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Moving Children. PAMLA 10/19-21/2012

Tuesday, January 17, 2012 - 2:34pm
Kate C. Watt, UC Riverside

Whether "transported," imprisoned, committed to the workhouse, trained for positions in "service," apprenticed, shipped off to Canada, adopted, or otherwise disposed of, poor children have been moved, often against their will, for centuries, in both fiction and non-fiction. Explorations of narrative tropes and tensions, rhetorical and ideological rationalizations, and cultural responses to such narratives are welcome.

PAMLA, Seattle, October 19-21, 2012.

Inquiries welcome. Please include PAMLA in your subject line.

CFP: Victorian Networks. Deadline for submission: March 1, 2012

Tuesday, January 17, 2012 - 2:00pm
North American Victorian Studies Association

The North American Victorian Studies Association Conference for 2012, in Madison, Wisconsin, September 27-30, invites papers on the theme of networks. Keynotes include Amanda Anderson, Adam Phillips, and a visual networks panel with Caroline Arscott, Tim Barringer, Julie Codell, and Mary Roberts. Participants will also be able to sign up for networks seminars of 15 presenters of precirculated 5-page position papers on the topic.

MLA Special Session: The Mechanics of Fictional World-Making (3/1/12; Boston 2013)

Monday, January 16, 2012 - 10:36am
Elaine Auyoung, Rutgers University

MLA Special Session
The Mechanics of Fictional World-Making
Boston, January 2013

Paper proposals exploring the underpinnings of making and/or experiencing fictional worlds are welcome. Topics may range from mimesis, make-believe, reality effects, stagecraft, illusion, to the cognition of representational art. Submit 300-word abstracts by 1 March 2012 to Elaine Auyoung ( Special sessions are subject to approval; all panelists must be members of the MLA.

Animate Objects, Inanimate Bodies

Monday, January 16, 2012 - 9:18am
King's College London

King's College London Annual Postgraduate Conference

What separates the human body from the objects around it? Are objects merely inanimate, inorganic things that are designed and used by human bodies? Is it solely the human body that is the physical site or limit of the self? Is there a divide between the human body and the object in the first place?

We are looking for papers which examine the interactions (or lack thereof) between bodies and objects in literature. These interactions could suggest an impenetrable divide between the human body and the object, could question where the body ends and the object begins, or could reveal how bodies and objects inform one another.

"Antagonisms." Special issue of The Comparatist

Sunday, January 15, 2012 - 12:43pm
The Comparatist

Call for Papers: Special Issue, The Comparatist

We welcome contributions that examine the representation and staging of antagonism in comparative studies and literary theory. How might one conceive of antagonism today? Why are certain forms of antagonism readily made visible while others remain hidden—or simply disavowed? How does the field of literary studies manage its own antagonism(s)? Is antagonism—antagonistic rivalry between critics—a hindrance to the faithful work of interpretation? Or is it better understood as, or in terms of, the field's engine of change? Topics of interest could include:

W.S. Gilbert--Author and Critic

Saturday, January 14, 2012 - 11:25pm
MLA 2013--Lyrica Society for Word/Music Relations

W.S. Gilbert changed English musical theatre. We are seeking proposals on all aspects of Gilbert's work, but studies dealing with music receive priority. Send 250 word proposals by February 22, 2012.