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CFP: [Victorian] Popular Women's Fiction of the 18th & 19th Centuries (RMMLA 10/9-11, 2008, Reno, Nevada)

updated: 
Thursday, January 17, 2008 - 10:57pm
Barbara Z. Vielma

This special session invites papers that explore any aspect of popular
women's fiction of the 18th and 19th Centuries, both British and American.
Popular fiction could include novels, short fiction, or serialized fiction
written by either women or by men primarily for a female audience.
300-500 word proposals (MSWord) are welcomed; please also include a brief
CV or equivalent biographical statement. The deadline for submission is
3/1/2008, and the conference dates are October 9-11, 2008, in beautiful
Reno, Nevada.
Send to bvielma_at_utpa.edu or snail-mail them to Barbara Z. Vielma,
University of Texas-Pan American, CoAS 211, Edinburg, TX 78539

UPDATE: [Victorian] Nineteenth-Century Gender Studies: Special Issue: Gender and Disability

updated: 
Thursday, January 17, 2008 - 10:05pm
Mark Mossman

CALL FOR PAPERS
NINETEENTH-CENTURY GENDER STUDIES
SUMMER 2008
SUBMISSION DATE: March 1, 2008

Nineteenth-Century Gender Studies is a peer-reviewed, online journal
committed to publishing insightful and innovative scholarship on gender
studies and nineteenth-century British literature, art and culture. The
journal is a collaborative effort that brings together advanced graduate
students and scholars from a variety of universities to create a unique
voice in the field. We endorse a broad definition of gender studies and
welcome submissions that consider gender and sexuality in conjunction
with race, class, place and nationality.

CFP: [Victorian] CFP: The Brontes in Context - conference (05/01/2008)

updated: 
Thursday, January 17, 2008 - 3:43pm
Bronte Conference

The Brontes in Context

2â€"3 May 2008
Centre for Literary Studies at the Institute for Social, Culture and
Policy Research, University of Salford, UK

This two-day conference aims to be a contribution to the
contextualisation of the works of the Bronte sisters. Approaches to and
interpretations of contexts of gender and sexual politics, identity, the
longing for self-realisation, materialism, education, writing and print
culture and the Brontes’ engagement with the publishing spheres, the
negotiation of female authorial identity and the constructed authorial
persona and many more themes are welcomed.

CFP: [Victorian] 2008 SCMLA 19th Century British Literature Panel - Border Crossings

updated: 
Wednesday, January 16, 2008 - 8:31pm
Dr. Stephen E. Severn

2008 SCMLA 19th Century Literature Panel - Border Crossings

In conjunction with the theme of the South Central Modern Language
Association’s 2008 Annual Conference â€" “Border’s â€" the 19th Century
British Literature Panel welcomes paper proposals that address the theme
of “Border Crossings in 19th Century British Literature.” The concept
of “border” can be interpreted liberally and may include such topics as:

• Navigating domestic and public space
• The colonies and empire
• Literature from border areas within Britain
• The (re)crossing of rural and urban space
• Transgression / identity of rank and class
• Challenging constructions of gender and sexuality

CFP: [Victorian] UCLA Southland Conference: Genre Matters

updated: 
Wednesday, January 16, 2008 - 6:42am
Laura Haupt and Sam See

19th Annual UCLA Southland Graduate Student Conference Call for Papers

Conference Title: Genre Matters
Conference Date: Friday, May 16, 2008
Keynote Speaker: Lowell Gallagher, UCLA Department of English

CFP: [Victorian] English Nineteenth Century Literature Panel at RMMLA in Reno, Nevada (3/1/2008; 10/9/2008-

updated: 
Tuesday, January 15, 2008 - 5:28am
Mary Bell

CFP: English Nineteenth-Century Literature Panel at the Rocky Mountain
MLA Conference in Reno, Nevada (3/1/2008; 10/9/2008-10/11/2008).

One-page abstracts dealing with any aspect of English Nineteenth-Century
Literature are welcome. Please also include a brief CV or equivalent
biographical statement. The deadline for submission is 3/1/2008, and the
conference dates are October 9-11, 2008.

Please note that accepted presenters will need to be current in their RMMLA
dues by 4/1/2008. Abstracts and CVs may be emailed as Word or RTF
attachments to mebell_at_email.arizona.edu or sent via regular mail to Mary
Bell, University of Arizona, Department of English, Tucson, AZ 85721.

CFP: [Victorian] The History of American Bestsellers (10/01/08; collection)

updated: 
Thursday, January 10, 2008 - 8:30pm
Thomas Ruys Smith

Following a successful first call for papers, we invite further chapter
proposals for an edited volume dedicated to the history of American
bestsellers. We are now interested in receiving chapter proposals on the
following books and authors. (In instances where an author has a number of
texts which might be suitable for inclusion, suggested titles are given in
brackets.)

CFP: [Victorian] Southern Writers, Southern Writing Graduate Conference

updated: 
Thursday, January 10, 2008 - 4:15pm
Jill E. Anderson

The 14th Annual Southern Writers, Southern Writing is a University of
Mississippi Graduate Student Conference held in conjunction with the Annual
Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference.
The Graduate Students in the Departments of English and Southern Studies
invite you to submit abstracts exploring Southern culture. Accepted
submissions will be presented in Oxford, Mississippi, July 17th-19th, 2008.
 The keynote speaker will be John T. Edge, director of the Southern
Foodways Alliance and author of numerous books on Southern cuisine,
including Fried Chicken: An American Story.

