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CFP: [Victorian] Affectation from the Renaissance to today (Proposed Special Session for MLA, San Francisco 2008)

updated: 
Tuesday, October 9, 2007 - 10:11pm
full name / name of organization: 
Bradley W. Buchanan
contact email: 

Affectation from the Renaissance to Today. (Proposed Special Session for MLA Annual Convention,
San Francisco 2008.) What makes a person seem “affected” rather than natural, and why should it
matter? Since the concept of affectation became current during the Renaissance (in part thanks to
texts such as Castiglione's The Courtier) many playwrights, philosophers and novelists have tried to
codify and dramatize the difference between "affected" and spontaneous or natural behavior. This
distinction, however, is frequently blurred by the ambiguity of motives and gestures. Indeed, some
might argue that the effort to distinguish between truthful, heartfelt or natural feelings and

CFP: [Victorian] The Gothic in Literature, Film and Culture (11/6/06; National PCA/ACA Conference, 3/19/08-3/22/08)

updated: 
Sunday, October 7, 2007 - 2:06pm
full name / name of organization: 
Louis.H.Palmer_at_sas.upenn.edu, III

CFP: [20th] The Gothic in Literature, Film and Culture (11/6/06; National PCA/ACA Conference,
3/19/08-3/22/08)
 
NATIONAL POPULAR & AMERICAN CULTURE
ASSOCIATIONS 2008 JOINT CONFERENCE
 
March 19-22, 2008
San Francisco Marriott
San Francisco, CA

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 6, 2008

 We welcome papers and presentations on any aspect of the Gothic in film, literature, or other
forms of cultural expression. All critical approaches are welcome.
 
You can propose an individual paper or a session of three or four presenters. Graduate students
are especially encouraged to submit papers or panels.

CFP: [Victorian] The Madwoman in the Attic After 30 Years

updated: 
Friday, October 5, 2007 - 3:51pm
full name / name of organization: 
Annette Federico
contact email: 

I welcome abstracts and full essays for a proposed edited collection which
would reassess the influence of Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar’s The
Madwoman in the Attic after thirty years. I welcome essays that explore the
legacy of this groundbreaking work for feminist theory and
nineteenth-century literary studies through rereadings of the primary
texts; readings of other works through the book’s critical paradigm; and
explorations of its critical history, especially when placed in relation to
competing theories and critical voices.
Abstracts should be approximately 500 words long. Please submit abstracts
or full essays by email attachment to Annette R. Federico at

CFP: [Victorian] Arabs and the New World

updated: 
Thursday, October 4, 2007 - 3:03pm
full name / name of organization: 
Wail S. Hassan
contact email: 

Call for Papers
American Comparative Literature Association
April 24-27, 2008
Long Beach, CA

Seminar Title: Arabs and the New World

CFP: [Victorian] The Pretty that Hurts: The Cult of Pain and Violating the Body (Grad Panel, 10/15/07; 2/29/08-3/1/08

updated: 
Monday, October 1, 2007 - 5:31pm
full name / name of organization: 
Want Chyi
contact email: 

>From self-mutilation to the rise of plastic surgery; from the Gothic
genre to representations of pain in media and art, how has transgressing
the body yielded consequences for artists and audiences? This panel seeks
critical and creative presentations that explore these questions.

Submit 350-word paper proposals by October 15 to the Southwest Graduate
English Symposium, held at Arizona State University, February 29-March 1,
2008. Please include your name, professional affiliation, home and office
numbers, mailing address, and email address. Also, please include any A/V
requirements with your submission.

CFP: [Victorian] Transatlantic Sensations

updated: 
Monday, September 24, 2007 - 1:14am
full name / name of organization: 
Jennifer Phegley
contact email: 

Call for Proposals and Manuscripts for Transatlantic Sensations

Edited by John Barton (bartonjc_at_umkc.edu) and Jennifer Phegley
(phegleyj_at_umkc.edu)
Deadline: March 1, 2008

CFP: [Victorian] "Get a Move On!": Nineteenth Century Migration and Mobility

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 8:15pm
full name / name of organization: 
Grace Wetzel
contact email: 

"Get a Move On!": Nineteenth Century Migration and Mobility
A Graduate English Conference sponsored by the University of South
Carolina
Dates: March 7-8, 2008
Keynote Speaker: Ian Duncan, University of California, Berkeley

Immigrants and expatriots, sailors and soldiers, travelers and wanderers,
men and women: people in the nineteenth century were moving. Novels and
new inventions such as railroads, steamships, and street cars provided
vehicles of transport for individuals and their imaginations, while the
transnational movements of ideas and populations gave rise to a newly
globalized Anglo-American literature.

CFP: [Victorian] Hypertext and Intertext: Recasting the Master Narrative (grad panel, 10/15/07; 2/29-3/1/08)

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 5:11pm
full name / name of organization: 
Cynthia Calhoun
contact email: 

Jasper Fforde’s popular series of literary detective novels, beginning
with The Eyre Affair, popularized a little-studied literary trope:
intertextual references and devices that subvert the linear master
narrative. From farting bookworms to the “footnoterphone,” Fforde
utilizes font types, footnotes, and misspellings to argue for a multi-
textuality in his novels. How have other writers done the same? For
what purpose? How does this practice affect us as readers? This panel
seeks critical and creative presentations that explore these questions.
Topics may include self-referencing, online hypertext, multiple
narrators, and much more.

CFP: [Victorian]

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 5:02pm
full name / name of organization: 
Cynthia Calhoun
contact email: 

In Elaine Scarry’s book Body in Pain: The Making and Unmaking of the
World, she claims that pain is language destroying, essentially
establishing a barrier between the self and reality that eliminates
meaningful communication with the outside world. Therefore, not only is
it impossible to adequately describe pain, but the possibility of empathy
is all but destroyed. This panel seeks critical and creative
presentations that explore and engage the question: How can a subject
effectively communicate the experience of pain? How can a community
understand or empathize with that subject? Topics may include specific
writers â€" such as Sylvia Plath or Philip K. Dick â€" or a more general
theoretical study.

CFP: [Victorian] Oscar Wilde's Critical Essays (11/15/07); collection)

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 4:09pm
full name / name of organization: 
Alfred J. Drake
contact email: 

I welcome abstracts and full essays for a proposed volume on Oscar Wilde's
critical essays with an emphasis on how those texts were received in the
author's own time and how they have impacted contemporary debates in
criticism and theory. I will also consider abstracts that deal with
Wilde's fiction, poetry, or drama if they suit the collection's emphasis.

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