Centenary Conference

updated: 
Thursday, October 16, 2008 - 3:02pm
full name / name of organization: 
Catherine Maxwell
contact email: 

‘Swinburne: A Centenary Conference’

Proposals for papers are invited for a conference marking the hundredth anniversary of
Swinburne’s death. ‘Swinburne: A Centenary Conference’ will take place in the Institute of English
Studies, Senate House (London) on Friday 10th and Saturday 11th of July, 2009.

CFP: [Victorian] Victorian Prosody: Special Issue of *Victorian Poetry*

updated: 
Wednesday, October 15, 2008 - 6:03am
full name / name of organization: 
Yisrael Levin
contact email: 

"What form is best for poems?" asks Elizabeth Barrett Browning in her
verse-novel Aurora Leigh. Recent years have shown a growing number of
scholars interested in investigating the cultural, political, historical,
and aesthetic significance of Victorian prosody. For a special issue of
*Victorian Poetry*, we invite papers that focus on Victorian approaches
toward the study of English prosody as a discourse distinct from both
Classical and Romantic prosody. The subject of prosody touches on Victorian
concerns about Englishness, education, music, linguistics, neurology,
physiology, mathematics, geology, philosophy, and even military science;

CFP: [Victorian] Boundaries and boundary violation in 19th Century American literature

updated: 
Tuesday, October 14, 2008 - 11:32pm
full name / name of organization: 
Meredith Clermont-Ferrand
contact email: 

How did 19th Century American authors, such as Edgar Allan Poe and
Nathaniel Hawthorne, challenge the boundaries of storytelling within
their works? How did 19th Century authors challenge what was
considered “acceptable” and “suitable” subject matter by portraying
characters that were insane and/or morally corrupt? How did the
shattering of these boundaries aid in the emergence of the realism found
in 20th Century literature? Connecticut Review is looking for academic
essays that address the boundaries and boundary violations in 19th
Century American literature. Your work should be 2,000 to 4,000 words.
Submit work to: clermontm_at_easternct.edu in hypertext form or send 2 hard
copies to:

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