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[UPDATE] Trauma and Culture - edited collection from Cambridge University Press

updated: 
Friday, December 23, 2011 - 5:24pm
Department of English at Louisiana State University

It has become apparent with the sixth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, and the tenth anniversary of 9/11, that major traumatic events continue to resonate in both the individual and social consciousness - perhaps more in the 21st century than ever before. Remembering, rethinking, reworking, and reimagining are just a few of the ways in which authors and artists, historians and critics, audiences and citizens have explored their own traumatic experiences, as well as the traumatic events that continue to impact larger communities.

[EXTENDED DEADLINE]: "Modern Brains: Literary Studies and the Cognitive Sciences"

updated: 
Friday, December 23, 2011 - 3:12pm
British Modernities Group, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Call for Papers and Posters:

"Modern Brains: Literary Studies and the Cognitive Sciences"

British Modernities Group, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

March 9-10, 2012

Keynote Speakers:

David Herman, Department of English, The Ohio State University

Kara D. Federmeier; Department of Psychology, Program in Neuroscience, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Race, History, and National Belonging in American Women's Literature

updated: 
Thursday, December 22, 2011 - 2:06pm
Society for the Study of American Women Writers

In her novel Hagar's Daughter, African American feminist Pauline Elizabeth Hopkins imagines her black female characters as looking back to and claiming cross-racial, gendered legacies in the process of forming their own identities, from Hagar Sargeant's dreaming of white colonial dames to Venus Johnson's militant transvestism. In The House of Mirth, Edith Wharton draws from the exegetical grouping of Judaism, femininity, and sexuality in the persons of Simon Rosedale and Lily Bart to reexamine Old New York's puritanical insistence upon its citizens' moral and physical inviolability.

Innovations and Anxieties - Saturday, March 31, 2012

updated: 
Wednesday, December 21, 2011 - 9:30pm
Graduate Program in English at the University of Rhode Island (Kingston, RI)

Innovations and Anxieties
Saturday, March 31, 2012
A graduate conference hosted by the Graduate Program in English at the University of Rhode Island (Kingston, RI)

Violence: In Theory and Practice March 23-25, 2012

updated: 
Wednesday, December 21, 2011 - 3:33pm
The Seventh Annual University of Ottawa English Graduate Conference

VIOLENCE
In Theory and Practice
March 23-25, 2012

The Seventh Annual University of Ottawa English Graduate Conference
Keynote Speaker: Smaro Kamboureli, University of Guelph

"Violence commands both literature and life, and violence is often crude and distorted." – Ellen Glasgow

Violence is an ever-present phenomenon in literary texts. From Homer's graphic descriptions of infantry combat in the Iliad, to Wilfred Owen's haunting portrayal of the war-torn fields of Europe, to Edith Wharton's subtle critique of Old New York as a place of ruthless social warfare, representations of violence powerfully call our attention to questions of authority, agency and power.

[UPDATE] LITERARY ECOSYSTEMS AND NETWORKS: INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES TO THE ARTS AND SOCIETY - Extended: January 15, 2012

updated: 
Wednesday, December 21, 2011 - 1:08pm
Comparative Literature Graduate Conference at University of Alberta

The Comparative Literature Graduate Student Association invites proposals for papers and visual media projects for its 6th annual graduate conference at the University of Alberta on March 9-10, 2012. Originating from the Office of Interdisciplinary Studies, Comparative Literature students aim to bring together the literary ecosystems and networks from a variety of fields, using methodologies spanning different disciplines in relation to the arts and society in Canada and the world. We welcome comparative, theoretical, and applied participation that showcases the societal issues reflected in the arts and humanities research in different contexts.

"Principles of Uncertainty" May 4, 2012

updated: 
Wednesday, December 21, 2011 - 3:54am
CUNY Graduate Center (Comparative Literature Department and Center for Critical Theory)

"Principles of Uncertainty"
Keynote Speaker: Martin Hägglund

The students of the Department of Comparative Literature at the City University of New York Graduate Center present the first annual interdisciplinary conference on literary theory to be held Friday, May 4, 2012. This conference is being given as part of the CUNY Graduate Center's new Center for Critical Theory, which is dedicated to the study of literary and critical theory.

[UPDATE] Violence in Theory and Practice (March 23rd-25th, 2012)

updated: 
Tuesday, December 20, 2011 - 11:12pm
The University of Ottawa English Graduate Students' Association

"Violence commands both literature and life, and violence is often crude and distorted."
– Ellen Glasgow

Violence is an ever-present phenomenon in literary texts. From Homer's graphic descriptions of infantry combat in the Iliad, to Wilfred Owen's haunting portrayal of the war-torn fields of Europe, to Edith Wharton's subtle critique of Old New York as a place of ruthless social warfare, representations of violence powerfully call our attention to questions of authority, agency and power.

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