Topics for papers or panels are not restricted to literature. They may include:

CFP: [Victorian] The Brontë and the Idea of Influence

updated: 
Wednesday, January 9, 2008 - 8:49pm
Elise OUVRARD

In March 2007, Stevie Davies, Patricia Duncker and Michele Roberts
gathered around Patsy Stoneman at Haworth in Yorkshire to talk about the
influence that the Brontës had had on their evolutions as authors, and
more generally, about the source of inspiration that the most famous
family of writers in England could represent. Patsy Stoneman had already
tackled the topic by publishing a book entitled The Brontë Influence in
2004 with the help of Charmian Knight. The issue of LISA e-journal « Re-
Writing Jane Eyre: Jane Eyre, Past and Present » is further evidence of
Charlotte Brontë’s influence on the writers of the following decades or

CFP: [Victorian] Bric-a-Brackery 2008: Victorian Culture and Literature

updated: 
Wednesday, January 9, 2008 - 10:53am
Jennifer Sattaur

Derived from the French for ‘at random’, the phrase 'bric-à-brac' was
first introduced to the English language in 1840 by Thackeray who
used it to describe a visit to the Palace of Versailles. The purpose of
this conference is to use Thackeray’s expression to debate the nature
of the impact of the curious, exotic and downright odd on Victorian
literature and culture.

CFP: [Victorian] Joseph Conrad Society (UK): The Annual International Conference 2008

updated: 
Tuesday, January 8, 2008 - 9:47pm
Professor Tim Middleton

The Joseph Conrad Society’s 2008 Annual International Conference, its 34th,
will be held at Bishop Grosseteste University College in Lincoln from 2-5
July 2008. (Note: The conference will run from mid-day Wednesday through
Saturday morning, and not the usual Thursday through Saturday.)

Preliminary Information about accommodation, both at the College and in
town, and about travel will be posted on the society web site at
http://www.josephconradsociety.org/annual_conference.htm

Proposals for papers on all aspects of Conrad's life and works are welcome.
The deadline for abstracts is 30 March 2008.

CFP: [Victorian] The Audiobook (MLA 2008)

updated: 
Tuesday, January 8, 2008 - 10:41am
Matt Rubery

Papers for this proposed special session will consider the significance of
the audiobook. The growing popularity of audiobooks over the last decade
means that literary critics may no longer be able to turn a blind eye -- or
a deaf ear, in this case -- to the ways in which oral delivery influences
the reception of literature. This panel will explore the extent to which
the audiobook not only enables us to hear literature but to hear it in new
ways. While audiobooks are still responsible for only a small fraction of
the total book publishing market, their use is among the minority of
reading practices found to be increasing as the number of overall readers

CFP: [Victorian] Textuality, Visuality and their Convergence (2008 RMMLA; Deadline March 1)

updated: 
Tuesday, January 8, 2008 - 2:26am
Susan Cook

Call for Papers:
Textuality, Visuality and their Convergence
Submissions are invited for this Special Topic Session at the October 9-
11, 2008 Rocky Mountain MLA Convention in Reno, Nevada. Papers may
address but are not limited to the following topics:

Writing the visual
Seeing or not seeing texts
Cultural and/or theoretical approaches to textuality and visuality
The role of visual studies in literary scholarship
The role of literary studies in visual studies scholarship
Particular readings that blend these two approaches

Please send a 300-word abstract and a brief CV in .doc or .pdf format to
Susan Cook, susan.elizabeth.cook_at_gmail.com.

UPDATE: [Victorian] Life and Works: The Contexts and Practices of Victorian Life-Writing

updated: 
Monday, January 7, 2008 - 5:11pm
Anna Barton

Life and Works: The Contexts and Practices of Victorian Life-Writing
16th -17th June 2008

Keynote Speakers: Professor Kathryn Hughes (University of East Anglia),
Professor Joanne Shattock (University of Leicester), Professor David
Vincent (Open University) and Professor Colin Cruise (University of
Wales, Aberystwyth).

Keele University solicits submissions for a two-day conference to be held
in celebration of the 40th anniversary of its Victorian Studies Programme.

UPDATE: [Victorian] Deadline Extension: Nineteenth Century Migration and Mobility

updated: 
Friday, January 4, 2008 - 8:37pm
Grace Wetzel

"Get a Move On!": Nineteenth Century Migration and Mobility

A Graduate English Conference sponsored by the University of South
Carolina

Dates: March 7-8, 2008

Keynote Speaker: Ian Duncan, University of California, Berkeley
 
Abstract Deadline: January 25, 2008

Immigrants and expatriates, sailors and soldiers, travelers and
wanderers, men and women: people in the nineteenth century were moving.
Novels and new inventions such as railroads, steamships, and street cars
provided vehicles of transport for individuals and their imaginations,
while the transnational movements of ideas and populations gave rise to a
newly globalized Anglo-American literature.

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