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CFP: Transatlantic Studies (10/15/06; journal)

updated: 
Saturday, July 1, 2006 - 11:12am
holcom31_at_comcast.net

Atlantikos is an online peer-reviewed journal published by graduate students in the English department at Michigan State University. It represents the most recent work by the most active graduate scholars in the field of Transatlantic Studies, broadly defined as the study of textual, cultural, and performative productions that have multiple resonances across Europe, Africa, and the Americas. We are now accepting essays written by graduate students and others in the field of Transatlantic Studies for publication in our fall 2006 and spring 2007 issues. We encourage both traditional and innovative scholarship addressing critical, cultural, and theoretical issues related to the field.

CFP: Reverse Colonization in Victorian Fiction (9/15/06; NEMLA, 3/1/07-3/4/07)

updated: 
Saturday, July 1, 2006 - 11:12am
Jaime Lynn Jordan

38th Annual Northeast Modern Language Association Conference
March 1-4, 2007
Baltimore, Maryland
www.nemla.org

CFP: Reverse Colonization in Victorian Fiction

This panel will examine the colonial adventure setting within the very
streets of London, including fiction that describes London in the same
manner in which the colonies are described and addresses the fear of
the colonies "coming home" and taking over London. A variety of
approaches is welcome in discussing the Victorian concerns of progress
and decline. Please send 250-word abstracts via email to Jaime Jordan,
University of Texas at Dallas: jlj048000_at_utdallas.edu.

CFP: Words & Notes in the 19th Century (UK) (11/1/06; 7/2/07-7/3/07)

updated: 
Saturday, July 1, 2006 - 11:12am
Geoffrey Chew

CALL FOR PAPERS

Words and Notes in the Nineteenth Century (London, 2-3 July 2007)

Focusing on a century that fostered a growth industry in musical writing
of many kinds (musical novels, programme notes, musical poetry, music
appreciation texts, journalism, scientific treatises, biography, etc.),
this conference seeks to address three main questions. How is music
conceptualized in various textual situations/locations between c.1789 and
1914? How can we best approach the relationships between music and texts?
In what ways might comparative study of different languages, genres or
cultural contexts help us explore the workings of word-music
relationships?

CFP: Neo-Victorianism: The Politics and Aesthetics of Appropriation (UK) (10/31/06; 9/10/07-9/12/07)

updated: 
Monday, June 26, 2006 - 10:28pm
Becky Munford

CFP: Neo-Victorianism: The Politics and Aesthetics of Appropriation
(31/10/2006; 10/09/2007-12/09/2007)

NEO-VICTORIANISM: THE POLITICS AND AESTHETICS OF APPROPRIATION

"The history of the Victorian Age will never be written: we know too much
about it." (Lytton Strachey, Eminent Victorians, 1918)

An international conference hosted by the Centre for Victorian Studies at the
University of Exeter, 10-12 September 2007

Keynote speakers: Professor Cora Kaplan, Professor John Sutherland and
Professor Imelda Whelehan

Confirmed participants to include: Regenia Gagnier, Ann Heilmann, Philip
Hensher, Martina Lauster, Brian Maidment, Rick Rylance

CFP: Literary Utopias of Cultural Communities 1790-1945 (Netherlands) (7/1/06; 10/25/06-10/27/06)

updated: 
Monday, June 26, 2006 - 10:26pm
Leeuwen, E.J. van

Leiden October Conference 2006: The Literary Utopias of Cultural =
Communities, 1790-1945

English Department University of Leiden The Netherlands=20

25 - 27 October 2006

Writing literature is often deemed a solitary enterprise. Literary =
history, however, has proven that, next to famous literary recluses such =
as Thomas Pynchon, there have always existed communities of writers, =
often joined by artists working in different media. From the =
Shelley-Circle to the Bloomsbury group, many of these cultural =
communities engaged with utopian schemes and philosophies in their work. =

CFP: Revisiting Elizabeth Gaskell and Her Works (8/1/06; 9/22/06-9/23/06)

updated: 
Thursday, June 15, 2006 - 12:21pm
Elizabeth Gaskell

REVISITING ELIZABETH GASKELL AND HER WORKS

2-day conference on Elizabeth Gaskell

22-23 September 2006, University of Salford, UK

In recent years Elizabeth Gaskell has attracted renewed scholarly attention,
and contextualisations of her minor works and letters were offered in
addition to the numerous studies of well-known texts such as Mary Barton.
The conference offers to supplement this research by a comprehensive
consideration of Gaskell's major and lesser-known works. A publisher has
expressed interest in publishing revised versions of the conference papers.

Please submit short abstracts (300 words) for 30-minute papers to the
organizers at Gaskellconference_at_hotmail.co.uk

CFP: Weird Science in Nineteenth Century Literature (9/15/06; NEMLA, 3/1/07-3/4/07)

updated: 
Thursday, June 15, 2006 - 12:20pm
Sanner, Dr Kristin N

Call for Papers
=20
38th Convention Northeast Modern Language Association (NEMLA)
March 1-4, 2007
Baltimore, Maryland
=20
Weird Science in Nineteenth Century Literature will explore the =
significance of unconventional or non-traditional science (including =
medicine) in texts of the period. Examples might include, but are not =
limited to: phrenology, mesmerism, alchemy and homeopathy. Please send =
abstracts of 250 words via email to: Kristin Sanner, Dept. of English, =
Mansfield University (ksanner_at_mansfield.edu)
=20
Please include with your abstract:
=20
Name and Affiliation
Email address
Postal address
Phone number
AV requirements (if any)

CFP: Mary Braddon Collection (no deadline noted; collection)

updated: 
Thursday, June 15, 2006 - 11:46am
Jessica Cox

**CALL FOR PAPERS**

FOR A PROPOSED ESSAY COLLECTION ON
MARY ELIZABETH BRADDON

Possible topics for articles might include:

· Braddon and the literary marketplace
· Braddon and the theatre
· Braddon's twentieth century fiction
· Adaptations of Braddon's novels
· Braddon and the sensation school
· Representations of gender in Braddon's work
· Braddon's literary influences
· Braddon's influence on other writers
· Autobiographical elements of Braddon's fiction
· Braddon's writing as social commentary
· Braddon's significance/legacy as a Victorian woman writer

Articles should be between 5000 and 7000 words in length, and should be sent
to:

CFP: Negotiating Homeplace in the 19th-Century (9/15/06; NEMLA, 3/1/07-3/4/07)

updated: 
Thursday, June 15, 2006 - 11:46am
wetzelg_at_mailbox.sc.edu

Call for Papers

Panel: Negotiating Homeplace in the Nineteenth Century

38th Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
March 1-4, 2007
Baltimore, Maryland

During the English and American industrial eras (1840-1910), homelessness was
more than a lack of home ownership. It often implied a lack of opportunity, a
lack of identity, a lack of acceptance. During this era, how did individuals
negotiate their space (or lack thereof)? How did their homes – or lack
thereof – aid or hinder their own development and position in society? What
spaces did they transform, and in what ways did they manage to maintain,
create, or reconstitute their homes?

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