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[UPDATE] ACLA 2012 - Forgiveness in the Wake of Crisis

updated: 
Monday, November 7, 2011 - 3:52pm
Shelly Jansen - Rochester Institute of Technology

ACLA 2011: Collapse/Catastrophe/Change
Providence, RI | 29 March-1 April 2012

In a world of crisis and catastrophe, what do words like "forgivenesss" or "reconciliation" mean? How can we define forgiveness in the post-911 world? What does forgiveness look like in the digital age?

This panel will explore the ethical, social, and political significance of forgiveness in literature. We welcome all topics related to the depiction of forgiveness from all genres and time periods. Possible approaches may include, but are not limited to, analyzing the philosophical, theological, cultural, political, historical and/or social implications of forgiveness.

Journal of Dracula Studies

updated: 
Monday, November 7, 2011 - 12:48pm
Anne DeLong/Curt Herr

We invite manuscripts of scholarly articles (4000-6000 words) on any of the following: Bram Stoker, the novel Dracula, the historical Dracula, the vampire in folklore, fiction, film, popular culture, and related topics.
Submissions should be sent electronically (as an e-mail attachment in .doc or .rtf). Please indicate the title of your submission in the subject line of your e-mail.
Please follow the 2009 updated MLA style.
Contributors are responsible for obtaining any necessary permissions and ensuring observance of copyright.
Manuscripts will be peer-reviewed independently by at least two scholars in the field.
Copyright for published articles remains with the author.

(1 Week To Deadline) Scepticism and Doubt Across Cultures of Crisis: (ACLA panel) March 29 - April 1 2012

updated: 
Monday, November 7, 2011 - 11:15am
Ali Chetwynd - University of Michigan

Are unhappy ages, and their literary productions, less alike than happy ones? In Two Ages, Kierkegaard says that 'In an era of negativity the authentic ironist is the hidden enthusiast'. For J Hillis Miller in The Disappearance of God, meanwhile, Victorian literature is animated by a more dynamic sense of doubt than that celebrated by the modernists who took God's disappearance and other catastrophes for granted. Both these comparative examinations of pessimism suggest that every age has its own sense and its own rhetoric of crisis; and that crisis-born scepticism is interesting in proportion to its degree of doubt and uncertainty, to the contingency of its gestures towards a reclamation of faith.

CFP: Speculative Dimensions of Divination [Deadline: Feb. 15 2012]

updated: 
Saturday, November 5, 2011 - 2:11pm
Femspec

Femspec (a peer reviewed journal dedicated to critical and creative works that challenge gender through speculative means in a variety of genres) is seeking submissions on speculative aspects of divination through any means including Tarot – particularly representations of Tarot and other readings in film, speculative literature, art, poetry, and popular culture.

CFP: "Kick *ss" Moms: Mothering and Reproduction in SF [Deadline: Dec. 15 2011]

updated: 
Saturday, November 5, 2011 - 2:06pm
Femspec

Femspec is an interdisciplinary feminist journal dedicated to sf, fantasy, magical realism, surrealism, myth, folklore, and other supernatural genres. We have been in print since 1999 and boast of an advisory board that includes Suzie Charnas, Pamela Sargeant, and Samuel Delany. We are currently seeking submissions for a special issue or themed section dedicated to women who balance the worlds of adventurer and caregiver, with a focus on mothering and reproduction in sf.

"Re-presenting Memory" - Graduate Student Conference - Submission Deadline: December 25, 2011

updated: 
Saturday, November 5, 2011 - 7:26am
Istanbul University / Department of American Culture and Literature

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International Graduate Student Conference
Call for Papers - "Re-presenting Memory"

"Re-presenting Memory" is the fourth of a series of graduate conferences, organized annually by the Department of American Culture and Literature at Istanbul University. It is part of the "Literature and ..." conferences, the aim of which is to establish an intellectual platform for the discussion of literature in relation to other systems of signification and representation including the cultural, social, political, historical and so on.

The Medieval in New Age and Neopagan Movements

updated: 
Friday, November 4, 2011 - 4:05pm
Call for submissions: Edited collection

We welcome contributions to a collection of essays tentatively entitled "Intuiting the Past: New Age and Neopagan Medievalisms." Scholars of Religious Studies, Gender Studies, Art History, Music History, and Cultural Studies, as well as historians and literary critics, are particularly encouraged to contribute.

Topics may include but need not be limited to:
Appropriations of Kabbalah
Medievalism and Tarot
Hildegard of Bingen and New Age music
Neopagan and New Age Pilgrimage
Grails and femininity
Quests and masculinity
Apocalyptic visions
Christian mystics in New Age contexts
Herbal and "alternative" healing

UPDATE--Reshaping Change: The Language and Literature of Opportunity DUE NOV 15

updated: 
Thursday, November 3, 2011 - 10:37pm
American Comparative Literature Association, Brown University, March 29 - April 1 2012

Aristotle's Poetics defines complex action in tragedy as a change accompanied by reversal or recognition, or both. Given this definition, is change then not a requirement of literature? Even in the Nouveau Roman, change is provided by an unexpected outlook and by stylistic choices in the writing itself. Change is often and legitimately equated to crisis or catastrophe, but may also be seen as a critical element of Literature–in Aristotle's view inherently so. A literary work develops through change, its interpretation by character or reader, and is thus assumed into or by the narrative. The imagination is fed by change. This seminar investigates how literary works represent change in a way that reinterprets or avoids catastrophe.

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