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[UPDATE] Journal of Dracula Studies

updated: 
Thursday, February 9, 2012 - 9:03am
Anne DeLong/Curt Herr

We invite manuscripts of scholarly articles (4000-6000 words) on any of the following: Bram Stoker, the novel Dracula, the historical Dracula, the vampire in folklore, fiction, film, popular culture, and related topics.
Submissions should be sent electronically (as an e-mail attachment in .doc or .rtf). Please indicate the title of your submission in the subject line of your e-mail.
Please follow the 2009 updated MLA style.
Contributors are responsible for obtaining any necessary permissions and ensuring observance of copyright.
Manuscripts will be peer-reviewed independently by at least two scholars in the field.
Copyright for published articles remains with the author.

Temptation and Redemption - 12 May 2012

updated: 
Thursday, February 9, 2012 - 8:06am
Carolina Emerging Scholars Conference

The motif of temptation and redemption can be found in almost every area of the humanities and has played a central role in a significant number of works, from the Epic of Gilgamesh to season three of Glee.

FINAL CALL [deadline 10 Feb 2012]: Panel on 'Maurice' (Forster, 1971/Ivory, 1987), AAS, York, UK, 27-28 Sep 2012

updated: 
Wednesday, February 8, 2012 - 8:03am
Dr Claire Monk / De Montfort University, UK

FINAL CALL for Panel Participants (deadline FRIDAY 10 FEBRUARY)
E. M. Forster's Maurice (1913/1971) & 25 years of James Ivory's Maurice (1987): adaptation(s), authorship(s) and reappraisal(s)

at

7th Annual Conference of the Association of Adaptation Studies
'Visible and Invisible Authorships'
27–28 September 2012, University of York, UK

Portals Literary Journal is accepting submissions for our Spring 2012 issue.

updated: 
Tuesday, February 7, 2012 - 8:29pm
San Francisco State University, Comparative Literature Student Association

2012 Call for Submissions
Portals is currently accepting submissions for our Spring 2012 issue.

Submission deadline: March 1, 2012.

Portals invites original critical essays and short creative fiction that explore comparative literary topics across cultural, regional, linguistic, and temporal boundaries for the Spring 2012 issue. This edition will be available in scholarly journal listings worldwide.

Formal requirements for original critical essays:

CFP: Distinctions that Matter: Popular Literature and Material Culture (journal issue, abstract deadline: March 1, 2012)

updated: 
Tuesday, February 7, 2012 - 11:35am
Belphégor: Popular Literature and Media Culture

Essays are invited for a special issue of Belphégor that seeks to explore the relationship between distinctions of taste and textual production by examining how the materiality of literary texts influences and perhaps even determines their cultural status. In the nineteenth century, for example, printing and binding became cheaper, faster, and more easily accessible than ever before, which resulted in an explosion of print material. As printing costs decreased and print runs increased, the price of books became cheaper and publishers were able to attract more readers, which led to a greater demand for new content. The cultural impact of this shift was twofold.

[UPDATE] Principles of Uncertainty: A Conference on Critical Theory

updated: 
Monday, February 6, 2012 - 10:34pm
CUNY Graduate Center Comparative Literature Department

"Principles of Uncertainty"

A Conference on Critical Theory

Keynote Speaker: Martin Hägglund

The students of the Department of Comparative Literature at the City University of New York Graduate Center present the first annual interdisciplinary conference on literary theory to be held Friday, May 4, 2012. This conference is being given in support of the CUNY Graduate Center's proposed certificate for Critical Theory, which is dedicated to the study of literary and critical theory.

We invite papers from all disciplines focusing on works from any period that explore the theme of uncertainty as it pertains to literary and critical theory.

Design, Mediation, and the Posthuman (deadline: March 30, 2012)

updated: 
Monday, February 6, 2012 - 12:15pm
Dr. Amy Propen, Rhetoric and Composition, York College of Pennsylvania (apropen@ycp.edu; http://amypropen.com/) Dr. Colbey Reid, Literary Studies, York College of Pennsylvania (creid@ycp.edu) Dr. Dennis Weiss, Philosophy, York College of Pennsylvania (d

In the early days of the Internet, there was much talk about moving from the offline world to the online world. Fanboys to cybertheorists proclaimed the demassification of culture. Life, we were told, would become increasingly virtual and the world of things wouldn't matter much. In their 1994 preamble to "Cyberspace and the American Dream: A Magna Carta for the Knowledge Age," cyberlibertarians Esther Dyson, George Gilder, and George Keyworth nicely articulated this early Internet dream: "The central event of the 20th century is the overthrow of matter. In technology, economics, and the politics of nations, wealth—in the form of physical resources—has been losing value and significance.

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