Subscribe to RSS - victorian

victorian

Digital Literature Review, Undergraduate Journal, Monsters Issue

updated: 
Tuesday, September 20, 2016 - 10:08am
Digital Literature Review: An Online Journal of Undergraduate Research
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 9, 2017

Literature abounds with monsters - from the dragons that plague medieval towns to the vampires that rise from nineteenth-century graves to the aliens, cyborgs, and zombies that serve as the basis of our contemporary nightmares. The prevalence of these creatures prompts literary critics to ask why they haunt us. What can we learn from a closer examination of these fictional monsters?

(UPDATE) CFP: ACLA Seminar 2017:Taking Pictures, Telling Stories: Photography’s Encounters with Literature (July 6-9, 2017, Utrecht University)

updated: 
Monday, September 19, 2016 - 10:07am
Mavis Tseng/ Taipei Medical University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 23, 2016

ACLA 2017 Utrecht University, Netherlands, July 6-9, 2017

“Taking Pictures, Telling Stories”: Photo­graphy’s Encounters with Literature

 

“The essence of photography is writing with light.”

-- Yousef Khanfar

 

Cross-dressing in fact and in fiction: norms, bodies, identities (April 21st, 2017)

updated: 
Monday, September 19, 2016 - 11:46am
University of Toulouse, France
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Cross-dressing in fact and in fiction: norms, bodies, identities

A one-day conference to be held at the University of Toulouse, France (April 21st)

 

Guest speaker: Professor Ann Heilmann (University of Cardiff)

Book History

updated: 
Monday, September 19, 2016 - 10:08am
College English Association
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2016

The College English Association, a gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations for our 48th annual conference. The conference will be held in Hilton Head, South Carolina from March 30 to April 1, 2017. 

The 2017 theme is "Islands" and CEA invites papers and panels that address the idea of the island.  How are islands in literature and film, as in life, places of desperate refuge and welcome escape?  What respites do they provide? Are islands imagined utopias, or do they offer only barriers and isolation?  Finally, is the study of composition, film, language, literature, and writing, a kind of island amidst the tempest of the current attack on the humanities?

Imagining the Future - Panelist Needed

updated: 
Monday, September 19, 2016 - 10:10am
Michael Torregrossa / NEPCA Fantastic
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

I am looking for a third (and possibly fourth) presenter to fill a slot on a panel devoted to the theme of "Imagining the Future" in fantastic (fantasy, horror, and science fiction) narratives for the meeting of the Northeast Popular Culture/America Culture Association this coming October. The session meets in the afternoon of Friday, October 21, at Keene State University in Keene, NH.

Please send abstract and bio to NEPCAfantastic@gmail.com as soon as possible.

Michael Torregrossa

Area Chair, The Fantastic

 

 

 

English Literature and Central Asia

updated: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016 - 10:58am
James Najarian/Boston College
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

 

For NEMLA Convention, March 23-26 2017, Baltimore MD. 

 

New Work in Novel Studies Symposium

updated: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016 - 11:00am
Novel Theory Across the Disciplines/ Mahindra Humanities Center, Harvard University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 17, 2016

Call for Papers: New Work in Novel Studies

A symposium hosted by the Mahindra Humanities Center, Harvard University

December 7, 2016

From its earliest forms to its contemporary iterations, the novel remains a radically capacious and evolving genre. As the dominant form of modern literature, the novel assumes various overlapping functions as an aesthetic object, cultural artifact, historical text, and conceptual resource. At the same time, novelistic conventions such as plot structure, narrative technique, and characterization shape and inform scholarly research across an array of disciplines.

Strange Sensations: Reading Bodily Experience in the Nineteenth Century: NeMLA 2017

updated: 
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 - 11:23am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

This panel seeks papers that explore the representation and function of sensory experience in the nineteenth century, with an emphasis on strange, unstable or unreliable sensory episodes and their larger literary and cultural significance. Rather than subordinating body to mind, how do nineteenth-century texts reveal an emergent cultural interest in the material body and its physiological particularities? We are especially interested in papers that investigate the role of sensory representations across disciplines and explore bodily matters at the intersection of nineteenth-century literature, science, philosophy or visual art.

Pages